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Encyclopedia > Doonesbury
Doonesbury
Creator(s) Garry Trudeau
Status Running
Syndicate(s) Universal Press Syndicate
Genre(s) Humor, Politics, Satire
First strip October 26, 1970

Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. It chronicles the adventures and lives of a vast array of different characters, of different ages, professions, and backgrounds- from the President of the United States to the title character, Michael Doonesbury, a struggling middle aged single father. Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ... Universal Press Syndicate, an Andrews McMeel Universal company, provides syndication for a number of lifestyle and opinion columns, comics, and various other content. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ... The presidential seal was first used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Middle age consists of the ages around, or older than, the middle of the average lifespan of human beings. ...


Frequently political in nature, Doonesbury features characters professing a range of affiliations, but the cartoon's editorial slant is primarily noted for a liberal outlook. The name "Doonesbury" is a combination of the word doone — 1960s prep school slang for "someone unafraid to appear foolish" — with the surname of the roommate who was given that nickname, Charles Pillsbury. The strip marked its official thirty-fifth anniversary on October 26, 2005. Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... A family name, surname, or last name is the part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... // A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things real name (for example, Bob, Rob, Robby, Robbie, Robi, Robin, Bobby, Rab, Rabbie, Bert, Bertie, Butch, Bobbers, Bobert, Beto, Bobadito, and Robban (in Sweden), are all nicknames for Robert). ... Charlie Pillsbury is a mediator, lawyer, and community activist in New Haven, Connecticut, where he is the executive director of Community Mediation, Inc. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

Doonesbury began as a continuation of Bull Tales, which appeared in the Yale University student newspaper, the Yale Daily News, beginning September 1968. It focused on local campus events at Yale. The executive editor of the paper in the late 1960s, Reed Hundt, who later served as the chairman of the FCC, noted that the Daily News had a flexible policy about publishing cartoons: "We publish[ed] pretty much anything." Yale redirects here. ... A front page of the Yale Daily News. ... Editor has four major senses: Print media There are various levels of editorial positions in publishing. ... Reed Hundt was chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... The FCCs official seal. ...

The first Doonesbury cartoon, from 26 October 1970.
The first Doonesbury cartoon, from 26 October 1970.

As Doonesbury, the strip debuted as a daily strip in about two dozen newspapers on October 26, 1970, the first strip from Universal Press Syndicate. A Sunday strip began on March 21, 1971. Many of the early strips were reprintings of the Bull Tales cartoons, with some changes to the drawings and plots. B.D.'s helmet changed from having a "Y" (for Yale) to a star (for the fictional Walden College). Mike and B.D. started Doonesbury as roommates; they were not roommates in the original. Image File history File links Db701026. ... Image File history File links Db701026. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... See also Comic strip and Sunday strip. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... Universal Press Syndicate, an Andrews McMeel Universal company, provides syndication for a number of lifestyle and opinion columns, comics, and various other content. ... See also Comic strip and Daily strip. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ...


It became well known for its social and political (usually liberal) commentary, always timely, and peppered with wry and ironic humor. It is presently syndicated in approximately 1,400 newspapers worldwide. The decision, on September 12, 2005 to drop Doonesbury from The Guardian (UK) was reversed less than 24 hours later, after the strip's followers voiced strong discontent. American liberalism—that is, liberalism in the United States of America—is a broad political and philosophical mindset, favoring individual liberty, and opposing restrictions on liberty, whether they come from established religion, from government regulation, from the existing class structure, or from multi-national corporations. ... Irony, from the Greek εἴρων (iron), is a literary or rhetorical device made of iron, in which there is a gap or incongruity between what a speaker or a writer says, and what is generally understood (either at the time, or in the later context of history). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...


Like Li'l Abner and Pogo before it, Doonesbury blurred the distinction between editorial cartoon and the funny pages. In May 1975, the strip won Trudeau a Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning, the first strip cartoon to be so honored. That month, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, the publishers of collections of Doonesbury until the mid-1980s took out an ad in the New York Times Book Review, marking the occasion by saying: It's nice for Trudeau and Doonesbury to be so honored, "but it's quite another thing when the Establishment clutches all of Walden Commune to its bosom." That same year, then-U.S. President Gerald Ford acknowledged the stature of the comic strip, telling the Radio and Television Correspondents' Association at their annual dinner: "There are only three major vehicles to keep us informed as to what is going on in Washington: the electronic media, the print media, and Doonesbury — not necessarily in that order." [1] Lil Abner was a comic strip in United States newspapers, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the town of Dogpatch. ... Pogo as drawn by Walt Kelly. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning has been awarded since 1922 for a distinguished cartoon or portfolio of cartoons published during the year, characterized by originality, editorial effectiveness, quality of drawing, and pictorial effect. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... The Radio and Television Correspondents Association is an American journalism group best known for holding an annual dinner in Washington, D.C. every year beginning in 1945. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D...

The famous Doonesbury "Stonewall" strip, referring to the Watergate scandal, from 12 August 1974; awarded the Pulitzer Prize.
The famous Doonesbury "Stonewall" strip, referring to the Watergate scandal, from 12 August 1974; awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

In 1977, Trudeau wrote a script for a twenty-six minute long animated "special." A Doonesbury Special was produced and directed by Trudeau, along with John Hubley and Faith Hubley. The Special was first broadcast by NBC in 1977. It won a Special Jury Award at the Cannes International Film Festival for best short film, and received an Academy Award Nomination (for best animated short film), both in 1978. Voice actors for the special included Barbara Harris, William Sloane Coffin, Jr., Jack Gilford and Will Jordan. Two songs "sung" by the character of Jimmy Thudpucker (titled "Stop in the Middle" and "I Do Believe", the performances were credited to "Jimmy Thudpucker") were also made part of the Special. Image File history File links Stonewalldb. ... Image File history File links Stonewalldb. ... The term Watergate scandal refers to a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. by members of the Richard Nixon administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... John Hubley (May 21, 1914 – February 21, 1977) was an animator and animation director known for both his formal experimentation and for his emotional realism which stemmed from his tendency to cast his own children as voice actors in his films. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... NBC (an abbreviation for National Broadcasting Company, its former corporate name) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Barbara Harris (born July 25, 1935) is the American Tony Award-winning Broadway stage star and Academy Award-nominated motion picture actress. ... Rev. ... Jack Gilford Jack Gilford (July 25, 1908 – June 2, 1990) was an American actor with a long and successful career on the Broadway stage, films and television. ... Will Jordan (born July 27, 1927) is an American character actor who is best known for his uncanny resemblance to long-time TV host Ed Sullivan, coupled with his ability to present a dead-on impression of the mans unique nasal voice and self-conscious, quirky mannerisms. ...


The strip underwent a significant change after Trudeau returned to it from a 22 month hiatus (from January 1983 to October 1984), during which he helped create a Broadway musical of the same title. Before the break in the strip, the characters were eternal college students, living in a commune together near "Walden College," which was modelled after Trudeau's alma mater. Doonesbury is a musical with a book and lyrics by Garry Trudeau and music by Elizabeth Swados. ...


The Broadway adaptation opened at the Biltmore Theatre on November 21, 1983, and played 104 performances. Elizabeth Swados composed the music for Trudeau's book and lyrics. The Biltmore Theater is a Broadway theatre. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... American musician, director, and composer, she has received five Tony award nominations and three Obie awards for her theatrical productions both on and off Broadway. ...


After the hiatus

The strip resumed some time after the events in the musical, with further changes having taken place after the end of the musical's plot. While Mike, Mark, Zonker, B.D. and Boopsie were all now graduates, B.D. and Boopsie were living in Malibu, where B.D. was a third-string quarterback for the Los Angeles Rams, and Boopsie was making a living from walk-on and cameo roles. Mark was living in Washington D.C., working for National Public Radio. Michael and J.J. had gotten married, and Mike had dropped out of business school to start work in an advertising agency in New York City. Zonker, still not ready for the "real world," was living with Mike and J.J. until he was accepted as a medical student at his Uncle Duke's "Baby Doc College" in Haiti. Offical NPR logo National Public Radio (NPR) is an independent, private, non-profit membership organization of public radio stations in the United States. ...


Prior to the hiatus, the strip's characters had aged at the tectonically slow rate that is standard for comic strips. But when Trudeau returned to "Doonesbury," the characters began to age in something close to real time, as in "Gasoline Alley" and "For Better or For Worse." Since then, the main characters' age and career development has tracked that of standard media portrayals of baby boomers, with jobs in advertising, law enforcement, and the dot-com boom. Current events are mirrored through the original characters, their offspring (the "second generation"), and occasional new characters. Gasoline Alley is a comic strip created by Frank King that was first published on 24 November 1918. ... For Better or For Worse (FBorFW) is a comic strip by Lynn Johnston that began in September 1979. ... The dot-com bubble was a speculative bubble covering roughly 1997–2001 during which stock markets in Western nations saw their value increase rapidly from growth in the new Internet sector and related fields. ...


Post-hiatus, Trudeau developed a more sophisticated look for the strip, often varying his angles from frame to frame. The result was more graphically dynamic, without sacrificing the deadpan quality that made the punchlines land.


Garry Trudeau received the National Cartoonist Society Newspaper Comic Strip Award for 1994, and their Reuben Award for 1995 for his work on the strip. The National Cartoonists Society is an organization of professional cartoonists created in 1946. ... The Reuben Awards, named for Rube Goldberg, are presented each year by the National Cartoonists Society. ...

The Doonesbury strip from 28 November 2005, reuniting the characters of Michael Doonesbury and B.D.
The Doonesbury strip from 28 November 2005, reuniting the characters of Michael Doonesbury and B.D.

Image File history File links Db051128. ... Image File history File links Db051128. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Characteristic style

The unnamed college attended by the main characters was later given the name "Walden College", revealed to be in Connecticut (the same state as Yale), and depicted as devolving into a third-rate institution under the weight of grade inflation, slipping academic standards, and the end of tenure—issues that Trudeau has consistently revisited since the original characters graduated. Many of the second generation of Doonesbury characters are attending Walden, a venue Trudeau uses to advance his concerns about academic standards in America. Grade inflation is an issue in U.S. education and in GCSEs in England and Wales. ... Look up tenure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


With the exception of Walden College, Trudeau has frequently used real-life settings, based on real scenarios, but with fictional results. Due to deadlines, some real-world events have rendered some of Trudeau's comics unusable, such as a 1989 series set in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China, a 1993 series involving Zoë Baird, and a 2005 series involving Harriet Miers. Trudeau has also delighted and intrigued readers by displaying fluency in various forms of jargon, including that of real estate agents, flight attendants, computer nerds, journalists, presidential aides, and soldiers in Iraq. Tiananmen Square (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Tiānānmén GuÇŽngchÇŽng) is the large plaza near the center of Beijing, China, named after the Tiananmen (literally, Gate of Heavenly Peace) which sits to its north, separating it from the Forbidden City. ... Beijing [English Pronunciation] (Chinese: 北京 [Chinese Pronunciation]; Pinyin: BÄ›ijÄ«ng; IPA: ), a metropolis in northern China, is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Zoë Eliot Baird (born 1952) is a U.S. lawyer. ... Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945 in Dallas, Texas) is an American lawyer, and former White House Counsel. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Flight attendant in an Embraer ERJ 145 LR (PBair, Thailand) Stewardess, circa 1949-50, American Overseas, Flagship Denmark, Boeing Stratocruiser In aviation, flight attendants—formerly known as sky girls, air hostesses, stewardesses or stewards—are members of a flight crew employed by airlines to ensure the the safety of the... “Nerds” redirects here. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Use of real-life politicians as characters

Main article: Doonesbury Icons

Even though Doonesbury frequently features major real-life US politicians, they are rarely depicted with their real face. Originally, strips featuring the President of the US would show an external view of the White House, with dialogue emerging from inside. During the Ford administration, characters would be shown speaking to Ford at press conferences, and fictional dialogue supposedly spoken by Ford would be written as coming "off-panel". Similarly, while having several characters as students in a class taught by Henry Kissinger, the dialogue made up for Kissinger would also come from "off-panel". Sometimes hands, or in rare cases, the back of heads would also be seen. In the comic strip Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau, famous politicians are generally represented not as themselves, but as Icons that represent some aspect of their personalities. ... North façade of the White House, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue. ...


More recently, personal symbols reflecting some aspect of their character are used. For example, members of the Bush family have been depicted as invisible. During his term as Vice President George H. W. Bush was first depicted as completely invisible, his words emanating from a little "spark" in the air. This was originally a reference to the man's perceived low profile and his denials of knowledge of the Iran-Contra Affair. (In one strip, published March 20, 1988, the vice president almost materialized, but only made it to an outline before reverting to invisibility.) President George W. Bush was later symbolized by a Stetson hat atop a giant asterisk (a la Roger Maris), because he was Governor of Texas prior to his presidency (Trudeau accused him of being "all hat and no cattle.") and also due to the controversy surrounding the 2000 presidential elections. Later, President Bush's symbol was changed to a Roman military helmet (again, atop an asterisk) representing imperialism. Towards the end of his first term, the helmet became battered, with the giltwork starting to come off and with clumps of bristles missing from the top. (By now, the helmet has been dented almost beyond recognition.) On September 2, 2006, he fantasized about himself wearing a crown. The Bush family:President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush, former First Lady Barbara Bush, and former President George H. W. Bush sit surrounded by family in the Red Room (White House) on January 6, 2005, together to celebrate the senior couples 60th wedding anniversary. ... The Iran-Contra Affair was the largest political scandal in the United States during the 1980s, considered by some to be one of the largest political scandals in history. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Stetson Cavalry Hat For the university, see Stetson University. ... This article refers to the typographical symbol. ... Roger Maris signs a baseball for President John F. Kennedy Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths 34-year-old single-season home run record in 1961 on the last... Official language(s) English (de facto) See also languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Other notable symbols include a waffle for the indecisive Bill Clinton (chosen by popular vote – the other possibility had been a "flipping coin"), an unexploded (but sometimes lit) bomb for the hot-tempered Newt Gingrich, a feather for the "lightweight" Dan Quayle and a giant groping hand for Arnold Schwarzenegger (who is addressed by other characters as "Herr Gropenführer", a reference to accusations of sexual assault against Schwarzenegger). Many minor politicians have also been represented as icons over the years, but only for the purposes of a gag strip or two. Trudeau has made his use of icons something of an in joke to readers, where the first appearance of a new one is often a punchline in itself. British usage of the term waffle denotes language without meaning; blathering, babbling, droning. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989-1993). ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation (IPA): ) (born on July 30, 1947, in Graz, Austria) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, actor and an American politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... An in-joke or inside joke is a joke whose humor is clear only to those people who are in a group that has some prior knowledge (not known by the whole population) that makes the joke humorous. ... For the phase, see Punch line Punchline is a North American punk rock band from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ...


The long career of the series and continual use of real-life political figures, analysts note, have led to some uncanny cases of the cartoon foreshadowing a national shift in the politicians' political fortunes. Tina Gianoulis in St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture observes: "In 1971, well before the conservative Reagan years, a forward-looking B.D. called Ronald Reagan his 'hero.' In 1984, almost 10 years before Congressman Gingrich became Speaker of the House, another character worried that he would 'wake up someday in a country run by Newt Gingrich.'"[2] In its 2003 series "John Kerry: A Candidate in the Making" on the 2004 presidential race, the Boston Globe reprinted and discussed 1971 Doonesbury cartoons of the young Kerry's Vietnam War protest speeches.[3] Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ...


Characters

Doonesbury has a large group of recurring characters, with 24 of them currently listed on the cast list at the strip's website.[4] There, it notes that "readers new to Doonesbury sometimes experience a temporary bout of character shock," as the sheer number of characters—and the historical connections among them—can be overwhelming. This is a list of characters in the comic strip Doonesbury, by Garry Trudeau. ...


The main characters of the strip are a group who attended the fictional Walden College during the strip's first twelve years. In April 1972, a sub-group of these characters started their own commune, and moved in together. The original "Walden Commune" residents were: Mike Doonesbury, Zonker Harris, Mark Slackmeyer, Nicole, Bernie and DiDi. Zonker was soon given "Walden Puddle" to reflect in, and the residents of Walden Commune changed over time. In September 1972, Joanie Caucus joined the comic, meeting Mike and Mark in Colorado, and eventually moved into the commune. They were later joined by B.D. and his girlfriend (later wife) Boopsie. Nicole, DiDi and Bernie were phased out both as characters, and as residents of the commune. The spouses of this group became important following this group's graduation; they are J.J. Caucus (Mike's now-ex-wife) and Rick Redfern (Joanie's husband). Mike remarried, to Kim Rosenthal, a Vietnamese refugee who had been adopted by a Jewish-American family just after the fall of Saigon and whose first words as an infant in the strip had been "Big Mac." Uncle Duke and Roland Hedley have also appeared often, frequently in unconnected, more topical settings. In more recent years, a second generation of characters has taken prominence as it has grown up to college-age; this group consists of Jeff Redfern (Joanie's son), Zipper Harris (Zonker's nephew), and Alex Doonesbury (Mike and J.J.'s daughter). Mike Doonesbury is the main character in Garry Trudeaus comic strip Doonesbury. ... Zonker Harris (his full name is revealed in Doonesbury: A Musical Comedy to be Edgar Zonker Harris) is the stereotypical hippie character in Garry Trudeaus comic strip Doonesbury. ... Mark Slackmeyer is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ... Joanie Caucus is a character in Garry Trudeaus comics strip Doonesbury. ... B.D. is a character fron Garry Trudeaus popular comic strip Doonesbury. ... Boopsie (aka Barbara Ann Boopstein) is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ... J.J. is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ... Rick Redfern is a character in the comics strip Doonesbury. ... Uncle Duke is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ... Roland Hedley Roland Hedley is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury, inspired by the on-air style of the veteran US reporter Sam Donaldson. ... Jeff Redfern is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ... Zipper Harris is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ... Alex Doonesbury is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ...


Milestones

Doonesbury delved into a number of political and social issues, causing controversies, and breaking new ground on the comics pages. Among the milestones:

  • A November 1972 strip depicting Zonker telling a little boy in a sandbox a fairy tale ending in the protagonist being awarded "his weight in fine, uncut Turkish hashish" raised an uproar.[5]
  • During the Watergate scandal, one strip showed Mark on the radio with a "Watergate profile" of John Mitchell, declaring him "Guilty! Guilty, guilty, guilty!!" A number of newspapers removed the strip and one, the Washington Post even ran an editorial criticizing the cartoon.[6]
  • In June 1973, the military newspaper Stars and Stripes dropped Doonesbury for being too political. The strip was quickly reinstated after hundreds of protests by readers, who were soldiers in the U.S. Army.
  • September 1973: the Lincoln Journal became the first newspaper to move Doonesbury to its editorial page.[7]
  • In February 1976, Andy Lippincott, a classmate of Joanie's, told her that he was gay. Dozens of papers opted not to publish the storyline, with Miami Herald editor Larry Jinks saying, "We just decided we weren't ready for homosexuality in a comic strip."[8]
  • In November 1976, when the storyline included the blossoming romance of Rick Redfern and Joanie Caucus, four days of strips were devoted to a transition from one apartment to another, ending with a view of the two together in bed, marking the first time any nationally run comic strip portrayed premarital sex in this fashion.[8] Again, the strip was removed from the comics pages of a number of newspapers.
  • In June 1978, one strip included a coupon listing various politicians and dollar amounts allegedly taken from Korean lobbyists, to be clipped and glued to a postcard to be sent to the Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill, resulting in an overflow of mail to the Speaker's office.
  • In August 1979, Trudeau took a three-week vacation from the strip, which was uncommon among comic strip writers and artists.
  • From January 1983 through September 1984, the strip was not published so that Trudeau could bring the strip to Broadway.
  • In June 1985, a series of strips included photos of Frank Sinatra associating with a number of people with mafia connections, one alongside text from President Ronald Reagan's speech awarding Sinatra the Medal of Freedom.
  • In January 1987, politicians were again declared "Guilty, guilty, guilty." This time it was Donald Regan, John Poindexter and Oliver North, referring to their roles in the Iran-Contra Affair.
  • In June 1989, several days' comics (which had already been drawn and written) had to be replaced with repeats, due to the humor of the strips being considered in bad taste in light of the mass murder of democracy demonstrators in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, People's Republic of China. Trudeau himself asked for the recall.[9] This was despite an interview published with Universal Press Syndicate's Editorial Director, Lee Salem, in the 28 May 1989 San Jose Mercury News in which Salem stated his hopes the strips could still be used.
  • In May 1990, the storyline included the death of Andy Lippincott, who succumbed to AIDS.
  • In November 1991, a series of strips implied that former Vice-President Dan Quayle had connections with drug dealers; the strip sequence was dropped by some two dozen newspapers, in part because the allegations had been investigated and dispelled previously.[10](Six years later, the reporter who broke the Quayle story some weeks after the Doonesbury cartoons later published a book saying he no longer believed the story had been true.[11])
  • In December 1992, Working Woman magazine named two characters (Joanie Caucus and Lacey Davenport) as role models for women.
  • In November 1993, a story line dealing with California wildfires was dropped from several California newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times, the Orange County Register and the San Diego Union-Tribune.[12]
  • In June 1994, the Roman Catholic Church took issue with a series of strips dealing with the book Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe by John Boswell. A few newspapers dropped single strips from the series, and the Pantagraph from Bloomington, Illinois, refused to run the entire series.
  • In March 1995, John McCain denounced Trudeau on the floor of the Senate: "Suffice it to say that I hold Trudeau in utter contempt." This was in response to a strip about Bob Dole's strategy of exploiting his war record in his presidential campaign. The quotation was used on the cover of Trudeau's book Doonesbury Nation. (McCain and Trudeau later made peace: McCain wrote the foreword to The Long Road Home, Trudeau's collection of comic strips dealing with B.D.'s leg amputation during the second Iraq war.)
  • Later in 1995 Mark Slackmeyer, a gay character from the strip, was seen in the final days of Berkeley Breathed's comic Outland heading off with a main character from that series, Steve Dallas.
  • In February 1998, a strip dealing with Bill Clinton's sex scandal was removed from the comics pages of a number of newspapers because it included the phrases "oral sex" and "semen-streaked dress".
  • In November 2000, a strip was not run in some newspapers when Duke says of then-Presidential candidate George W. Bush: "He's got a history of alcohol abuse and cocaine."
  • In September 2001, a strip perpetuated the Internet hoax that claimed George W. Bush had the lowest IQ of any president in the last 50 years, half that of Bill Clinton.[13] When caught repeating the hoax, Trudeau apologized for "unsettling anyone who was under the impression that the President is, in fact, quite intelligent."[14]
  • In 2003 a cartoon that publicized the recent medical discovery that masturbation reduces the risk of prostate cancer, with one character alluding to the practice as "self-dating", was not run in many papers; pre-publication sources indicated that as many as half of the 700 papers to which it was syndicated were planning not to run the strip.[15]
  • February 2004: Trudeau used his strip to make the apparently genuine offer of $10,000 (to the USO in the winner's name[16]) for anyone who can personally confirm that George W. Bush was actually present during a part of his service in the National Guard. Reuters and CNN reported by the end of that week that despite 1,300 responses, no credible evidence had been offered[17]; as of 2006, the offer remains unclaimed.
  • April 2004: On April 21, after nearly 34 years, readers finally saw B.D.'s head without some sort of helmet. In the same strip, it was revealed that he had lost a leg in the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq. Later that month, after awakening and discovering his situation, B.D. exclaims "SON OF A BITCH!!!" The single strip was removed from many papers — including the Boston Globe[18] — although in others, such as Newsday, the offending word was replaced by a line. The Dallas Morning News ran the cartoon uncensored, with a footnote that the editor believed profanity was appropriate, given the subject matter. An image of B.D. with amputated leg also appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone that summer (issue 954).
  • May 2004: two Sunday strips were published containing only the names of soldiers killed in the War in Iraq. Further such lists were printed in May 2005 and May/June 2006.
  • On 7 March 2005, the series began a sequence memorializing the death by suicide of Hunter S. Thompson, the inspiration for the character of Duke. In the sequence, Duke's head explodes upon reading the news; in an unusual development, no newspapers are known to have refused to print that day's strip. Trudeau indicated in a news story that one reason for this willingness may have been that the character had a history of similar events: "I've been exploding Duke's head as far back as 1985," he said.[19]
  • In June 2005, Trudeau came out with "The Long Road Home," a book devoted to BD's recovery from his loss of a leg in Iraq. Although Trudeau opposed the Iraq War, the foreword was written by Sen.John McCain, a supporter of the war. Proceeds from the book, and its sequel "The War Within", benefit Fisher House, the generic name for homes where families of injured soldiers may stay near where they are recovering, also known as "the military equivalent of Ronald McDonald House." [20]
  • July 2005: Several newspapers declined to run two strips in which George W. Bush refers to his adviser Karl Rove as "Turd Blossom," a nickname Bush has been reported to use for Rove.[21]
  • In September 2005 when the British newspaper The Guardian relaunched in a smaller format, Doonesbury was dropped due to space considerations. After a flood of complaints the strip was reinstated with an omnibus covering the issues missed and a full apology. [22]
  • The strips scheduled to run from 31 October to 5 November 2005 and a Sunday strip scheduled for 13 November about the nomination of Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court were withdrawn suddenly after her nomination was. The strips have been posted on the official website [23], and were replaced by re-runs by the syndicate.
  • Trudeau sought input from readers as to where Alex Doonesbury should attend college in a 15 May 2006 straw cyber-poll at Doonesbury.com. Voters chose among MIT, Rensselaer, and Cornell. Students from Rensselaer and then MIT hacked the system, which was designed to limit each computer to one vote. In the end, voters logged 175,000 votes, with MIT grabbing 48% of the total. The Doonesbury Town Hall FAQ stated that given that the rules of the poll had not ruled out such methods, "the will, chutzpah, and bodacious craft of the voting public will be respected," declaring that Alex will be attending MIT.

A protagonist is the central figure of a story. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The term Watergate scandal refers to a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. by members of the Richard Nixon administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ... Mitchell (far left) meeting with Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover, and John Ehrlichman on May 26, 1971. ... ... Stars and Stripes is the name of the United States Armed Forces newspaper that is published for American forces. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The Lincoln Journal Star is Lincoln, Nebraskas major daily newspaper. ... The Miami Herald is a daily newspaper owned by Knight Ridder. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Lobbying is the practice of private advocacy with the goal of influencing a governing body, in order to ensure that an individuals or organizations point of view is represented in the government. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... Thomas Phillip ONeill, Jr. ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and Academy Award-winning actor, often cited as the finest male American popular song vocalist of the 20th century. ... :For other meanings, see Mafia (disambiguation) The Sicilian Mafia (also referred to simply as the Mafia or Cosa Nostra), is a criminal secret society which first developed in the mid-19th century in Sicily. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom is the highest civilian award in the United States. ... Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918 – June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Reagan administration, where he advocated supply-side economics and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate production. ... Rear Admiral John Poindexter (Ret. ... Lt-Col. ... The Iran-Contra Affair was the largest political scandal in the United States during the 1980s, considered by some to be one of the largest political scandals in history. ... The Unknown Rebel - This famous photo was taken on 5 June 1989 by photographer Jeff Widener, depicts a lone protester whose tried to stop four advancing tanks until he was pulled into the crowd by a few other onlookers. ... Beijing [English Pronunciation] (Chinese: 北京 [Chinese Pronunciation]; Pinyin: BÄ›ijÄ«ng; IPA: ), a metropolis in northern China, is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Mercs sections vary by day of the week, but Business, Sports, and The Valley are standard daily fare. ... This article is about the syndrome. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989-1993). ... The Los Angeles Times (also known as the LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... The Orange County Register is a daily newspaper published in Santa Ana, California. ... The San Diego Union-Tribune is a daily newspaper published in San Diego, California by the Copley Press. ... Professor John Boswell John Eastburn Boswell (March 20, 1947 - December 24, 1994), was a prominent historian and a professor at Yale University. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Robert Joseph Bob Dole (born July 22, 1923) was the Republican candidate in the 1996 U.S. Presidential election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Mark Slackmeyer is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ... Guy Berkeley (Berke) Breathed (born June 21, 1957) is an American cartoonist, childrens book author/illustrator, director, and screenwriter, best known for Bloom County, a 1980s cartoon-comic strip which dealt with socio-political issues as seen through the eyes of highly exaggerated characters (e. ... Outland was a Sunday-only spin-off of Bloom County by Berkeley Breathed. ... Steve Dallas was a fictional unscrupulous lawyer in the 1980s comic strip Bloom County, by Berke Breathed. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Monica Lewinsky on her U.S. Government ID Monica Samille Lewinsky (born July 23, 1973 in San Francisco) is an American woman who is believed to have had an affair with President of the United States Bill Clinton while she worked at the White House in 1995-1996. ... Oral sex consists of all sexual activities that involve the use of the mouth, tongue, and possibly the throat, to stimulate genitalia. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Cocaine (or crack in its impure freebase form) is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Mulher sentada de coxas abertas, 1916 drawing by Gustav Klimt Masturbation refers to sexual stimulation, particularly of ones own genitals and often to the point of orgasm, which is performed manually, by other types of bodily contact (except for sexual intercourse), by use of objects or tools, or by... Prostate cancer is a disease in which cancer develops in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. ... USO is a TLA that may stand for: Unidentified submarine object Udaipur Solar Observatory Ultra stable oscillator Unidentified submarine object or Unidentified swimming object or Unidentified submersible object Union der Schülerorganisationen (uso. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... The Dallas Morning News is the major daily newspaper serving the Dallas, Texas area. ... This article is about the magazine. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... Parker Anderson-Stanley, four, visits with Olympic gold-medalist Cassie Campbell at Ronald McDonald House Southern Alberta in Calgary on Saturday, 2006-01-14. ... Karl Rove Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush. ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: nn notable neologism If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945 in Dallas, Texas) is an American lawyer, and former White House Counsel. ... (Redirected from 15 May) May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or RPI, is a coeducational private university in Troy, New York, near Albany, founded in 1824 by Stephen Van Rensselaer. ... Cornell redirects here. ...

Criticism

Some conservatives have intensely criticized Doonesbury. Several examples are cited in the Milestones section. The strip has also met criticism from its readers almost since it began syndicated publication. In another example, when Lacey Davenport's husband Dick, in the last moments before his death, calls on God, several conservative pundits, apparently not understanding the context, called the strip blasphemous. The sequence of Dick Davenport's final bird-watching and fatal heart attack was run in November 1986. Conservatism is a political philosophy that usually favors traditional values and strong foreign defense. ...


Doonesbury has angered, irritated, or been rebuked by many of the political figures that have appeared or been referred to in the strip over the years. Outspoken critics have included members of every US Presidential administration since Richard Nixon's. A 1984 series of strips showing then Vice President George H.W. Bush placing his manhood in a blind trust — in parody of Bush's using that financial instrument to fend off concerns that his governmental decisions would be influenced by his investment holdings — brought the politician to complain, "Doonesbury’s carrying water for the opposition. Trudeau is coming out of deep left field."[24] There have also been other politicians who did not view the way that Doonesbury portrayed them very favorably, including former U.S. House Speaker Thomas "Tip" O'Neill and former California Governor Jerry Brown. A Blind trust is a trust in which the executors or those who have been given power of attorney have full discretion over the assets, and the trust beneficiaries have no knowledge of the holdings of the trust. ... For the whistleblower, see Gerald W. Brown. ...


The strip has also met controversy over every military conflict it has dealt with, including Vietnam, Grenada, Panama and both Gulf Wars. When Doonesbury ran the names of soldiers who had died in Iraq since the 2003 invasion, conservative commentators accused Garry Trudeau of using the American dead to make a profit for himself, and again demanded that the strip be removed from newspapers. Iraq war may refer to: Second Gulf War (2003–present), an ongoing conflict 2003 invasion of Iraq, began on March 20 Post-invasion Iraq, 2003-present, starting 1 May 2003 and Mission Accomplished Gulf War (1990–1991) (also called the Persian Gulf War, Operation Desert Storm, or First Gulf War...


After many letter writing campaigns demanding the removal of the strip were unsuccessful, conservatives changed their tactics, and instead of writing to newspaper editors, they began writing to one of the printers who prints the color Sunday comics. In 2005, Continental Features gave in to their demands, and refused to continue printing the Sunday Doonesbury, causing it to disappear from the 38 Sunday papers that Continental Features printed. Of the 38, only one newspaper The Anniston Star in Anniston, Alabama, continued to carry the Sunday Doonesbury, though of necessity in black and white. The Anniston Star is the daily newspaper serving Anniston, Alabama, and the surrounding six-county region. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ...


Some newspapers have dealt with the criticism by moving the strip from the comics page to the editorial page, because many people believe that a politically based comic strip like Doonesbury does not belong in a traditionally child-friendly comics section. The Lincoln Journal started the trend in 1973. In some papers (such as the Tulsa World) Doonesbury appears on the opinions page alongside Mallard Fillmore, a politically conservative comic strip. Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Lincoln Journal Star is Lincoln, Nebraskas major daily newspaper. ... The Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. ... For the U.S. President with a similar name, see Millard Fillmore. ... Conservatism is a political philosophy that usually favors traditional values and strong foreign defense. ...


Awards and honors

  • In 1975 the strip won Trudeau a Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning, the first strip cartoon to be so honored. It was also a Nominated Finalist in 1990, 2004, and 2005.
  • Trudeau received "Certificates of Achievement" from the US Army 4th Battalion 67th Armor Division and the Ready First Brigade in 1991 for his comic strips dealing with the first Gulf War. The texts of these citations are quoted on the back of the comic strip collection Welcome to Club Scud!
  • Trudeau won the Reuben Award from the National Cartoonists Society in 1995. [1]
  • Trudeau was awarded the US Army's Commander's Award for Public Service in 2006 for his series of strips about BD's recovery following the loss of his leg in Iraq. [2]

The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning has been awarded since 1922 for a distinguished cartoon or portfolio of cartoons published during the year, characterized by originality, editorial effectiveness, quality of drawing, and pictorial effect. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The Commanders Award for Public Service is the fourth highest honor the United States Department of the Army can bestow upon a civilian, ranking directly below the Outstanding Civilian Service Award. ...

Trivia

  • Long-time minor character Jim Andrews and the company he works for (Universal Petroleum) were named by Trudeau after his first editor at Universal Press Syndicate, Jim Andrews. The book The People's Doonesbury is dedicated in memory of Andrews.
  • Enzo Baldoni, the strip's long time Italian translator and a personal friend of G. B. Trudeau, was kidnapped and killed in Iraq where he was an independent reporter at the end of August 2004.

Enzo G. Baldoni (1948, Città di Castello, Umbria - August 26, 2004, undisclosed location, Iraq) was an Italian journalist working freelance and for the Italian news magazine Diario. ...

Published collections

The first collections of the comic strip Doonesbury were published in the early 1970s by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Blair, Walter and Hamlin Hill (1980). America's Humor: From Poor Richard to Doonesbury, First paperback edition, Oxford University Press, Page 511. ISBN 0-19-502756-6. 
  2. ^ Tina Gianoulis, "Doonesbury", St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture, 2002
  3. ^ Michael Kranish, Part 3: With antiwar role, high visibility, Boston Globe, June 17, 2003
  4. ^ The Cast, official list at Doonesbury.com
  5. ^ Jesse Walker, Doonesburied: The decline of Garry Trudeau -- and of baby boom liberalism, Reason Online, July 2002
  6. ^ Nat Gertler, in The Biggest Events in Comics History: 'Doonesbury' Finds Mitchell 'Guilty', Daryl Cagle's Professional Cartoonists Index, MSNBC
  7. ^ Ken Bode (DePauw University professor), 'Doonesbury' Belongs on the Editorial Page, Indianapolis Star, August 19, 2005
  8. ^ a b Aaron Glazer, Doonesbury delivers satirical satisfaction, The Johns Hopkins News-Letter, March 16, 2000
  9. ^ "Trudeau Recalls Doonesbury China Strips" p. 22 in The Comics Journal, no. 130 (July 1989).
  10. ^ 2 Dozen Newspapers Omit 'Doonesbury' Quayle Series, The New York Times, November 12, 1991
  11. ^ Anthony Marro, The Art of the Con (book review of Mark Singer's Citizen K: The Deeply Weird American Journey of Brett Kimberlin), Columbia Journalism Review, March/April 1997
  12. ^ Astor, David; "Major Southern California Dailies Drop 'Doonesbury'", Editor & Publisher, 13 November 1993
  13. ^ Doonesbury Daily Dose as retrieved via web.archive.org
  14. ^ Doonesbury creator falls for hoax, September 7, 2001
  15. ^ Sheerly Avni, "Doonesbury": Jerked off the funny pages, Salon, September 5, 2003
  16. ^ Bush National Guard offer at Doonesbury.com
  17. ^ No winner yet in 'Doonesbury' Bush search, Reuters/CNN.com, February 27, 2004
  18. ^ Joseph P. Kahn, 'Doonesbury' language gets some edits, Boston Globe, November 2, 2004
  19. ^ Exploding head pays tribute to Hunter S. Thompson, March 10, 2005
  20. ^ http://www.fisherhouse.org/inTheNews/injured_05_02_CC.shtml
  21. ^ Papers pull 'Doonesbury' over potty put-down, CBC, July 26, 2005
  22. ^ Katz, Ian. "My Doonesbury hell", The guardian, 2005-10-14.
  23. ^ Doonesbury@Slate - Miers' Strips. Retrieved on November 19, 2005.
  24. ^ Doonesbury still feisty after 35 years, Associated Press, November 17, 2005

November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the country’s national public radio and television broadcaster. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Trudeau, Garry (1984). Doonesbury: A Musical Comedy. Holt, Rinehart and Winston. ISBN 0-517-05491-4. 
  • Trudeau, Garry, Doonesbury Flashbacks CD-ROM for Microsoft Windows. Published by Mindscape, 1995.
  • NCS Awards

Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ...

External links

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Ink Pen is a comic strip by Phil Dunlap that started in 2005, and is part of the Universal Press Syndicate. ... The James Bond 007 gun logo James Bond 007 is a fictional British agent [1] created in 1952 by writer Ian Fleming, featured in several novels and short stories. ... The K Chronicles is the autobiographical comic strip of independent cartoonist Keith Knight. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... La Cucaracha is the name of a nationally syndicated daily comic strip by Lalo Alcaraz, which focuses on both Latino culture and politics. ... Liberty Meadows is a comic strip and comic book created, written and illustrated by Frank Cho. ... Liō strip from July 26, 2006. ... Lola Racing Cars (also Lola Cars International) is a racing car engineering company founded in 1961 by Eric Broadley and based in Huntingdon, United Kingdom. ... The Parable of the Lost Sheep is a parable told by Jesus in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Lucky Cow is a syndicated comic strip created by Mark Pett and distributed by Universal Press Syndicate. ... Mr. ... Minimum Security is a comic strip written and illustrated by Stephanie McMillan. ... Mixed media, in visual art, refers to an artwork in the making of which more than one medium has been employed. ... Momma Is a word used for an alternative to mother. ... Mutt and Jeff book collection of comic strips (1919). ... The Galápagos Islands hold 13 species of finches that are closely related and differ most markedly in the shape of their beaks. ... This article is about the logical fallacy. ... The Norm is a comic strip by Michael Jantze. ... On A Claire Day is a nationally syndicated comic strip created by Henry Beckett and Carla Ventresca. ... One Big Happy is a daily comic strip written and illustrated by Rick Detorie, detailing the daily adventures of a six-year-old girl named Ruthie. ... The Other Coast is a comic strip, drawn by Adrian Raeside. ... Overboard may refer to: Overboard – over the side of a ship or boat into the water Go overboard (colloquial) – To go to an extreme, especially as a result of great enthusiasm Overboard, a 1987 movie starring Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell Overboard, a comic strip about a group of pirates... pickles are a vegetable Pickles may refer to pickled vegetables (such as cucumbers) or: Eric Pickles (born 1952), British conservative politician James Pickles (born 1925), controversial British judge Wilfred Pickles (1904-1978), English actor and radio presenter Pickles (comic strip), created by Brian Crane Pickles (dog), The name of the... Pluggers is a syndicated comic panel created by Jeff MacNelly in 1993 that relies on reader submissions (referred to as Pluggerisms) for the premise of each days panel. ... Pooch Café is a comic strip written and illustrated by Paul Gilligan. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... PreTeena, sometimes spelled Preteena, is a daily American comic strip written and drawn by Allison Barrows and syndicated by Universal Press Syndicate since 2001. ... Prickly City is a daily comic strip drawn by Scott Stantis, the conservative editorial cartoonist for the Birmingham News, and distributed through Universal Press Syndicate. ... Real Life Adventures is a nationally syndicated comic strip created by Lance Aldrich and Gary Wise. ... Red meat or mammal meat refers to all meat that is derived from mammals, and is unrelated to the actual color of the meat. ... now. ... Ronaldinho Ronaldo de Assis Moreira (born March 21, 1980 in Porto Alegre, Brazil), better known as Ronaldinho (Little Ronaldo), is regarded as one of the worlds top football players. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Shoe is the name of a comic strip that was written and drawn by its creator Jeff MacNelly until his death in 2000. ... Slowpoke is a weekly comic strip by Jen Sorensen that appears in alternative weeklies and other publications in the United States. ... Speed bump made of asphalt A speed bump (British English a speed or road hump, sometimes colloquially a sleeping policeman) is a traffic calming tool designed to slow traffic or reduce through traffic. ... The fable of the stone soup is about co-operation amid scarcity. ... Strange Brew is also the title of a song by the band Cream (released on their 1967 album Disraeli Gears), and of a compilation album - Strange Brew: The Very Best of Cream Strange Brew is a 1983 film starring the popular SCTV characters Bob & Doug McKenzie, played by Dave Thomas... Sylvia is either: a feminine given name of Latin origin, also spelled Silvia Sylvia Plath, an American poet a genus of bird, commonly known as typical warblers the asteroid 87 Sylvia one of three films: Sylvia (1965 film), a 1965 film Sylvia (1985 film), a 1985 New Zealand film Sylvia... Tank McNamara is a comic strip by Jeff Millar and Bill Hinds. ... The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. ... Tiny Sepuku is a syndicated comic strip based around a character named Tiny who answers questions from his readers and generally dispenses love advice. ... Tom the Dancing Bug is a weekly comic strip by Ruben Bolling which presents critical commentary on modern life, current events, and conventional wisdom and cliches. ... Too Much Coffee Man is a satirical comic strip, created by Shannon Wheeler. ... Trevor can be a male given name or a surname. ... Watch Your Head is a daily comic strip written and illustrated by Cory Thomas, focusing on the lives of six students at Oliver Otis University, a fictional Historically Black university. ... Wee Pals is a syndicated comic strip about a diverse group of children, created by Morrie Turner. ... Edward Winnie-the-Pooh Bear, sometimes referred to as Pooh, is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... The Wizard of Id on the cover of an Italian collection of his stories. ... Woring It Out was a situation comedy broadcast in the United States by NBC as part of its 1990 fall lineup. ... Yenny is a daily webcomic by Puerto Rican comic artist David Alvarez. ... Ziggy is a daily single panel cartoon created by Tom Wilson, an American Greetings executive. ...


Lifestyle columnists: Dear Abby | Consejos | Cookbook Nook | Creating Spaces | Double Duty Dinners | Figuratively Speaking | Focus on the Family | Hollywood and Line | Kids Talk About God | Mr. Handyperson | The Last Word in Astrology | News of the Weird | Scott Burns | 7-Day Menu Planner | Smart Moves | Supermarket Sampler | Tell Me A Story | On Computers | On Ethics | Pet Connection Dear Abby is the most popular syndicated advice column which was founded in 1956 by Pauline Esther Friedman Phillips and is currently written by her daughter, Abigail Van Buren, also know as Jeanne Phillips. ... Focus on the Family (FOTF or FotF), founded in 1977, is a Christian non-profit organization based in the United States. ... News of the Weird is a syndicated newspaper column that collects bizarre news stories. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Opinion columnists: As I See It | William F. Buckley, Jr. | Ann Coulter | Maggie Gallagher | Georgie Anne Geyer | James J. Kilpatrick | John Leo | National Perspective | Ted Rall | Richard Reeves | Woman to Woman William F. Buckley, Jr. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... Maggie Gallagher is a United States writer and commentator who has written a syndicated column for Universal Press Syndicate since 1995. ... Georgie Anne Geyer is an American journalist and columnist for the Universal Press Syndicate. ... James J. Kilpatrick is a conservative columnist. ... John Leo John Leo is a contributing editor and columnist for U.S. News & World Report. ... A Ted Rall cartoon depicting John Kerry and George W. Bush. ... Richard Reeves is a writer, syndicated columnist and lecturer at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. ... Woman to Woman (1983) was a female-oriented discussion show, syndicated nationally in America. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Doonesbury (736 words)
Trudeau began publishing Doonesbury as a student at Yale University in 1968, where it appeared in the Yale Daily News as "Bull Tales".
Doonesbury delved into a number of political issues, causing controversies, and breaking new ground on the comics pages.
Doonesbury has also taken the form of a stage show and an animated special.
Doonesbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2986 words)
Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world.
Doonesbury began as a continuation of Bull Tales, which appeared in the Yale University student newspaper, the Yale Daily News, beginning September 1968.
Doonesbury has angered, irritated, or been rebuked by many of the political figures that have appeared or been referred to in the strip over the years.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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