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Encyclopedia > Doom II
Doom II: Hell on Earth
The cover artwork for Doom II: Hell on Earth, painted by fantasy artist Gerald Brom, depicts the Doom space marine firing a shotgun at a Cyberdemon.
Developer(s) id Software
Publisher(s) GT Interactive
Engine The Doom engine
Release date(s) October 10, 1994
Genre(s) First-person shooter
Mode(s) Single player
Multiplayer (cooperative)
Multiplayer (deathmatch)
Rating(s) ESRB: Mature (M)
ESRB: Teen (T) (GBA)
BBFC: 15
OFLC: MA15+
RSAC: V3: Blood and gore
L1: Mild expletives
Platform(s) PC (DOS, Windows 95), GBA, Tapwave Zodiac (most ports for the original DOOM also support DOOM II)
Media 3½" floppy disk, compact disc
"Doom 2" redirects here. For planned sequel of the movie starring Charles Spencer, see Doom (film)#Doom 2.

Doom II: Hell on Earth is a first-person shooter video game created by id Software. It was originally released on the IBM PC on September 30, 1994. It is the sequel to the popular and revolutionary game Doom, which was released a year earlier. In 1995, Doom II won the Origins Award for Best Fantasy or Science Fiction Computer Game of 1994. Unlike Doom which was initially only available through shareware and mail order, Doom II was a commercial release sold in stores. Cover artwork for the computer game Doom II: Hell on Earth by id Software. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates computer or video games. ... id Software (IPA: /id soft. ... Video game publishers are companies that publish video games that they have either developed internally or have had developed by a video game developer. ... GT Interactive was a video game developer founded in 1993 and headquartered in New York City. ... A game engine is the core software component of a computer or video game or other interactive application with real-time graphics. ... Doom Engine is a psychedelic doom metal band based in Oxfordshire. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Computer and video games are generally and popularly categorised into genres. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In computer games and video games, single-player refers to the variant of a particular game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. ... Online gaming redirects here. ... Doom popularised co-op on the PC. Cooperative gameplay (often abbreviated as co-op) primarily refers to a feature in video games that allows players to work together as teammates with the absence of player-controlled competitors. ... Deathmatch (abbreviated DM) is a widely-used gameplay mode very well integrated into first-person shooter computer games. ... The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) is a self-regulatory organization that applies and enforces ratings, advertising guidelines, and online privacy principles for computer and video games in the United States. ... The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) is a self-regulatory organization that applies and enforces ratings, advertising guidelines, and online privacy principles for computer and video games in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) is the organisation responsible for film classification (see Motion picture rating systems and History of British Film Certificates) within the United Kingdom. ... The Office of Film and Literature Classification is a statutory classification body which provides day to day administrative support for the Classification Board which classified films, computer games and publications in Australia, and the Classification Review Board which reviews films, computer games and publications when a valid application has been... The Recreational Software Advisory Council (RSAC) was an independent, non-profit organization founded in the USA in 1994 by the Software Publishers Association as well as six other industry leaders in response to video game controversy and threats of government regulation. ... One of the first PCs from IBM - the IBM PC model 5150. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Microsoft Windows is a family of operating systems by Microsoft. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image:Tapzodiac. ... Doom (or DOOM)[1] is a 1993 computer game by id Software that is among the landmark titles in the first-person shooter genre. ... A 3. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Doom is a 2005 movie adaptation of the popular Doom series of video games produced by id Software. ... Doom is a 2005 movie adaptation of the popular Doom series of video games produced by id Software. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Namcos Pac-Man was a hit, and became a cultural phenomenon. ... id Software (IPA: /id soft. ... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Doom (or DOOM)[1] is a 1993 computer game by id Software that is among the landmark titles in the first-person shooter genre. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Origins Awards, presented by the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts and Design, are presented at the Origins International Game Expo for outstanding work in the game industry. ...

Contents

[edit]

Story

Immediately following the events in Doom, the player once again takes the role of the nameless space marine (although named "Flynn Taggart" in the Doom novels) who has proven too tough for the forces of Hell to contain. After being teleported from Phobos, and subsequently fighting on Deimos which is hanging on top of Hell itself, the Marine is back home on Earth, only to find that it too has fallen victim to the hellish invasion. The Doom Marine battles a horde of demons, as seen on the cover of the Doom 1 game box The Doomguy, also known as Doom Dude, or The Marine, is the protagonist of the Doom series of computer and video games created by id Software. ... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is a place or a state of pain and suffering. ... Phobos (IPA , Greek Φόβος: Fright), is the larger and innermost of Mars two moons, and is named after Phobos, son of Ares (Mars) from Greek Mythology. ... Deimos (IPA or ; Greek Δείμος: Dread), is the smaller and outermost of Mars’ two moons, named after Deimos from Greek Mythology. ...


The player progresses through 30 levels (32 including two secretly accessed levels), and on the way he learns that the remaining survivors of Earth's population are being held on Earth and the only means of escape is the space port with massive ships that can carry the remains of Earth's population into space. However the demons know this and have placed a fire force field over the space port, so that ships cannot land or leave. The marine must battle his way through the infested space port and deactivate that fire force field. Once humanity is finally evacuated from the ravaged, infested planet, the Marine is the only human left on Earth. He sits and waits for death, content in the knowledge that he has saved his species, giving them a chance to continue on elsewhere. Only minutes pass before the Marine receives an off-planet transmission - humans in orbit have managed to find out where the armies of Hell are spilling from. If the Marine can reach this gateway, he can thwart the invasion once and for all. In computer and video games, a level (sometimes called a stage, course, episode, round, world, map, wave, board, phase, or landscape) is a separate area in a games virtual world, in modern games typically representing a specific location such as a building or a city. ...


The Marine wearily pulls himself to his feet and moves off to the portal, cutting a swathe through the demons in his path before finally arriving at the gateway. He sees no way to close it on this side, and so he grits his teeth and dives through to find a solution. In the game's own words, "what do you care if you have to go through Hell to do it?"


The Marine finally reaches the home of the "largest demon (he has) ever seen." Once the player fires enough rockets into the exposed brain of the demon, dodging constant attacks from lesser demons the larger one summons, the demon (known as the 'Icon of Sin') explodes, devastating Hell in its death throes. When the chaos finally ceases, Hell is in ruins, the invasion permanently halted. The Marine wipes his brow and begins the long journey home, looking forward to helping to rebuild Earth. The Icon of Sin as the final boss in Doom 2 Spoiler warning: The Icon of Sin is the final boss in Doom 2 and both chapters of Final Doom. ...

[edit]

Gameplay developments

Doom II was not a dramatically different game from its predecessor. There were no major technological developments, no major graphical improvements, and no real changes in fundamental gameplay. The game still consisted of the player negotiating non-linear levels, picking up keys to unlock new areas, and of course shooting down hundreds upon hundreds of monsters.


The main additions to the game were the additional monsters available for the player to fight. The new enemies are as follows:

  • The Hell Knight.
  • The Heavy Weapons Dude.
  • The Mancubus.
  • The Revenant.
  • The Arachnotron.
  • The Pain Elemental.
  • The Arch-Vile.
  • The end boss, called the Icon of Sin / John Romero.
In this screenshot from Doom II: Hell on Earth, the player has just fired the double-barrelled shotgun, thus disabling a chaingun-equipped zombie.
In this screenshot from Doom II: Hell on Earth, the player has just fired the double-barrelled shotgun, thus disabling a chaingun-equipped zombie.

The SS trooper from Wolfenstein 3D appears in the two secret levels, which are throwbacks in design (and music) to the Wolfenstein 3D game. Also, a hanged Commander Keen figure makes a cameo in the second secret level. The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967) is a well-known game designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. ... This image is a screenshot of Doom II: Hell on Earth, the sequel to the Doom computer game. ... This image is a screenshot of Doom II: Hell on Earth, the sequel to the Doom computer game. ... Wolfenstein 3D (commonly abbreviated to Wolf 3D) is the computer game that started the first person shooter genre on the PC. It was created by id Software and published by Apogee Software on May 5, 1992. ... Yorp redirects here. ...


The only new weapon addition was the double-barreled shotgun, which could fire out 21 pellets instead of the regular shotgun's seven, making it very useful in dispatching Demons, Cacodemons, and any form of medium-sized monster. A pump-action and two semi-automatic action shotguns, 20 boxes of shotgun shells, a clay trap, and three boxes of clay pigeons. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ... The following are enemies in the id Software first-person shooter computer and video games Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. ...


There was also one new item created, the Megasphere, a tan sphere that could give the player 200% armor and health.


A small change in gameplay was instituted. Instead of the player playing through three related episodes, gameplay takes place over one giant episode, albeit there are interludes for when the story develops. Instead of watching the player's progress on a map (as in the original episodes of Doom), the screens between each level simply show a background. It also meant that the player would not have to start over with a pistol every eight or nine levels (as was the case in Doom, since each episode consisted of nine levels, including bonus levels).


The level design, much like in Doom, was supposed to mimic the areas the player was going into. Now that the game was taking place on Earth, a real-world look was attempted, with some levels taking place in certain kinds of military installations, and others taking place in residential areas. Some areas do resemble places on Earth (like Downtown), but most simply seem strange due to engine limitations. Eventually level designs no longer attempt to appear realistic, but by then the player has left the normal non-warped Earth.


In general, Doom II was well-received and went on to sell 2 million copies, making it the highest-selling id Software game to date.


Elements from the game would be used in Final Doom. Final Doom is a first-person shooter computer game that uses the game engine, items and characters from Doom II. It consists of two 32-level megawads (level files), TNT: Evilution by brothers Dario and Milo Casali and TeamTNT, and The Plutonia Experiment by the Casali brothers. ...

[edit]

Levels

A * denotes a non-redundant track

Name Level design Music
MAP01: Entryway Sandy Petersen Running from Evil
MAP02: Underhalls American McGee The Healer Stalks
MAP03: The Gauntlet American McGee Countdown to Death
MAP04: The Focus American McGee Between Levels*
MAP05: The Waste Tunnels American McGee DOOM
MAP06: The Crusher American McGee In the Dark
MAP07: Dead Simple American McGee/Sandy Petersen Shawn's got the Shotgun
MAP08: Tricks and Traps Sandy Petersen The Dave D. Taylor Blues
MAP09: The Pit Sandy Petersen Into Sandy's City*
MAP10: Refueling Base Sandy Petersen/Tom Hall The Demon's Dead
MAP11: Circle of Death/The 'O' of Destruction John Romero The Healer Stalks
MAP12: The Factory Sandy Petersen In the Dark
MAP13: Downtown Sandy Petersen DOOM
MAP14: The Inmost Dens Sandy Petersen The Dave D. Taylor Blues
MAP15: Industrial Zone John Romero Running from Evil
MAP16: Suburbs Sandy Petersen The Demon's Dead
MAP17: Tenements John Romero The Healer Stalks
MAP18: The Courtyard Sandy Petersen Waiting for Romero to Play
MAP19: The Citadel Sandy Petersen Shawn's got the Shotgun
MAP20: Gotcha! John Romero Message for the Archvile
MAP21: Nirvana Sandy Petersen Countdown to Death
MAP22: The Catacombs Sandy Petersen The Dave D. Taylor Blues
MAP23: Barrels o' Fun Sandy Petersen Bye Bye American Pie*
MAP24: The Chasm Sandy Petersen In the Dark
MAP25: Bloodfalls Shawn Green Adrian's Asleep*
MAP26: The Abandoned Mines John Romero Message for the Archvile
MAP27: Monster Condo Sandy Petersen Waiting for Romero to Play
MAP28: The Spirit World Sandy Petersen Getting Too Tense*
MAP29: The Living End John Romero Shawn's got the Shotgun
MAP30: Icon of Sin Sandy Petersen Opening to Hell*
MAP31: Wolfenstein Sandy Petersen Evil Incarnate*
MAP32: Grosse Sandy Petersen The Ultimate Conquest*
[edit]

Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... American McGee: Selected on November 2002 by PC Gamer as one of the future Game Gods. ... American McGee: Selected on November 2002 by PC Gamer as one of the future Game Gods. ... American McGee: Selected on November 2002 by PC Gamer as one of the future Game Gods. ... American McGee: Selected on November 2002 by PC Gamer as one of the future Game Gods. ... American McGee: Selected on November 2002 by PC Gamer as one of the future Game Gods. ... American McGee: Selected on November 2002 by PC Gamer as one of the future Game Gods. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Tom Hall Tom Hall is a game designer born in Wisconsin. ... Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967) is a well-known game designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967) is a well-known game designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967) is a well-known game designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967) is a well-known game designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967) is a well-known game designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967) is a well-known game designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ...

MAP30: Icon of Sin

Level 30 is the game's final challenge along the normal sequence of levels. Upon noticing the player, the final boss says the following phrase backward: "To win the game you must kill me, John Romero." John Romero, the game's chief designer, has his head impaled upon a stick in a small room behind the final boss; this is only accessible via cheat codes.

[edit]

MAP31: Wolfenstein

Level 31 is the infamous secret level along with its follow-on MAP32: Grosse. This level was created by Sandy Petersen. The Nazi enemies were borrowed from Wolfenstein 3D, a game by id Software and published by Apogee Software. Sandy Petersen Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen (born September 16, 1955) is a game designer. ... Wolfenstein 3D (commonly abbreviated to Wolf 3D) is the computer game that started the first person shooter genre on the PC. It was created by id Software and published by Apogee Software on May 5, 1992. ... id Software (IPA: /id soft. ... Corporate logo of Apogee Software Apogee Software, Ltd. ...


This level was inspired by the first level on Wolfenstein 3D except that there are parts of the level with varied altitudes. This level can be accessed via MAP15: Industrial Zone. It is missing in all German releases of the game, as it features certain symbolism banned in Germany (swastikas etc.). A right-facing Swastika in decorative Hindu form For the town in Ontario, see Swastika, Ontario. ...

[edit]

MAP32: Grosse

As with Level 31, Grosse contains Wolfenstein tilesets and is not included in German releases; it may be accessed from Level 31 in most versions other than the German and Playstation releases. It is notable primarily for its inclusion of four hanging images of Commander Keen, which the player must shoot to exit the level.
Yorp redirects here. ...

  • Both of the secret levels appear on the Gameboy Advance editions, however, although some Nazi-symbols may now be removed.
[edit]

See also

Computer and video games Portal
  • 30uv1437 All-time fastest tool-assisted playthrough of all 32 levels
[edit]

Image File history File links Nuvola_apps_package_games. ...

References

  • Level credits: "Doom Credits" (last updated 7 January, 1998, retrieved 27 October, 2004) by John Romero, available as part of the archived copy of Lee Killough's Doom pages on Romero's website.
[edit]

Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967) is a well-known game designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. ... Lee Killough is a name used by two noteworthy people: Karen Lee Killough, American writer Lee Killough, programmer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

External links

Official product websites
Databases
Fan sites

  Results from FactBites:
 
Doom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3905 words)
Doom was not the first first-person shooter with a deathmatch mode—MIDI Maze on the Atari ST had one in 1987, using the MIDI ports built into the ST to network up to four machines together.
Doom was and remains notorious for its high levels of violence, gore, and satanic imagery, which have generated much controversy from a broad range of groups.
Doom prompted fears that the then-emerging virtual reality technology could be used to simulate extremely realistic killing, and in 1994 led to unsuccessful attempts by Washington state senator Phil Talmadge to introduce compulsory licensing of VR use.
Doom II: Hell on Earth - definition of Doom II: Hell on Earth in Encyclopedia (928 words)
The cover artwork for Doom II, painted by fantasy artist Gerald Brom, depicts the Doom space marine firing a shotgun at a gigantic Cyberdemon.
Doom II was not a dramatically different game from its predecessor.
In general, Doom II was well-received but was regarded in some areas as a disappointment.
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