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Encyclopedia > Dorothy Gale
Dorothy Gale

Dorothy with the silver shoes (illustration by W. W. Denslow
First appearance The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900)
Last appearance Right Now !
Created by L. Frank Baum
Information
Species human
Gender female
Age appears 11 (questionable) but is much older
Date of birth probably 1890s, possibly 1880s
Date of death probably immortal as long as she stays in an enchanted country
Occupation adventurer, government liaison
Title Princess
Family Aunt Em, Uncle Henry
Spouse(s) N/A
Children N/A
Relatives Zeb of Hugson's ranch, (second cousin), Uncle Bill Hugson (uncle), unnamed Australians (related through Henry), Susan (indirect descendant), Em (niece of Susan), Dori (niece of Susan)
Address Emerald City palace
Nationality United States

Dorothy Gale is a fictional character, the protagonist of many of the Oz novels by American author L. Frank Baum and best friend of Oz's ruler, Princess Ozma. Dorothy first appears in Baum's classic children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and reappears in most of its sequels. She also is the main character in the classic 1939 movie adaptation of the book. Most recognize Dorothy's iconic appearance, wearing a blue and white checked gingham dress and her hair in pigtails. Ace (given name Dorothy) is a fictional character played by Sophie Aldred in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (650x861, 348 KB) Illustration of Dorothy holding the silver shoes, from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) by W. W. Denslow. ... William Wallace Denslow Copyright notice from Denslows Mother Goose of 1901 - note the use of the word, Rex even at that date William Wallace Denslow (May 5, 1856–March 29, 1915) was an illustrator and caricaturist remembered for his work in collaboration with author L. Frank Baum, especially his... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) is a childrens book written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply... ... Uncle Henry is a fictional character from The Oz Books by L. Frank Baum. ... For other uses, see Emerald City (disambiguation). ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... Oz is a fantasy region containing four countries under the rule of one monarch. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply... Princess Ozma Princess Ozma is a fictional character in the Land of Oz universe created by L. Frank Baum. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) is a childrens book written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gingham is a fabric made from dyed cotton yarn. ... Pigtails is a hairstyle: long hair is parted in the middle and tied on the sides, often curled into ringlets. ...


People who know the Land of Oz only from the 1939 film or from Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz often claim that the main message in Dorothy's experiences can be summed up in the popular sentiment "There's no place like home," but as Dorothy's adventures continue in later books Oz steadily becomes more familiar to her than her homeland of Kansas.[1] Indeed, Dorothy eventually goes to live in an apartment in the Emerald City Palace, but only once Aunt Em and Uncle Henry have settled in a farmhouse on the outskirts of the Emerald City, unable to pay the mortgage on their house in Kansas. This would suggest that the main message is to get away from home without severing ties to one's family. Oz is a fantasy region containing four countries under the rule of one monarch. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Emerald City (disambiguation). ... ... Uncle Henry is a fictional character from The Oz Books by L. Frank Baum. ...

Contents

Sources

An influence on the creation of Dorothy appears to be the Alice books of Lewis Carroll. Although he found their plots incoherent, Baum identified their source of popularity as Alice herself, a child whom the child readers could identify; this influenced his choice of a protagonist.[2] John Tenniel illustrated the first editions of the Alice books. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ...


The name of the character comes from Baum's own niece, Dorothy Louise Gage, who died when she was an infant. Baum's wife was deeply attached to the little girl and deeply grieved by her death, so he inserted her into his story as a memoriam. Elements of her character are derived from Matilda Joslyn Gage, Dorothy's grandmother. Matilda Electa Joslyn Gage (1826-1898) was a suffragist, a Native American activist, an abolitionist, a freethinker, and a prolific author, who was born with a hatred of oppression. Though born in Cicero, New York, Gage maintained residence in Fayetteville, New York for the majority of her life. ...


Dorothy Gage is buried in Evergreen Cemetery (Bloomington, Illinois). Evergreen Cemetery is the burial site of many notable Bloomington-Normal citizens. ...


The classic books

In the Oz books, Dorothy is an orphan raised by her aunt and uncle in the bleak landscape of a Kansas farm. She has a little black dog named Toto. Dorothy and Toto are swept away by a cyclone to the Land of Oz and, much like Alice of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, they enter a lively alternative world filled with talking creatures. In many of the Oz books, Dorothy is the main hero of the stories. She is often seen with her best friend and the ruler of Oz, Princess Ozma. Dorothy's surname, Gale, is first mentioned in Ozma of Oz. It appeared previously in the 1902 play, where it was merely the setup for a joke, the punchline being "that accounts for your breezy manner." Her blue and white gingham dress is well-appreciated by the Munchkins, because only witches and sorceresses wear white, and blue is the favorite color of the Munchkins, which indicates to them that she is a good witch. The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Terry, the Cairn Terrier who played Toto in the film Toto is the name of a fictional dog in L. Frank Baums Oz series of childrens books, and works derived from them. ... This article is about the meteorological phenomenon. ... “Alice in Wonderland” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... Princess Ozma Princess Ozma is a fictional character in the Land of Oz universe created by L. Frank Baum. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... The original 1907 book cover by John R. Neill. ... The Wizard of Oz was a 1902 stage play based on the book by L. Frank Baum, which was originally published in 1900. ... Munchkins are the natives of the fictional Munchkin Country in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ...


Dorothy is a forthright and take-charge character, exhibiting no fear when she slaps the Cowardly Lion, and organizing the Winkies' rescue mission of her friends who have been dismembered by the Winged Monkeys, and more than willing to brazenly talk back to Princess Langwidere's threat to take her head for her collection--"Well, I b'lieve you won't." (Baum began to indicate that Dorothy speaks in a strong prairie accent with Ozma of Oz, and continued to do so throughout the series). This aspect of her character was somewhat lessened with the companionship of Ozma, in whom Baum placed the greater level of wisdom and dignity. Yet even this is complicated by her associations with her second cousin, Zeb of Hugson's Ranch, a rugged, manly boy who does not take well to Oz and cannot think of anything much more interesting than defeating the Munchkins' wrestling champion, which he proves unable to do. Cover of The Cowardly Lion of Oz (1929) by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ... The Winkie Country is a division of the fictional Land of Oz. ... Dismember is a Swedish death metal band, formed in Stockholm in 1988. ... Winged monkeys (often referred to in adaptations and pop culture as flying monkeys) are characters from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, of enough impact between the books and the 1939 movie to have taken their own place in pop culture, regularly referenced in comedic or ironic situations as a source... Princess Langwidere is a fictional character created by L. Frank Baum, who appears in Ozma of Oz, the third book in the Oz series. ... The original 1907 book cover by John R. Neill. ... The term cousin typically refers to the child of ones parents sibling. ... Alternate meanings: see Munchkin (disambiguation) The word munchkin was first coined by L. Frank Baum in his 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ...


In The Emerald City of Oz, Uncle Henry describes Dorothy as "a dreamer, as her dead mother had been." In The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy's desire to return home is primarily motivated by compassion and economics. As she tells Glinda, "My greatest wish now is to get back to Kansas, for Aunt Em will surely think something dreadful has happened to me, and that will make her put on mourning; and unless the crops are better this year than they were last, I am sure Uncle Henry cannot afford it."[3] In Ozma of Oz, Dorothy's desire to return home is not as desperate as in the first book, and again it is her uncle's need for her rather than hers for him that makes her return.[4] Oz is no longer quite the dangerous land that it was in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.[5] Princess Ozma and Dorothy quickly become best friends, and before Dorothy leaves, Ozma crowns her a princess. The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baums fourteen Land of Oz books. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) is a childrens book written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. ... The original 1907 book cover by John R. Neill. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) is a childrens book written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. ... Princess Ozma Princess Ozma is a fictional character in the Land of Oz universe created by L. Frank Baum. ...


Dorothy has several other pets, including her yellow hen, Billina, and her white/pink/purple kitten, Eureka. Popular in crossword puzzles is Dorothy's cow, Imogene, from the 1902 stage version, and implicitly, though unnamed, in the 1910 film. Eric Shanower's novel, The Giant Garden of Oz features a cow named Imogene, but she is of Ozite origin, but otherwise Imogene appears strictly in adaptations. Billina is a hen tossed overboard in a storm with Dorothy Gale in the novel Ozma of Oz, the third Oz book, and a sequel to L. Frank Baums The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Eureka is a white kitten found by Dorothy Gales Uncle Henry, that he gives to her telling her that the name means I have found it!. She is introduced in Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz In a small cage, Dorothy carries Eureka in a small cage on a... The Wizard of Oz was a 1902 stage play based on the book by L. Frank Baum, which was originally published in 1900. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910) was the first film version of L. Frank Baums 1900 novel. ... Age of Bronze issue 12 cover art Eric James Shanower (b. ...


In the sixth Oz book by Baum, The Emerald City of Oz (1910), when Uncle Henry and Aunt Em are unable to pay the mortgage on the new farmhouse built at the end of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy brings them to live in Oz; the bulk of their appearance in the book dealing with her and her aunt and uncle is their tour of Oz, showing them the marvelous, Utopian land in which they have escaped the troubles of Kansas.[6] The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baums fourteen Land of Oz books. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Uncle Henry is a fictional character from The Oz Books by L. Frank Baum. ... ... This article is about the legal mechanism used to secure property in favor of a creditor. ...


Dorothy is a standard character, having at least a cameo role in thirteen of the fourteen Oz books written by L. Frank Baum and is at least a frequent figure in the nineteen that followed by author Ruth Plumly Thompson, getting at least a cameo in all her books except Captain Salt in Oz (in which neither Oz nor any of its inhabitants appear, though they are mentioned). Major subsequent appearances by Dorothy in the "Famous Forty" are in The Lost Princess of Oz, Glinda of Oz, The Royal Book of Oz, Grampa in Oz, The Lost King of Oz, The Wishing Horse of Oz, Ozoplaning with the Wizard of Oz, and The Magical Mimics in Oz. Most of the other books focus on different child protagonists, some Ozite, some from other Nonestican realms, and some from the United States, and as such, her appearances in the main series become more and more limited as it progresses. In Jack Snow's The Magical Mimics in Oz (1946), Ozma places her on the throne of Oz while she is away visiting Lurline's fairy band, demonstrating that she is Ozma's second-in-command. Ruth Plumly Thompson (1891-1976) was an American writer of childrens stories. ... Cover of Captain Salt in Oz. ... The Lost Princess of Oz is the eleventh book set in Oz written by L. Frank Baum. ... Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth Land of Oz book written by childrens author L. Frank Baum. ... The Royal Book of Oz (1921) is the fifteenth Oz book in the Famous Forty, and the first to be written by Ruth Plumly Thompson after L. Frank Baums death. ... Cover of Grampa in Oz. ... Cover of The Lost King of Oz. ... Cover of The Wishing Horse of Oz The Wishing Horse of Oz (1935) is the twenty-ninth of the Oz books created by L. Frank Baum and the fifteenth written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ... Cover of Ozoplaning with the Wizard of Oz. ... Cover of The Magical Mimics in Oz. ... Jack Snow (1907 – July 13, 1956) was a radio writer, as well as a scholar of the works L. Frank Baum. ...


The magic of Oz keeps Dorothy young. In The Lost King of Oz (1925), a Wish Way carries Dorothy to a film set in Hollywood, California. She begins to age very rapidly to her late 20s, making up for the years that have already passed. The Wish Way carries her back to Oz and restores her to her younger self, but she learns then that it would be unwise for her ever to return to the outside world. Baum never states Dorothy's age, but he does state in The Lost Princess of Oz that she is a year younger than Betsy Bobbin and a year older than Trot, whose age was specified as 10 in Ruth Plumly Thompson's The Giant Horse of Oz, a book full of controversial changes. This would make Dorothy eleven years old when she stopped aging. Her actual age would, of course, be much older. A Wish Way is a device that appears in three of the Oz books of Ruth Plumly Thompson, The Royal Book of Oz, The Hungry Tiger of Oz, and The Lost King of Oz. ... In drama, the set (or setting) is the location of a storys action. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... The Lost Princess of Oz is the eleventh book set in Oz written by L. Frank Baum. ... Betsy Bobbin is a character in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... Trot is a fictional character in L. Frank Baums Land of Oz. ... Cover of The Giant Horse of Oz. ...


As such, a cottage industry of Oz books by mostly amateur authors and small publishing houses have been made in which Princess Dorothy of Oz lives on even to our present day. This page is a supplement to List of Oz books featuring published books, often by small press, that are not considered canon Oz books by most readers. ...


Thompson's Oz books have shown a certain intolerance in Dorothy. In The Cowardly Lion of Oz, circus clown Notta Bit More arrives in the Emerald City dressed as a traditional witch, and she immediately starts dumping bucket after bucket of water on him without provocation. In The Wishing Horse of Oz, she participates in some unsavory comments about the dark coloration Gloma and her subjects take on as a disguise, making them somewhat resemble black people. This behavior is not characteristic of Dorothy in Baum's Oz books. In The Patchwork Girl of Oz, she pushes and slaps through crowds of the black Tottenhots to rescue the Scarecrow, whom they are tossing around, but this is more an example of the character's gumption than any sort of prejudice, as she is otherwise kind and polite to the Tottenhots, and accepting that their ways are different from those who dwell in the Emerald City. Cover of The Cowardly Lion of Oz. ... An Avalanche of Absurdities! A Tidal Wave of Tip-Top Tomfoolery! A Hurricane of Howlingly Hilarious High-Jinx and Non-Stop Nutty Nonsense from our Big Bungling Battalion of Boisterous Buffoons! Weve Amassed a Magnificent Myriad of Magical Marvelous Mirth Makers, those Matchless Motley-Mugged Merry Masters of Mad... Cover of The Wishing Horse of Oz The Wishing Horse of Oz (1935) is the twenty-ninth of the Oz books created by L. Frank Baum and the fifteenth written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... The Patchwork Girl of Oz by L. Frank Baum, is a childrens novel, the seventh set in the Land of Oz. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ...


The authorized sequels of Sherwood Smith, The Emerald Wand of Oz and Trouble Under Oz, center on children Dori and Em, who live with their Aunt Susan. All three are indirect descendants of Dorothy, though their specific relationship to her has not been revealed. Sherwood Smith writes fantasy and science fiction for young adult as well as adults. ... The Emerald Wand of Oz is a 2005 book by Sherwood Smith and is a continuation of the Oz series that was started by L. Frank Baum in 1900. ... Trouble Under Oz is a 2006 novel by Sherwood Smith. ...


The 1908, 1910 and 1914 movies

In 1908 L. Frank Baum adapted his early Oz novels as The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays, with Romola Remus as Dorothy. This was followed by The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, a motion picture short that Otis Turner, one of the directors of Fairylogue, made without Baum as part of a contract fulfillment. In this film, Dorothy was played by Bebe Daniels. It was followed by two sequels (the same year), Dorothy and the Scarecrow in Oz and The Land of Oz, both of which included Dorothy, but whether Daniels participated is unknown. Baum subsequently loosely adapted The Wonderful Wizard of Oz into a 1914 motion picture directed by J. Farrell MacDonald titled His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz with Violet MacMillan as Dorothy. The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays was an early attempt to bring L. Frank Baums Oz books to the screen. ... Romola Remus (later Dunlap) (April 7, 1900-February 17, 1987) portrayed Dorothy Gale in the multimedia stage/film production, The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays, in which she worked directly with author L. Frank Baum. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910) was the first film version of L. Frank Baums 1900 novel. ... Otis Turner (29 November 1862 – 28 March 1918), was an American film director, screenwriter and film producer. ... Bebe Daniels (January 14, 1901 - March 16, 1971) was an American actress. ... Joseph Farrell MacDonald (1875-1952) is an American Veteran Actor who Played Pop Shannon in Superman and the Mole Men. ... His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz is a 1914 film production, directed by J. Farrell McaDonald and written and produced by L. Frank Baum. ... Violet MacMillan (March 4, 1887 - December 29, 1953), was an American actress in Broadway theatre productions, vaudeville, and silent motion pictures. ...


Dorothy does not appear in The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1914), although some film books claim that Mildred Harris, who had yet to sign her contract with The Oz Film Manufacturing Company, played the role. The Patchwork Girl of Oz was a 1914 film made by L. Frank Baums Oz Film Company. ... Mildred Harris Mildred Harris (November 29, 1901 - July 20, 1944) was a notable actress of the silent film era. ... The Oz Film Manufacturing Company was an independent film studio from 1914-1915. ...


The 1925 movie

Dorothy Dwan portrayed Dorothy in the 1925 film Wizard of Oz. In this film, Aunt Em (Mary Carr) informs her on her eighteenth birthday that she was left on their doorstep and is really a princess of Oz destined to marry Prince Kynd, who has currently lost the throne to Prime Minister Kruel, in a storyline similar to that of His Majesty the Scarecrow of Oz, only with Dorothy as love interest. Dorothy Dwan (26 April 1906 – 17 March 1981), was an American film actress. ... The Wizard of Oz (1925), directed by Larry Semon, who also appears in a comic role (and featuring a young Oliver Hardy), was the first major filmed production of the Wizard of Oz, done as a silent film. ... Mary Carr (14 March 1874 – 24 June 1973), was an American film actress. ... The love interest is a stock character, an object of romantic admiration and attraction for the principal character(s), or heroes. ...

The 1939 movie

In the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy was played by Judy Garland. Garland received a Special Juvenile Academy Award for her performance. Garland was sixteen years old when she performed the role, with a brace on her chest to make her look more youthful. Her age is never specified in the film, but around the studio, Dorothy Gale was officially twelve years old. The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...


This Dorothy lacks much of the forthrightness and gumption of Baum's Dorothy, sometimes becoming a damsel in distress figure. A poster for The Perils of Pauline (1914). ...


Also, Oz in the film is merely her dream, not a place to literally escape to when things get rough and bring along her relatives.

Modern works

One of the closest adaptations of the novel is the Turkish film Ayşecik ve Sihirli Cüceler Rüyalar Ülkesinde, in which Dorothy is the recurring character Ayşecik portrayed by seventeen year-old child star Zeynep Değirmencioğlu. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The term child actor is generally applied to a child acting in motion pictures or television, but also to an adult who began his or her acting career as a child; to avoid confusion the latter is also called a former child actor. ... Zeynep DeÄŸirmencioÄŸlu (born September 12, 1954 in Istanbul, Turkey) is a Turkish actress. ...


For the 1975 Broadway musical The Wiz, Dorothy (originated in The Wiz by Stephanie Mills) is reimagined as a young African-American girl, though most of her other characteristics, as well as the general plot of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, remain intact. The story was altered for the 1978 Motown/Universal film adaptation of The Wiz, in which Dorothy (portrayed by Diana Ross) is a shy twenty-four year old schoolteacher who has never traveled far beyond the neighborhood she grew up in. This Dorothy's adventures in Oz force her to mature, as is the case for most versions of the Wizard of Oz story, although in this case, Dorothy is made to overcome a case of arrested development. Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... Stephanie Mills (born March 22, 1957 in Harlem, New York) is an African American R&B and soul singer and former Broadway star. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Motown Record Company, L.P., also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label specializing in the musical genres of R&B, pop, soul music, and hip-hop music. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... The Wiz is a 1978 American musical film (see 1978 in film) produced by Motown Productions and Universal Pictures, and released by Universal on October 24, 1978. ... For the author-illustrator, see Diana Ross (author). ... Developmental disorders are disorders that occur at some stage in a childs development, often retarding the development. ...


Philip José Farmer's 1982 science-fiction novel A Barnstormer in Oz tells the story of hotshot aviator Henry "Hank" Stover — who is not at all surprised one beautiful spring day in 1923 when he flies his Curtiss Jenny biplane through a strange green cloud and finds himself in a land populated by small people where animals talk and magic works. Hank knows right away that he is in Oz because his mother, Dorothy Gale-Stover, had been there back in 1890 and later told him (and L. Frank Baum) of her experiences. Farmer's premise is that Dorothy only visited Oz once and told her story to a journalist called Frank Baum. This journalist would later create a series of books from Dorothy's only adventure in Oz. Like many Oz novels for adults, Farmer's Oz is a darker, more threatening place and in this case it is on the brink of both a civil war and an invasion by the United States Army. Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... A Barnstormer in Oz is a 1982 novel by Philip José Farmer and is based on the setting and characters of L. Frank Baums The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... The Curtiss JN-4 biplane is possibly North Americas most famous World War I airplane. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply... A civil war is a war in which parties within the same culture, society or nationality fight against each other for the control of political power. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


In 1985, Walter Murch directed the movie Return to Oz distributed by Walt Disney Pictures starring Fairuza Balk as Dorothy. The plot was a combination of Ozma of Oz and The Marvelous Land of Oz. The film was not a wide success on its original release, although it remains a cult classic among fans of the book and some American families. Walter Murch speaking 13 March 2005 Walter Scott Murch (born July 12, 1943) is an Academy Award–winning film editor/sound mixer. ... For other uses, including the 1964 film of the same name, see Return to Oz (disambiguation). ... Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the... Fairuza Alejandra Balk (born May 21, 1974) is an American film actress. ... The original 1907 book cover by John R. Neill. ... The Marvelous Land of Oz, commonly shortened to The Land of Oz, published in 1904, is the second of L. Frank Baums books set in the Land of Oz, and the sequel to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


In the 1980s Japanese animated-version of the Wizard of Oz (Oz no Mahōtsukai), Dorothy is depicted with reddish-brown hair, much like the movie, but does not have pig-tails. Her blue and white farm dress slightly differs from how it was described in the books (in fact, it looks quite Alice in Wonderland-esque), but her anime design makes her appear young. She wears white "magic shoes". Oz no Mahōtsukai ) is an anime adaption of The Wizard of Oz which ran on the Japanese network TV Tokyo from October 6, 1986–September 28, 1987. ...


Geoff Ryman's evocation of Dorothy's childhood in Kansas is the central thread of his 1992 novel Was. His Dorothy (her surname spelled Gael) is given into the care of her aunt and uncle, Henry and Emma Gulch in Zeandale, Manhattan in 1875. Years of deprivation and abuse at their hands turn her into a disturbed young adult, retreating into a fantasy of her own past: the land of "Was". She encounters — and subsequently inspires — L. Frank Baum in a Kansas schoolroom. Alongside this theme are scenes from the infamous life of Judy Garland before, during and after her portrayal of the character in the 1939 movie, and the story of a homosexual man's investigation of the life of the "real" Dorothy as he combats AIDS. Geoffrey Charles Ryman (born 1951) is a writer of science fiction, fantasy and slipstream fiction. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


In the video for Blues Traveler's 1994 hit song Run-Around, Dorothy is featured as an attractive young adult woman, trying to get into a club where the band is performing. She is portrayed by actress Diana Marquis. Blues Traveler is an American alternative rock/blues rock/jam band formed in Princeton, New Jersey, in 1983. ... Run-Around is a song written by the jam band Blues Traveler, featured on the 1994 album Four. ...


While not exactly a villain, Dorothy is clearly not the hero in Gregory Maguire's revisionist 1995 novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West. She is only involved in the drama towards the end of the novel and her innocence and unyielding desire to return back home to Kansas result in much trouble for the main character of the book, Elphaba. Gregory Maguire (born June 9, 1954 in Albany, New York) is an American author. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Wicked, or Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, is a parallel novel by Gregory Maguire. ... Elphaba is the name given to the Wicked Witch of the West in Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire, as well as in the Broadway adaptation, Wicked. ...


In both Baum's original book and Maguire's revision, Dorothy spends her first night in Oz at the house of a munchkin farmer named Boq. In the latter, it is revealed that the two discussed the etymology of Dorothy's name. Boq finds it interesting that Dorothy's name is the reverse of her land's "King" Theodore — which means "gift of the gods" — and that Dorothy means "goddess of gifts." Spoiler warning: Boq is a character in author Gregory Maguires 1995 novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West. ... Etymologies redirects here. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...


While Dorothy is present in the popular Broadway musical Wicked (based on Maguire's book), she is never actually seen; when the main characters interact with her, they speak into direction of the wings, or into a trapdoor, as if she is sitting offstage and out of the view of the audience. Dorothy does appear on the stage during a pivotal scene, but the audience sees only her silhouette. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Wicked is a Tony award-winning American musical produced by Universal Pictures with music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, and a book by Winnie Holzman. ...


Dorothy features somewhat more prominently in Son of a Witch, Maguire's 2005 sequel to Wicked. In that novel, Elphaba's (possible) son Liir is briefly infatuated with Dorothy, and joins her party on their return to the Emerald City. Maguire portrays Dorothy as good-natured, practical, single-minded and slightly boring. Son of a Witch book cover Son of a Witch is a sequel to Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, and the fifth revisionist novel written by Gregory Maguire. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Liir (pronouced leer) is a supporting character in Gregory Maguires novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, and the protagonist of its sequel, Son of a Witch. ... For other uses, see Emerald City (disambiguation). ...


The Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Come True (1995) starred Jewel as Dorothy and Nathan Lane as the Cowardly Lion. This was a benefit performance for the Children's Defense Fund. Jewel on the cover of her 2003 album 0304 Jewel Kilcher (born May 23, 1974) is a singer-songwriter better known by her stage name, Jewel. ... Nathan Lane (born February 3, 1956) is a Tony Award and Emmy Award-winning actor of the stage and screen. ... Cover of The Cowardly Lion of Oz (1929) by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ... The Childrens Defense Fund is a child advocacy group. ...


A little known re-telling of The Wizard of Oz (1995) made for British channel Five starred Denise van Outen as Dorothy and featured a cameo appearance by Zoe Salmon of Blue Peter fame. The Wizard of Oz was a 1995 TV film made for British channel Five. ... 5 (five) is the natural number following 4 and preceding 6. ... Denise van Outen (born May 27, 1974, Basildon, Essex, England, UK) is a British television hostess and stage actress. ... Zöe Salmon is a British television presenter, currently presenting on the childrens television show, Blue Peter. ... For other uses, see Blue Peter (disambiguation). ...


Todd McFarlane re imagined the story in the Twisted Land of Oz in which none of the characters were innocent. Dorothy was a straight A student, but naive socially. Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ...


In the 2005 made-for-television movie The Muppets' Wizard of Oz Dorothy was portrayed as a gifted teenage singer (played by Ashanti) who wanted nothing more than to get out of Kansas and sing with the Muppets Star Hunt tour. Promotional poster The Muppets Wizard of Oz, an original made-for-television movie, aired May 20, 2005 as a special Friday night edition of ABCs The Wonderful World of Disney. ... Ashanti Shequoiya Douglas (born October 13, 1980) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, actress, dancer, model, and fashion designer who rose to fame in the early 2000s. ...


An adult Dorothy, along with Alice Liddell from Lewis Carroll's (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland) and J. M. Barrie's Wendy Darling (from Peter Pan), is a featured character in the 2006 erotic adult comic book Lost Girls by Alan Moore and Melinda Gebbie, set in 1913. Dorothy, Alice, Wendy, Susan Pevensie (from The Chronicles of Narnia) also feature in the comic The Oz/Wonderland Chronicles, set in 2005. Unlike the other two characters, Dorothy is based on her movie counterpart, who stopped believing in Oz. John Tenniel illustrated the first editions of the Alice books. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... “Alice in Wonderland” redirects here. ... For the British Army surgeon, see James Barry (surgeon). ... Wendy Moira Angela Darling is a fictional heroine and main female protagonist in the Peter Pan stories by J.M. Barrie, in all their theatrical, literary, and motion picture adaptations. ... This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Lost Girls is an erotic graphic novel depicting the sexual adventures of three important female fictional characters of the late 19th and early 20th Century, namely Alice from Alices Adventures in Wonderland, Dorothy Gale from The Wizard of Oz, and Wendy Darling from Peter Pan. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Melinda Gebbie is a comic book artist, partner of Alan Moore. ... Susan Pevensie is one of the major characters in C. S. Lewiss Chronicles of Narnia series. ... Narnia redirects here. ...


References

  1. ^ Jack Zipes, When Dreams Came True: Classical Fairy Tales and Their Tradition, p 159 ISBN 0-415-92151-1
  2. ^ L. Frank Baum, Michael Patrick Hearn, The Annotated Wizard of Oz, p 38, ISBN 0-517-500868 "Singularly enough, we have no recognized author of fairy literature between Andersen's day and that of Lewis Carroll, the quaint and clever old clergyman who recorded Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Carroll's method of handling fairies was as whimsical as Andersen's was reverential, yet it is but fair to state that the children loved Alice better than any prince or princess that Andersen ever created. The secret of Alice's success lay in the fact that she was a real child, and any normal child could sympathize with her all through her adventures. The story may often bewilder the little one--for it is bound to bewilder us, having neither plot nor motive in its relation--but Alice is doing something every moment, and doing something strange and marvelous, too; so the child follows her with rapturous delight." http://web.archive.org/web/20060524200133/mywebpages.comcast.net/scottandrewh/mft.htm
  3. ^ The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Chapter 23.
  4. ^ Peter Glassman, "Afterword," p 271 L. Frank Baum, Ozma of Oz, ISBN 0-688-06632-1
  5. ^ Michael O. Riley, Oz and Beyond: The Fantasy World of L. Frank Baum, p 137, ISBN 0-7006-0832-X
  6. ^ Jack Zipes, When Dreams Came True: Classical Fairy Tales and Their Tradition, p 178-9 ISBN 0-415-92151-1

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dorothy Gale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (756 words)
Dorothy is a standard character in the fourteen Oz books written by L. Frank Baum and is at least a frequent figure in the nineteen that followed by author Ruth Plumly Thompson.
His Dorothy (her surname spelled Gael) is given into the care of her aunt and uncle, Henry and Emma Gulch in Zeandale, Manhatten in 1875.
While Dorothy is present in the popular Broadway musical Wicked (based on Maguire's book), she is never actually seen; when the main characters interact with her, they speak into direction of the wings, as if she is sitting offstage and out of the view of the audience.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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