FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Doris Lessing
Doris Lessing

Doris Lessing at lit.cologne 2006
Born Doris May Tayler
22 October 1919 (1919-10-22) (age 88)
Kermanshah, Persia
Occupation Writer
Nationality British
Literary movement Modernism, Science fiction
Notable award(s) Nobel Prize in Literature
2007
Spouse(s) Frank Charles Wisdom (1939-1943)
Gottfried Anton Nicolai Lessing (1945-1949)

Doris Lessing CH OBE (born Doris May Tayler in Kermanshah, Persia,[1] on 22 October 1919[2]) is a British writer, author of works such as the novels The Grass is Singing and The Golden Notebook. Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto: Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« 1 Independence, freedom, Islamic Republic Anthem: SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Â² Capital (and largest city) Tehran Official languages Persian, Constitutional status for regional languages such as Azeri and Kurdish [1] Demonym Iranian Government Islamic Republic  -  Supreme Leader  -  President... This article is about work. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... Idries Shah (16 June 1924–23 November 1996) (Persian: ادریس شاه), also known as Idris Shah, né Sayyid Idris al-Hashimi (Arabic: سيد إدريس الهاشمي), was an author in the Naqshbandi sufist tradition on works ranging from psychology and spirituality to travelogues and culture studies, and was descended from the revered family, the Sadaat of... Olive Schreiner (Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner) (March 24, 1855 – December 11, 1920) was a South African writer. ... La Beauvoir redirects here; also see: Beauvoir (disambiguation). ... Jean Paul Sartre Jean-Paul Sartre (June 21, 1905–April 15, 1980) was a French existentialist philosopher, dramatist, novelist and critic. ... Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Brontë - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Christina Stead (1902 - 1983) was an Australian novelist and short-story writer noted for her satirical wit and psychological penetration. ... David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 – 2 March 1930) was an English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism, and personal letters. ... Stendhal. ... For the American writer, see Virginia Euwer Wolff. ... Mikhail Afanasievich Bulgakov (Russian: Михаил Афанасьевич Булгаков; May 15 [O.S. May 3] 1891, Kiev – March 10, 1940, Moscow) was a Russian novelist and playwright of the first half of the 20th century. ... William Olaf Stapledon (May 10, 1886 – September 6, 1950) was a British philosopher and author of several influential works of science fiction. ... Alexandra Fuller (born 1969) is an English author. ... Elaine Showalter (1941- ) is an American literary critic, feminist, and writer on cultural and social issues. ... Octavia Estelle Butler (June 22, 1947 — February 24, 2006) was an American science fiction writer, one of very few African-American women in the field. ... Rachel Blau DuPlessis (born 1941), American poet and essayist, is known as a feminist critic and scholar with a special interest in modernist and contemporary poetry. ... Erica Jong (née Mann, born March 26, 1942, in New York City, New York) is an American author and educator. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... Joanna Russ (born February 22, 1937), American writer and feminist, is the author of a number of works of Science Fiction (among other types of writing), including The Female Man, an aclaimed SF novel and pioneering meditation on how differing societies might produce very different versions of the same person... Marge Piercy (born March 31, 1936) is an American poet, novelist, and social activist. ... Joyce Carol Oates (born June 16, 1938) is an American author and the Roger S. Berlind 52 Professor in the Humanities with the Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University, where she has taught since 1978. ... Margaret Eleanor Atwood, OC (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian writer. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The Grass is Singing is the first novel, published in 1950, by British Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing. ... The Golden Notebook is a 1962 novel by British author Doris Lessing. ...


In 2007, Lessing won the Nobel Prize in Literature. She was described by the Swedish Academy as "that epicist of the female experience, who with scepticism, fire and visionary power has subjected a divided civilisation to scrutiny".[3] Lessing is the eleventh woman to win the prize in its 106-year history,[4][5] and also the oldest person ever to win the literature award.[6] René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... This article is about Svenska Akademien. ...

Contents

Background

Lessing was born to Captain Alfred Tayler and Emily Maude Tayler (née McVeagh), who were both English and of British nationality.[7] Her father, who had lost a leg during his service in World War I, met his future wife, a nurse, at the Royal Free Hospital where he was recovering from his amputation.[8][9] The English are an ethnic group originating in the lowlands of Great Britain and are descendent primarily from the Anglo-Saxons, the Celts with minor influences from the Scandanavians and other groups. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Royal Free Hospital is a large and modern London teaching hospital, United Kingdom. ... Partial hand amputation Amputation is the removal of a body extremity by trauma or surgery. ...


Alfred Tayler moved his family to Kermanshah, in Persia (now Iran), in order to take up a job as a clerk for the Imperial Bank of Persia and it was here that Doris was born in 1919.[10][11] The family then moved to the British colony of Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 1925 to farm maize, when her father purchased around one thousand acres of bush. Lessing's mother attempted to lead an Edwardian life style amongst the rough environment, which would have been easy had the family been wealthy; it was not. The farm was not successful and failed to deliver the wealth the Taylers had expected.[2] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... The Imperial Bank of Persia was an Iranian bank it was established in 1889 with a royal charter from Queen Victoria, and a concession from the government of Persia, making it the state bank of Persia. ... Flag Anthem God Save the Queen Capital Salisbury Language(s) English Government Constitutional monarchy Monarch  - 1923-1936 George V  - 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1952 George VI  - 1952-1980¹ Elizabeth II Governor  - 1923-1928 Sir John Robert Chancellor  - 1959-1969² Sir Humphrey Gibbs  - 1979-1980 Lord Soames Premier, then Prime Minister... This article is about the maize plant. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It is sometimes extended to include the period to the start of World War I in 1914 or even the end of the war in 1918. ...


Lessing was educated at the Dominican Convent High School, a Roman Catholic convent all-girls school in Salisbury (now Harare).[12] Lessing left school aged 14, and thereafter was self-educated. She left home at 15 and worked as a nursemaid, and it was around this time that Lessing started reading material on politics and sociology that her employer gave her to read.[9] She began writing around this time. In 1937, Lessing moved to Salisbury to work as a telephone operator, and she soon married her first husband, Frank Wisdom, with whom she had two children, before the marriage ended in 1943.[9] Dominican Convent High School. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A Beguine convent in Amsterdam. ... A single-sex school is a school that only accepts boys or girls exclusively. ... Motto: Pamberi Nekushandria Vanhu (Forward with Service to the People) Map of Zimbabwe showing the location of Harare. ... A nursemaid is a girl or woman hired by an individual family to take care of the child or children of that family. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the scientific or systematic study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... A telephone operator at work on a private switchboard A telephone operator is either a person who provides assistance to a telephone caller, usually in the placing of operator assisted telephone calls such as calls from a pay phone, collect calls (called reversed-charge calls in the UK), calls which...


Following her divorce, Lessing was drawn to the Left Book Club, a communist book club[2], and it was here that she met her second husband, Gottfried Lessing. They were married shortly after she joined the group and had a child together, before the marriage also ended in divorce in 1949. Gottfried Lessing later became the East German ambassador to Uganda, and was murdered in the 1979 rebellion against Idi Amin Dada.[9] The Left Book Club, founded in 1936, was a key left-wing institution of the late 1930s and 1940s in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... A book sales club is a subscription-based method of selling and purchasing books. ... This article is about the state which existed from 1949 to 1990. ... For other uses, see Rebel (disambiguation) and Rebellion (disambiguation). ... Idi Amin Dada (mid-1920s[1] – 16 August 2003) was an army officer and president of Uganda. ...


Writing career

Because of her campaigning against nuclear arms and South African apartheid, Lessing was banned from that country and from Rhodesia for many years.[13] Lessing moved to London with her youngest son in 1949 and it was at this time her first novel, The Grass Is Singing, was published.[2] Her breakthrough work, written in 1962, was The Golden Notebook.[11] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Grass is Singing is the first novel, published in 1950, by British Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing. ... The Golden Notebook is a 1962 novel by British author Doris Lessing. ...


In 1984, she attempted to publish two novels under a pseudonym, Jane Somers, to demonstrate the difficulty new authors faced in trying to break into print. The novels were declined by Lessing's UK publisher, but accepted by another English publisher, Michael Joseph, and in the US by Alfred A. Knopf.[14] For the publishing company of this name, see Pearson PLC Michael Joseph (1914-1981) was a British author on cats, among other subjects. ... Colophon of the publisher Alfred A. Knopf. ...


She declined a damehood, but accepted a Companion of Honour at the end of 1999 for "conspicuous national service".[15] She has also been made a Companion of Literature by the Royal Society of Literature.[16] For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order (decoration). ... The Royal Society of Literature is the senior literary organisation in Britain. External link The Royal Society of Literature Categories: Literature stubs | Literature of the United Kingdom ...


On 11 October 2007, Lessing was announced as the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature.[17] At 87, she is the oldest person to have received the literature prize[18] and the third oldest Nobel Laureate in any category.[19][20] She also stands as only the eleventh woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature by the Swedish Academy in its 106-year history.[21] She told reporters outside her home "I've won all the prizes in Europe, every bloody one, so I'm delighted to win them all. It's a royal flush."[22] In a 2008 interview for the BBC's Front Row, she stated that increased media interest following the award had left her without time for writing.[23] is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... This article is about Svenska Akademien. ... For the article on the WWII B-29 of the same name, see Straight Flush. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Front Row is a radio programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4. ...


Literary style

Lessing's fiction is commonly divided into three distinct phases: the Communist theme (1944-1956), when she was writing radically on social issues (and returned to in The Good Terrorist (1985)), the psychological theme (1956-1969), and after that the Sufi theme, which was explored in a science fiction setting in the Canopus series (see below). She later converted to sufism, saying her life and marxist worldview lacked a spiritual dimension. This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Sufism (Arabic: ‎ - taṣawwuf, Kurdish Sufayeti, Persian: صوفی‌گری, sufigari, Turkish: tasavvuf), is generally understood by scholars to be the inner or mystical dimension of Islam. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Lessing's switch to science fiction was not popular with many critics. For example, in the New York Times in 1982 John Leonard wrote in reference to The Making of the Representative for Planet 8 that "One of the many sins for which the 20th century will be held accountable is that it has discouraged Mrs. Lessing.... She now propagandizes on behalf of our insignificance in the cosmic razzmatazz." To which Lessing replied: "What they didn't realize was that in science fiction is some of the best social fiction of our time. I also admire the classic sort of science fiction, like Blood Music, by Greg Bear. He's a great writer."[24] Unlike some authors primarily known for their mainstream work, she has never hesitated to admit that she writes science fiction. She was Writer Guest of Honour at the 1987 World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), and made a well-received speech in which she described her science-fictional Memoirs of a Survivor as "an attempt at an autobiography."[25] John Leonard (born February 25, 1939) is an American literary, TV, film and cultural critic. ... The Making of the Representative for Planet 8 (ISBN 0586056548) is one of a set of unconventional SF novels written by Nobel Prize-winner Doris Lessing. ... Blood Music is a science fiction novel by Greg Bear (ISBN 0-7434-4496-5). ... Gregory Dale Bear (born August 20, 1951) is a science fiction author. ... Look up mainstream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The 45th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Conspiracy 87, was held 27 August – 1 September 1987 at the Metropole Hotel and Brighton Conference Centre in Brighton, England. ... It has been suggested that World Science Fiction Society be merged into this article or section. ... Memoirs of a survivor is a novel by Doris Lessing. ...


Her novel The Golden Notebook is considered a feminist classic by some scholars, but notably not by the author herself, who later wrote that its theme of mental breakdowns as a means of healing and freeing one's self from illusions had been overlooked by critics. She also regretted that critics failed to appreciate the exceptional structure of the novel. As she explains in Walking in the Shade Lessing modelled Molly, to an extent, on her good friend Joan Rodker, the daughter of the author and publisher John Rodker.[26] The Golden Notebook is a 1962 novel by British author Doris Lessing. ... Feminists redirects here. ... John Rodker (18 December 1894 – 6 October 1955) was a British writer, modernist poet, and publisher of some of the major modernist figures. ...


Lessing does not like the idea of being pigeon-holed as a feminist author. When asked why, she replies:

What the feminists want of me is something they haven't examined because it comes from religion. They want me to bear witness. What they would really like me to say is, 'Ha, sisters, I stand with you side by side in your struggle toward the golden dawn where all those beastly men are no more.' Do they really want people to make oversimplified statements about men and women? In fact, they do. I've come with great regret to this conclusion.

Doris Lessing, The New York Times, 25 July 1982[10] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...

When asked about which of her books she considers most important, Lessing chose the Canopus in Argos science fiction series. These books show, from many different perspectives, an advanced society's efforts at forced evolution (also see Progressor and Uplift). The Canopus series is based partly on Sufi concepts, to which Lessing was introduced by Idries Shah. Earlier works of "inner space" fiction like Briefing for a Descent into Hell and Memoirs of a Survivor also connect to this theme. Canopus in Argos is a series of science fiction novels written by Doris Lessing. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Progressors in sci-fi literature are people (or other sentient beings) of an advanced space-faring civilization who progress less technologically advanced civilizations and races, i. ... The Uplift Universe is a fictional universe created by science fiction writer David Brin. ... Sufism (Arabic: ‎ - taṣawwuf, Kurdish Sufayeti, Persian: صوفی‌گری, sufigari, Turkish: tasavvuf), is generally understood by scholars to be the inner or mystical dimension of Islam. ... Idries Shah (16 June 1924–23 November 1996) (Persian: ادریس شاه), also known as Idris Shah, né Sayyid Idris al-Hashimi (Arabic: سيد إدريس الهاشمي), was an author in the Naqshbandi sufist tradition on works ranging from psychology and spirituality to travelogues and culture studies, and was descended from the revered family, the Sadaat of... Memoirs of a survivor is a novel by Doris Lessing. ...


Archive

Lessing's largest literary archive is held by the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, at the University of Texas at Austin. The 45 archival boxes of Lessing's materials at the Ransom Center represent nearly all of her extant manuscripts and typescripts through 1999. Original material for Lessing's early books is assumed not to exist because Lessing kept none of her early manuscripts.[27] Other institutions, such as McFarlin Library at the University of Tulsa hold smaller collections.[28] The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center is an archive at the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in the collection of literary and other cultural artifacts from the United States, Great Britain, and France. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... The University of Tulsa is a private, comprehensive university awarding bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ...


Awards

The Somerset Maugham Award is a British literary prize given each May by the Society of Authors. ... The Prix Médicis is a French literary award given each year in November. ... The Alfred Toepfer Stiftung F.V.S. is a German foundation established in 1931 by the Hamburg merchant Alfred Toepfer. ... The WH Smith Literary Award is an award founded in 1959 by British high street retailer W H Smith. ... Founded in 1919, the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes are among the oldest and most prestigious book prizes awarded for literature written in the English Language. ... Since 1980, the Los Angeles Times has awarded a set of annual book prizes. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Royal Society of Literature is the senior literary organisation in Britain. External link The Royal Society of Literature Categories: Literature stubs | Literature of the United Kingdom ... The Prince of Asturias Awards (Spanish: Premios Príncipe de Asturias, Asturian: Premios Príncipe dAsturies) is a series of annual prizes given in Spain by the Fundación Príncipe de Asturias to individuals, entities, organizations or others from around the world who make notable achievements in the... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart...

Works

  • The Grass is Singing (1950)
  • This Was the Old Chief's Country (collection) (1951)
  • The Children of Violence Series (1952-1969):
    • Martha Quest (1952)
    • Five (short stories) (1953)
    • A Proper Marriage (1954)
    • A Ripple from the Storm (1958)
    • A woman on a roof (1963)
    • Landlocked (1965)
    • The Four-Gated City (1969)
  • Five Short Novels (1953)
  • Through the Tunnel (1955)
  • Going Home (memoir) (1957)
  • The Habit of Loving (collection) (1957)
    • Wine (short story) (1957)
  • Fourteen Poems (1959)
  • In Pursuit of the English (nonfiction) (1960)
  • The Golden Notebook (1962)
  • Play with a Tiger (play) (1962)
  • A Man and Two Women (collection) (1963)
  • African Stories (collection) (1964)
  • Cat Tales:
    • Particularly Cats (stories & nonfiction) (1967)
    • Particularly Cats and Rufus the Survivor (1993)
    • The Old Age of El Magnifico (stories & nonfiction) (2000)
  • Briefing for a Descent into Hell (1971)
  • The Temptation of Jack Orkney and other Stories (collection) (1972)
  • The Summer Before the Dark (1973)
  • A Small Personal Voice (Essays) (1974)
  • Memoirs of a Survivor (1974)
  • Stories (collection) (1978)
  • To Room Nineteen (1978)
  • The Canopus in Argos: Archives Series (1979-1983):
  • Under the pseudonym Jane Somers:
    • The Diary of a Good Neighbour (1983)
    • If the Old Could... (1984)
  • The Good Terrorist (1985)
  • Prisons We Choose to Live Inside (essays, 1987)
  • The Wind Blows Away Our Words (1987)
  • The Fifth Child (1988)
  • African Laughter: Four Visits to Zimbabwe (memoir) (1992)
  • London Observed: Stories and Sketches (collection) (1993)
  • Conversations (interviews, edited by Earl G. Ingersoll) (1994)
  • Lessing's autobiography:
    • Under My Skin: Volume One of My Autobiography, to 1949 (1994)
    • Walking in the Shade: Volume Two of My Autobiography 1949 to 1962 (1997)
  • Spies I Have Known (collection) (1995)
  • Playing the Game (graphic novel, illustrated by Charlie Adlard) (1995)
  • Love, Again (1996)
  • The Pit (collection) (1996)
  • Mara and Dann (1999)
  • Ben, in the World (a sequel to The Fifth Child) ISBN 0-06-093465-4 (2000)
  • The Sweetest Dream ISBN 0-06-093755-6 (2001)
  • The Grandmothers : Four Short Novels ISBN 0-06-053010-3 (2003)
  • The Story of General Dann and Mara's Daughter, Griot and the Snow Dog (a sequel to Mara and Dann) (2005)
  • The Cleft (2007)
  • Alfred and Emily (2008)

The Grass is Singing is the first novel, published in 1950, by British Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing. ... The Four-Gated City is a novel, published in 1969,[1] by British Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing. ... The Golden Notebook is a 1962 novel by British author Doris Lessing. ... Memoirs of a survivor is a novel by Doris Lessing. ... Canopus in Argos is a series of science fiction novels written by Doris Lessing. ... Shikasta is the title of a science fiction novel by author Doris Lessing and also the name of a fictional planet in this book. ... The Marriages Between Zones Three, Four and Five (1981) is one of a set of unconventional science fiction novels written by Nobel Prize-winner Doris Lessing. ... One of a set of unconventional SF novels written by Doris Lessing. ... The Making of the Representative for Planet 8 (ISBN 0586056548) is one of a set of unconventional SF novels written by Nobel Prize-winner Doris Lessing. ... The Sentimental Agents in the Volyen Empire is one of a set of unconventional SF novels written by Doris Lessing. ... The novel The Fifth Child by Doris Lessing was first published in Britain in 1988 and has since been translated into a number of languages. ...

References

  1. ^ Doris Lessing. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  2. ^ a b c d Biography. A Reader's Guide to The Golden Notebook & Under My Skin. HarperCollins (1995). Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  3. ^ NobelPrize.org. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  4. ^ Crown, Sarah. Look at her face.Doris Lessing wins Nobel prize. Look at her face.. The Guardian. Retrieved 2007-10-12.
  5. ^ Editors at BBC. Author Lessing wins Nobel honour. BBC News. Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  6. ^ Marchand, Philip. Doris Lessing oldest to win literature award. Toronto Star. Retrieved on 2007-10-13.
  7. ^ Hazelton, Lesley. "`Golden Notebook' Author Lessing Wins Nobel Prize", Bloomberg, 2007-10-11. Retrieved on 2007-10-11. 
  8. ^ Klein, Carole. Doris Lessing. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  9. ^ a b c d Doris Lessing. kirjasto.sci.fi. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  10. ^ a b Hazelton, Lesley. "Doris Lessing on Feminism, Communism and 'Space Fiction'", The New York Times, 1982-07-25. Retrieved on 2007-10-11. 
  11. ^ a b "Author Lessing wins Nobel honour", BBC News Online, 2007-10-11. Retrieved on 2007-10-11. 
  12. ^ Carol Simpson Stern. Doris Lessing Biography. biography.jrank.org. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  13. ^ Billinghurst, Kevin. "British Author Doris Lessing Wins Nobel Prize for Literature", Voices of America, 2007-10-11. Retrieved on 2007-10-15. 
  14. ^ Hanft, Adam. When Doris Lessing Became Jane Somers and Tricked the Publishing World (And Possibly Herself In the Process). Huffington Post. Retrieved on 2007-10-11. The Diary of a Good Neighbour[1] was published in England and the US in 1983, and If the Old Could in both countries in 1984[2], both as written by "Jane Somers." In 1984, both novels were re-published in both countries (Viking Books publishing in the US), this time under one cover, with the title The Diaries of Jane Somers: The Diary of a Good Neighbor and If the Old Could, listing Doris Lessing as author.
  15. ^ Doris Lessing interview (Audio). BBC Radio. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  16. ^ Companions of Literature list. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  17. ^ Rich, Motoko and Lyall, Sarah. Doris Lessing Wins Nobel Prize in Literature. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  18. ^ Wilkes, David. British author, 87, wins Nobel while out shopping. Daily Mail. Retrieved on 2007-10-16.
  19. ^ Lessing is the third oldest person to be awarded a Nobel Prize. Leonid Hurwicz was 90 when he was awarded the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science in 2007. Raymond Davis Jr., also 87 when he won the 2002 Physics Prize, is 5 days older than Lessing.
  20. ^ Pierre-Henry Deshayes. Doris Lessing wins Nobel Literature Prize. Herald Sun. Retrieved on 2007-10-16.
  21. ^ Reynolds, Nigel. Doris Lessing wins Nobel prize for literature. The Telegraph. Retrieved on 2007-10-15.
  22. ^ Hinckley, David. Doris Lessing wins Nobel Prize for Literature. New York Daily News. Retrieved on 2007-10-15.
  23. ^ "Lessing: Nobel win a 'disaster'", BBC News Online, 11 May 2008. Retrieved on 2008-05-11. 
  24. ^ Doris Lessing: Hot Dawns, interview by Harvey Blume in Boston Book Review
  25. ^ "Guest of Honor Speech", in Worldcon Guest of Honor Speeches, edited by Mike Resnick and Joe Siclari (Deerfield, IL: ISFIC Press, 2006), p. 192.
  26. ^ Lessing's Early and Transitional Novels: The Beginnings of a Sense of Selfhood Retrieved 2007-10-17
  27. ^ Harry Ransom Center Holds Archive of Nobel Laureate Doris Lessing. hrc.utexas.edu. Retrieved on 2008-03-17.
  28. ^ Doris Lessing manuscripts. www.lib.utulsa.edu. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leonid Leo Hurwicz (born August 21, 1917, Moscow, Russia) is Regents’ Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Minnesota. ... Raymond Davis Jr. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Persondata
NAME Lessing, Doris
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Tayler, Doris May
SHORT DESCRIPTION British writer
DATE OF BIRTH 22 October 1919
PLACE OF BIRTH Kermanshah, Persia (Iran)
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Doris Lessing - Wikipedia, den fria encyklopedin (1579 words)
Doris Lessing har fått ett flertal erkännanden för sitt författarskap, som inbegriper såväl skönlitteratur som faktaböcker, och i samtliga fall innehåller ett stort mått av självbiografiskt innehåll.
Lessings prosa brukar delas in i tre skilda faser: Kommunisttemat 1944-1956, när hon skrev radikalt om sociala frågor, Det psykologiska temat 1956-1969 och därefter det sufiska temat, som kom att etablera Lessing som en mystikförfattare av rang.
Lessing har också skrivit ett antal böcker om katter, som är hennes favoritdjur.
Joyce Carol Oates - A Visit with Doris Lessing (2399 words)
Lessing whether she felt it was extremely difficult to convey the sense of a "mystical" experience in the framework of fiction, of any kind of work intended to communicate naturalistically to a large audience.
Lessing was understandably reticent about her own writing—and perhaps I embarrassed her by my own enthusiasm, though I did not tell her that she was quite mistaken in her feeling that her writing might not have the effect she desired: The Golden Notebook alone has radically changed the consciousness of many young women.
Lessing cannot return to the country of her childhood and girlhood, Southern Rhodesia, because she is a "prohibited immigrant"; homesick for the veldt, she had her daughter send her several color photographs of African flowers, which are on display in her flat).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m