FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Donald Regan
Donald Thomas Regan
Donald Regan

In office
January 22, 1981 – February 1, 1985
President Ronald Reagan
Preceded by G. William Miller
Succeeded by James Baker

In office
1985 – 1987
President Ronald Reagan
Preceded by James Baker
Succeeded by Howard Baker

Born December 21, 1918(1918-12-21)
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Died June 10 2003 (aged 84)
Williamsburg, Virginia
Political party Republican
Spouse Ann Buchanan Regan
Profession Businessman, Politician

Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Ronald Reagan Administration, where he advocated "Reaganomics" and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate production. Regan was criticized for his Prime Ministerial style of working, for his involvement in the Iran-Contra Affair, and for his frequent disagreements with Ronald Reagan's wife, First Lady Nancy Reagan. Image File history File links Donaldtregan1. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Chairman Miller, Time, 1978 Millers signature, as used on American currency George William Miller (March 9, 1925 – March 17, 2006) served as the 65th United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Carter from August 6, 1979 to January 20, 1981. ... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Reagan redirects here. ... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush. ... Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... A businessman (sometimes businesswoman, female; or businessperson, gender neutral) is a generic term for a wide range of people engaged in profit-oriented enterprises, generally the management of a company. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Headed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan from 1981 to 1989, the Presidency of Ronald Reagan, also known as the Reagan Administration, was conservative, steadfastly anti-Communist, employed a foreign policy of “peace through strength”, and favored tax cuts and smaller government. ... Ronald Reagan, the US president from which Reaganomics derives its name Reaganomics (a blend of Reagan and economics, coined by radio broadcaster Paul Harvey) is a term that has been used to both describe and decry free market advocacy economic policies of U.S. President Ronald Reagan, who served from... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... SmartHunt Your Next Job Monster CareerBuilder Yahoo HotJobs Indeed Manpower Beyondplanet Bixee. ... There is a Prime Minister of the United States, but nonetheless, the term Prime Minister has sometimes been applied, either as a pejorative term, a bon mot or through ignorance, to an official within the government of the United States. ... The Iran-Contra Affair was a political scandal occurring in 1987 as a result of earlier events during the Reagan administration in which members of the executive branch sold weapons to Iran, an avowed enemy, and illegally used the profits to continue funding anti-Communist rebels, the Contras, in Nicaragua. ... Reagan redirects here. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of the former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ...

Contents

Early life

Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, of Irish Catholic extraction, Don Regan earned his bachelor's degree in English from Harvard University in 1940 and attended Harvard Law School before dropping out to join the United States Marine Corps at the outset of World War II. He reached the rank of lieutenant colonel while serving in the Pacific theater, and was involved in five major campaigns including Guadalcanal and Okinawa. During his time at Harvard, Regan joined the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity. Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Irish Catholics are persons of predominantly Irish descent who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith. ... For other degrees, see Academic degree. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... The Pacific Theater of Operations (PTO) is the term used in the United States for all military activity in the Pacific Ocean and the countries bordering it, in World War II. Pacific War is a more common name, around the world, for the broader conflict between the Allies and Japan... Guadalcanal, position (inset) and main towns Guadalcanal is a 2,510 square mile (6 500 km²) island in the Pacific Ocean and a province of the Solomon Islands. ... This article is about the prefecture. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Wall Street

After the War, he joined Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. in 1946, as an account executive trainee, working up through the ranks, eventually taking over as Merrill Lynch's chairman and CEO in 1971, the year the company went public. He held those positions until 1980. Merrill Lynch & Co. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Regan was one of the original directors of the Securities Investor Protection Corporation and was vice chairman of the New York Stock Exchange from 1973 to 1975. The Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC) is a Federally mandated insurance company that protects securities investors from harm if a broker/dealer defaults. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Regan's signature, as used on American currency
Regan's signature, as used on American currency

Regan was a major proponent of brokerage firms going public, which he viewed as an important step in the modernization of Wall Street; under his supervision, Merrill Lynch had their IPO on June 23, 1971, becoming only the second Wall Street firm to go public, after Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. Image File history File links Donald Regans signature, used on American currency. ... Image File history File links Donald Regans signature, used on American currency. ... “IPO” redirects here. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette was an investment bank founded by William H. Donaldson, Richard Jenrette and Dan Lufkin in 1959. ...


During his tenure in these two positions, Regan also pushed hard for an end to minimum fixed commissions for brokers, which were fees that brokerage companies had to charge clients for every transaction they made on the clients' behalf; Regan saw them as a cartel-like restriction. In a large part thanks to his lobbying, fixed commissions were abolished in 1975. For the American pop-punk band, see Cartel (band). ...


Reagan administration

President Ronald Reagan selected Regan in 1981 to serve as Treasury secretary, marking him as a spokesman for his economic policies, dubbed "Reaganomics." He helped engineer tax reform, reduce income tax rates and ease tax burdens on corporations. Regan unexpectedly swapped jobs with then White House Chief of Staff James Baker in 1985. As Chief of Staff, Regan was very involved in the day to day management of White House policy, which led Howard Baker, Regan's successor as Chief of Staff, to give a rebuke that Regan was becoming a "Prime Minister" inside an increasingly complex Imperial Presidency. Regan resigned from his post in 1987 due to his involvement with the Iran-Contra Affair, and frequent clashes with the President's wife, First Lady Nancy Reagan. Regan was seen as the fall guy for the affair, and the tongue-in-cheek saying "Reagan had Regan" echoed throughout Washington.[1][ http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9B0DE7DA1130F932A05754C0A961948260] Regan's book, For the Record: From Wall Street to Washington (ISBN 0-15-163966-3), exposes his disagreements with First Lady Nancy Reagan including claims that Nancy's personal astrologer, Joan Quigley, helped steer the President's speaking decisions.[citation needed] Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Ronald Reagan, the US president from which Reaganomics derives its name Reaganomics (a blend of Reagan and economics, coined by radio broadcaster Paul Harvey) is a term that has been used to both describe and decry free market advocacy economic policies of U.S. President Ronald Reagan, who served from... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush. ... Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... There is a Prime Minister of the United States, but nonetheless, the term Prime Minister has sometimes been applied, either as a pejorative term, a bon mot or through ignorance, to an official within the government of the United States. ... The Imperial Presidency is a term used from the 1960s and made popular by the historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. ... The Iran-Contra Affair was a political scandal occurring in 1987 as a result of earlier events during the Reagan administration in which members of the executive branch sold weapons to Iran, an avowed enemy, and illegally used the profits to continue funding anti-Communist rebels, the Contras, in Nicaragua. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of the former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ... A fall guy is a scapegoat, a person who takes the blame for someone elses actions, or someone at the butt of jokes. ... Sarcasm is the making of remarks intended to mock the person referred to (who is normally the person addressed), a situation or thing. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... An astrologer practices one or more forms of astrology. ... Joan Quigley, of San Francisco, is a famous astrologer best known for her top secret devotion to the Reagan White House in the 1980s. ...


Retirement

Regan retired quietly in Virginia with Ann Buchanan Regan, his wife of over sixty years. Late in life, he spent nearly ten hours a day in his art studio painting landscapes, some of which sold for thousands of dollars and still hang in museums.[citation needed] Regan had four children and nine grandchildren. This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Regan died of heart failure at the age of 84 in a hospital near his home in Williamsburg, Virginia. Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


External links

  • Biography as Secretary of the Treasury
Preceded by
G. William Miller
United States Secretary of the Treasury
19811985
Succeeded by
James Baker
Preceded by
James Baker
White House Chief of Staff
19851987
Succeeded by
Howard Baker

  Results from FactBites:
 
Donald Regan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (460 words)
Regan was one of the original directors of the Securities Investment Protection Corporation and was vice chairman of the New York Stock Exchange from 1973 to 1975.
Regan unexpectedly switched jobs with then White House Chief of Staff James Baker in 1985, a position he kept until 1987, when he was pressured to resign for his involvement with the Iran-Contra affair (he was also clashing with First Lady Nancy Reagan).
Regan was seen as the fall guy for the affair, and the tounge-in-cheek saying "Reagan had Regan" echoed throughout Washington.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m