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Encyclopedia > Dorothy Fields
Dorothy Fields was immortalised on a USPS postage stamp.
Dorothy Fields was immortalised on a USPS postage stamp.

Dorothy Fields (July 15, 1905 - March 28, 1974) was an Jewish-American librettist and lyricist who wrote well over 400 songs for Broadway musicals and films. She had great talent to match colloquial every–day speech to complex scores, and was, along with Ann Ronell, Dana Suesse, and Kay Swift one of the first successful Hollywood and Tin Pan Alley female composers or librettists. Image File history File links Dorothyfieldsstamp. ... Image File history File links Dorothyfieldsstamp. ... A USPS truck in San Francisco A smaller truck (a Long Life Vehicle or LLV) used in suburban areas This article describes the United States Postal Service. ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent or religion who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ... A libretto is the complete body of words used in an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, sacred or secular oratorio and cantata, musical, and ballet. ... Lyrics are the words in songs. ... Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... Ann Ronell (December 28, 1906 or 1908 Omaha, Nebraska - December 25, 1993) was a composer and lyricist best known for the jazz standard Willow Weep For Me (1932). ... Kay Swift (1897–1993) was an American composer of popular and classical music who was first woman to score a complete musical. ...


Dorothy Fields was born in Allenhurst, New Jersey and grew up in New York City. Her father, Lew Fields, was an immigrant from Poland and well-known vaudeville comedian and later became a Broadway producer. Her career as a professional songwriter took off in 1928, when Jimmy McHugh, who had seen some of her early work, invited her to provide some lyrics for him. Fields and McHugh teamed up until 1935. Songs from this period include "I Can't Give You Anything But Love, Baby" and "On The Sunny Side of the Street". Allenhurst is a Walsh Act borough located in Monmouth County, New Jersey. ... Nickname: The Big Apple Motto: Official website: City of New York Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... Vaudeville is a style of multi-act theatre which flourished in North America from the 1880s through the 1920s. ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jimmy McHugh (July 10, 1894 - May 23, 1969), was one of the greatest and most prolific songwriters during the 1920s-1950s. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In the mid-1930s, she started to write lyrics for films and collaborated with other composers, including Jerome Kern. With Kern, she worked on the movie version of Roberta, and also on their greatest success, Swing Time. The song "The Way You Look Tonight" earned the Fields/Kern team an Academy Award for the best song in 1936. // Events and trends A public speech by Benito Mussolini, founder of the Fascist movement The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the global depression. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American popular composer. ... Roberta is a 1935 musical, with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Otto Harbach, starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. ... This article is about the film. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


She returned to New York and worked again on Broadway shows, but now as a librettist, first with Arthur Schwartz on Stars In Your Eyes. In the 1940s, she teamed up with her brother, Herbert Fields, with whom she wrote the books for three Cole Porter shows: Let's Face It, Something For The Boys, and Mexican Hayride. Together, they wrote the book for Annie Get Your Gun, a musical inspired by the life of Annie Oakley. They had intended for Jerome Kern to write the music, but when he died, Irving Berlin was brought in. The show, which included the songs "There's No Business Like Show Business" and "They Say It's Wonderful," was a success and ran for 1,147 performances. Arthur Schwartz (November 25, 1900 - September 3, 1984) was an American composer of popular music. ... // Events and trends World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrination, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atomic bomb. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Indiana. ... Lets Face It is an album by The Mighty Mighty Bosstones. ... Annie Get Your Gun is a stage musical loosely based on the life of sharpshooter Annie Oakley. ... Annie Oakley, between 1885 and 1901. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989), born Israel Isidore Baline, in Tyumen, Russia (or possibly Mogilev, Belarus), was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ...


In the 1950s, her biggest success was the show Redhead (1959), which won five Tony Awards, including one for "Best Musical." When she started collaborating with Cy Coleman in the 1960s, her career took a new turn. She easily adapted to the new style of music; their first work together was Sweet Charity. Her last hit was from their second collaboration in 1973, Seesaw. Its title was "It's Not Where You Start, It's Where You Finish". 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater. ... Cy Coleman (1929 - 2004) was an American composer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Sweet Charity, based on Federico Fellinis screenplay for Nights of Cabiria, is a 1966 musical show directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Seesaw is a musical comedy based on William Gibsons play, Two for the Seesaw which ran on Broadway in the late 1950s. ...


Dorothy Fields died of a heart attack on March 28, 1974 in New York City at the age of 68. March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ...


External links

  • The Dorothy Fields Website, a British-based fan website containing multitudes of information on the songwriter.
  • IMDb: Dorothy Fields, primarily a filmography
  • Dorothy Fields at the Songwriters Hall of Fame

  Results from FactBites:
 
Great Performances . Artists . Dorothy Fields | PBS (360 words)
Dorothy Fields was the first woman to break into the all-male club of American songwriters.
Fields, Dorothy (July 15, 1905 - Mar. 28, 1974), lyricist and librettist, was born in Allenhurst, N.J., the daughter of Lew M. Fields and Rose Harris.
Dorothy Fields graduated in 1923 from the Benjamin Franklin School for Girls in New York City, where she excelled at English, drama, and basketball, and had her poems published in the school's literary magazine.
Dorothy Fields - definition of Dorothy Fields in Encyclopedia (453 words)
Dorothy Fields (July 15, 1905 - March 28, 1974) was an American librettist and lyricist who wrote well over 400 songs for Broadway musicals and films.
Dorothy Fields was born in Allenhurst, New Jersey and grew up in New York City.
Her father, Lew Fields, was a well-known Vaudeville comedian and later became a Broadway producer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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