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Encyclopedia > Dorothy Loudon

Dorothy Loudon (September 17, 1933 - November 15, 2003) was a Broadway actress noted for her comedy and belting singing voice, which she used to deliver a wide range of musical comedy and Roaring Twenties songs. September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the street in New York City. ... Belting is the substantive derived from the verb to Belt, and hence has the same heterogenous meanings. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... The Roaring Twenties refers to the North American historical period of the 1920s, which has been described as one of the most colorful decades in American history. ...


She was born in Boston, Massachusetts and began singing as a child. She moved to New York and landed a job as a featured nightclub performer. She became a lounge singer, mingling song with ad-libbed comedy, and was featured on televsion on "The Perry Como Show" and "The Ed Sullivan Show". Nickname: Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe), Athens of America Location in Suffolk County, Massachusetts Founded  -Incorporated September 17, 1630 1820, as a city  County Suffolk County Mayor Thomas Menino (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 232. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...


She made her stage debut in 1962 in The World of Jules Feiffer, a Jules Feiffer play directed by Mike Nichols, with music by Stephen Sondheim. She made her Broadway debut in "Nowhere to Go But Up" which ran only two weeks but earned her outstanding reviews. She appeared in a series of commercial failures (The Fig Leaves Are Falling ran for four performances) which nonetheless garnered her favorable reviews and a nomination for a Tony Award in 1969. She looked back on these with typical humor, once answering the comment "Miss Loudon, I saw you in Comedy Tonight with the response, "Oh, you poor thing! I feel so bad for you!" Jules Feiffer (born January 26, 1929) is a syndicated comic-strip cartoonist and author. ... Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (born March 22, 1930) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ...


She married Norman Paris, a composer who arranged the music for Sondheim's television musical "Evening Primrose", and who wrote the theme song for the television game show "I've Got a Secret". Evening Primrose was a television musical written in 1966 by Stephen Sondheim and James Goldman for ABC Televisions Stage 67. ... Ive Got a Secret (abbreviated as IGAS) was a weekly panel game show produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television and was created by Allan Sherman as essentially a knockoff of Whats My Line?. The original version of the show premiered in June 1952 and...


Her best-remembered role is "Miss Hannigan" in Annie, for which she won the Tony Award for Best Actress in 1977. Annie is a musical based upon the popular Harold Gray comic strip Little Orphan Annie. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater. ...


She was widowed in 1977, and appeared as a recently widowed woman in Ballroom in 1979. Her performance of the song "Fifty Percent" from Ballroom on the Tony Awards was one of a series of triumphant performances on the yearly awards show, which included an outrageous version of "Broadway Baby" from Follies. Her version of Gershwin's "Vodka" had her throwing off a luxurious fur, (telling it to "wait in the car") to reveal a spectacular sleek blue sequined costume, adding "I am too good for this room. I am too good for this song! I am, however, not too good for this dress." George Gershwin photograph by Edward Steichen in 1927. ...


Her television series, Dorothy, in 1979, had her portraying a former showgirl teaching music and drama at a stuffy Girls' School.


She took over as Mrs. Lovett in Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd, and co-starred with Katharine Hepburn in the play West Side Waltz in 1981. Stephen Joshua Sondheim (born March 22, 1930) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Sweeney Todd is a fictional barber and serial killer appearing as a character in various English-language works starting in the mid-19th century. ... Katharine Hepburn Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an iconic star of American film, television and stage, widely recognized for her sharp wit, New England gentility and fierce independence. ...


Her (non-musical) performance as a washed-up television comedienne in 1983's Noises Off received rave reviews, but the role was played in the movie by Carol Burnett (who also got Loudon's role in the 1982 film version of Annie). Noises Off is a stage play by British author Michael Frayn which premièred at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith, London, in 1982 (ISBN 1400031605); and a 1992 comedy film directed by Peter Bogdanovich based on Frayns play, with a screenplay by Marty Kaplan. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933) was one of the most successful female comedians on American television, thanks largely to her variety show that ran on CBS from 1967 through 1978. ...


She appeared in two films, playing an agent in Garbo Talks and an eccentric in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.


She died a widow in New York City of cancer at the age of 70, and was interred in Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York. Kensico Cemetery is a cemetery in Valhalla, Westchester Co. ... Valhalla is an unincorporated hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Mount Pleasant in Westchester County, New York. ...


Plays

  • The World of Jules Feiffer - 1962
  • Nowhere to Go But Up - 1962
  • Noël Coward's Sweet Potato - 1968
  • The Fig Leaves Are Falling - 1969
  • Three Men on a Horse - 1969
  • The Women - 1973
  • Annie (musical) - 1977
  • Ballroom (musical) - 1979
  • Sweeney Todd - 1980
  • West Side Waltz - 1981
  • Noises Off - 1983
  • Jerry's Girls - 1985
  • Comedy Tonight - 1994
  • Dinner at Eight - 2002 (replaced in previews due to ill health)

DVD Cover for the 1939 film, showing (left to right) Crawford, Shearer and Russell The Women is a play by Clare Boothe Luce which opened on Broadway in 1936 at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre with an all-female cast that included Arlene Francis, Marjorie Main, and Doris Day. ... Annie is also the name of a popstar. ... Sweeney Todd is a fictional barber and serial killer appearing as a character in various English-language works starting in the mid-19th century. ... Noises Off is a stage play by British author Michael Frayn which premièred at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith, London, in 1982 (ISBN 1400031605); and a 1992 comedy film directed by Peter Bogdanovich based on Frayns play, with a screenplay by Marty Kaplan. ... Jerrys Girls is a Broadway musical revue based on the songs of composer Jerry Herman. ... Dinner At Eight is an episode of the television show Frasier. ...

Television

  • "It's a Business" - 1952
  • "The Garry Moore Show" - regular appearances 1962-1964
  • "Dorothy" - 1979

Film


  Results from FactBites:
 
Blog of Death: Dorothy Loudon (305 words)
Dorothy Loudon, a Tony award-winning actress, died on Nov. 15 from cancer.
Loudon made her stage debut in 1962 in "The World of Jules Feiffer," a play directed by Mike Nichols.
Loudon was previously married to the late Emmy Award-winning composer Norman Paris, who wrote the theme song for the television game show "I've Got a Secret." He died in 1977.
Playbill News: Memorial Service for Dorothy Loudon to Be Held Nov. 20 (933 words)
Loudon, who created one of the more indelible portraits in musical comedy history with her portrayal of the slatternly, orphan-hating Miss Hannigan in the orignal Annie, was 70.
Dorothy Loudon was born Sept. 17, 1933, in Boston, MA, and went to school at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts.
Loudon was married to Norman Paris, a musician and composer, in 1971.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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