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Encyclopedia > Donald Knuth
Donald Ervin Knuth
Photographed by Jacob Appelbaum, 25 October 2005
Photographed by Jacob Appelbaum, 25 October 2005
Born 10 January 1938
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Residence USA
Nationality US
Field Computer science
Institutions Stanford University
Alma mater Case Institute of Technology
California Institute of Technology
Academic advisor   Marshall Hall, Jr.
Notable students   Vaughan Pratt
Robert Sedgewick
Jeffrey Vitter
Known for The Art of Computer Programming
TeX, METAFONT
Knuth–Morris–Pratt algorithm
Knuth-Bendix completion algorithm
MMIX
Notable prizes John von Neumann Medal (1995)
Turing Award (1974)
Kyoto Prize (1996)

Donald Ervin Knuth ([knuːθ] or "Ka-NOOTH"[1], Chinese: 高德纳[2]) (b. 10 January 1938) is a renowned computer scientist and Professor Emeritus of the Art of Computer Programming[3] at Stanford University. Image File history File links KnuthAtOpenContentAlliance. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: Location of Milwaukee in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Coordinates: , County Milwaukee Government  - Mayor Tom Barrett Area  - City  97 sq mi (251. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... United States may refer to: Places: United States of America SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, with some residence halls on the south end of campus located in Cleveland Heights. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Marshall Hall, Jr. ... Vaughan Pratt is Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at Stanford University. ... For other men with the same name, see Robert Sedgewick Robert Sedgewick is the author of the celebrated book series Algorithms, published by Addison-Wesley. ... Jeffrey Scott Vitter (born 1955 in New Orleans, Louisiana) serves as the Frederick L. Hovde Dean of Science at Purdue University. ... Cover of books The Art of Computer Programming[1] is a comprehensive monograph written by Donald Knuth which covers many kinds of programming algorithms and their analysis. ... TeX (IPA: as in Greek, often in English; written with a lowercase e in imitation of the logo) is a typesetting system created by Donald Knuth. ... METAFONT is a programming language used to define vector fonts. ... The Knuth–Morris–Pratt string searching algorithm searches for occurrences of a word W within a main text string S by employing the simple observation that when a mismatch occurs, the word itself embodies sufficient information to determine where the next match could begin, thus bypassing re-examination of previously... The Knuth-Bendix completion algorithm is an algorithm for transforming a set of equations (over terms) into a confluent term rewriting system. ... MMIX is a 64-bit RISC virtual machine designed by Donald Knuth, with significant contributions by John Hennessy (who designed the MIPS chip) and Dick Sites (who was the architect of the Alpha chip). ... The IEEE John von Neumann Medal was established by the IEEE Board of Directors in 1990 and may be presented annually for outstanding achievements in computer-related science and technology. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... The Kyoto Prize (京都賞) has been awarded annually since 1984 by the Inamori Foundation, founded by Kazuo Inamori (fortune from ceramics). ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ...


Author of the seminal multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming[4], Knuth has been called the ‘father’ of the analysis of algorithms, contributing to the development of and systematizing formal mathematical techniques for the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms, and in the process popularizing asymptotic notation. Cover of books The Art of Computer Programming[1] is a comprehensive monograph written by Donald Knuth which covers many kinds of programming algorithms and their analysis. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Analysis of algorithms. ... Big O notation is often used to describe how the size of the input data affects an algorithms running time. ...


In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is also the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces. Computer science (informally, CS or compsci) is, in its most general sense, the study of computation and information processing, both in hardware and in software. ... TeX (IPA: as in Greek, often in English; written with a lowercase e in imitation of the logo) is a typesetting system created by Donald Knuth. ... METAFONT is a programming language used to define vector fonts. ... Sample text in Computer Modern Computer Modern is the family of typefaces used by default by the typesetting program TeX. It was created by Donald Knuth with his METAFONT program, and was most recently updated in 1992. ...


A prolific writer and scholar[5], Knuth is also creator of the WEB/CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, as well as designer of the MMIX instruction set architecture. Look up web in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... CWEB is a computer programming system created by Donald Knuth and Silvio Levy as a followup to Knuths WEB literate programming system, using the C programming language instead of Pascal. ... Literate programming is the writing of computer programs primarily for human beings to read, similar to a work of literature; hence the name literate programming. ... MMIX is a 64-bit RISC virtual machine designed by Donald Knuth, with significant contributions by John Hennessy (who designed the MIPS chip) and Dick Sites (who was the architect of the Alpha chip). ... It has been suggested that some sections of this article be split into a new article entitled instruction set architecture. ...

Contents

Education and academic work

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he received his bachelor's degree and master's degree in mathematics (simultaneously, his B.S. work being regarded as deserving a master's degree) in 1960 at the Case Institute of Technology (now part of Case Western Reserve University). In 1963, he earned a Ph.D. in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology, where he became a professor and began work on The Art of Computer Programming, originally planned to be a single book, and then planned as a seven-volume series. In 1968, he published the first volume. That same year, he joined the faculty of Stanford University. Nickname: Location of Milwaukee in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Coordinates: , County Milwaukee Government  - Mayor Tom Barrett Area  - City  97 sq mi (251. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, with some residence halls on the south end of campus located in Cleveland Heights. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, with some residence halls on the south end of campus located in Cleveland Heights. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Cover of books The Art of Computer Programming[1] is a comprehensive monograph written by Donald Knuth which covers many kinds of programming algorithms and their analysis. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ...


In 1971, Knuth was the recipient of the first ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award. He has received various other awards including the Turing Award, the National Medal of Science, the John von Neumann Medal and the Kyoto Prize. After producing the third volume of his series in 1976, he expressed such frustration with the nascent state of the then newly developed electronic publishing tools (esp. those which provided input to phototypesetters) that he took time out to work on typesetting and created the TeX and METAFONT tools. The Association for Computing Machinery, or ACM, was founded in 1947 as the worlds first scientific and educational computing society. ... Although many awards have added Grace Hoppers name to them since her death in 1992, the original Grace Murray Hopper Awards have been awarded by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) since 1971. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... The IEEE John von Neumann Medal was established by the IEEE Board of Directors in 1990 and may be presented annually for outstanding achievements in computer-related science and technology. ... The Kyoto Prize (京都賞) has been awarded annually since 1984 by the Inamori Foundation, founded by Kazuo Inamori (fortune from ceramics). ... TeX (IPA: as in Greek, often in English; written with a lowercase e in imitation of the logo) is a typesetting system created by Donald Knuth. ... METAFONT is a programming language used to define vector fonts. ...


In recognition of Knuth's contributions to the field of computer science, in 1990 he was awarded the singular academic title of Professor of The Art of Computer Programming, which has since been revised to Professor Emeritus of The Art of Computer Programming. Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Emeritus (IPA pronunciation: or ) is an adjective that is used in the title of a retired professor, bishop or other professional. ...


In 1992 he became an associate of the French Academy of Sciences. Also that year, he retired from regular research and teaching at Stanford University in order to finish The Art of Computer Programming. In 2003 he was elected as a foreign member of the Royal Society. As of 2004, the first three volumes of his series have been re-issued, and Knuth is currently working on volume four, excerpts of which are released periodically on his website. Meanwhile, Knuth gives informal lectures a few times a year at Stanford University, which he calls Computer Musings. He is also a visiting professor at the Oxford University Computing Laboratory in the United Kingdom. Louis XIV visiting the Académie in 1671 The French Academy of Sciences (Académie des sciences) is a learned society, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV at the suggestion of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, to encourage and protect the spirit of French scientific research. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ... Cover of books The Art of Computer Programming[1] is a comprehensive monograph written by Donald Knuth which covers many kinds of programming algorithms and their analysis. ... The premises of The Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ... The Oxford University Computing Laboratory (OUCL) is the computer science department at Oxford University in England. ...


In addition to his writings on computer science, Knuth is also the author of 3:16 Bible Texts Illuminated (1991), ISBN 0-89579-252-4, in which he attempts to examine the Bible by a process of stratified random sampling, namely an analysis of chapter 3, verse 16 of each book. Each verse is accompanied by a rendering in calligraphic art, contributed by a group of calligraphers under the leadership of Hermann Zapf. In statistics, stratified sampling is a method of sampling from a population. ... Hermann Zapf (born in Nuremberg, Germany on November 8, 1918) is a prolific German typeface designer. ...


Awards

The Association for Computing Machinery, or ACM, was founded in 1947 as the worlds first scientific and educational computing society. ... Although many awards have added Grace Hoppers name to them since her death in 1992, the original Grace Murray Hopper Awards have been awarded by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) since 1971. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The IEEE John von Neumann Medal was established by the IEEE Board of Directors in 1990 and may be presented annually for outstanding achievements in computer-related science and technology. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Computer Science Faculty Building Architecture and Town Planning Faculty building The Technion – Israel Institute of Technology (Hebrew: ‎; commonly abbreviated as Technion IIT) is a university in Haifa, Israel, founded 1924. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Kyoto Prize (京都賞) has been awarded annually since 1984 by the Inamori Foundation, founded by Kazuo Inamori (fortune from ceramics). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

Trivia

  • Knuth has a Chinese name 高德納 (pinyin: Gāo Dénà), given to him in 1977 by Frances Yao just before his first visit to China.[1]
  • Knuth's hobbies include music, specifically playing the organ. He has a two-storey-high pipe organ installed in his home. Knuth disclaims any particular talent in the instrument.[6]
  • Knuth has not used electronic mail since 1 January 1990, saying that fifteen years using e-mail was enough for one lifetime. He finds it more efficient to respond to correspondence in "batch mode," such as one day every three months, replying by postal mail.
  • Knuth is married to Jill Knuth, who published a book on liturgy titled Banners without Words, published by Resource Publications in 1986. They have two children.[7]
  • He is a member of Theta Chi fraternity.
  • Knuth uses a combination of Apple Macintosh and Linux machines for his day-to-day work.[8]
  • Knuth uses the Emacs text editor.[9]

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), commonly called Pinyin, is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... A British pillar box The postal system is a system by which written documents typically enclosed in envelopes, and also small packages containing other matter, are delivered to destinations around the world. ... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... Apple Inc. ... The Macintosh 128K, the first Macintosh computer The iMac, a current Mac computer Mac (formerly Macintosh) is a brand name which covers several lines of personal computers designed, developed, and marketed by Apple Inc. ... Linux (IPA pronunciation: ) is a Unix-like computer operating system. ... Emacs is a class of text editors, possessing an extensive set of features, that are popular with computer programmers and other technically proficient computer users. ...

Knuth's humor

Knuth is a famous programmer known for his geek professional humor. This is a list of programmers notable for their contributions to software, either as original author or architect, or for later additions. ... A geek is a person who is fascinated by knowledge and imagination, usually electronic or virtual in nature. ... Professional humor or occupational humor is a kind of humor which pokes fun at the peculiarities of a particular profession. ...

One of Knuth's reward checks
  • He pays a finder's fee of $2.56 for any typos/mistakes discovered in his books, because "256 pennies is one hexadecimal dollar". (His bounty for errata in 3:16 Bible Texts Illuminated, is, however, $3.16). According to an article in MIT's Technology Review, these reward checks are "among computerdom's most prized trophies".[10]
  • Version numbers of his TeX software approach the transcendental number π, that is versions increment in the style 3, 3.1, 3.14 and so on. Version numbers of Metafont approach the number e similarly.
  • He once warned users of his software, "Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not tried it."[1]
  • All appendices in the Computers and Typesetting series have titles that begin with the letter identifying the appendix.
  • TAOCP v3 (Second Edition) has the index entry "Royalties, use of, 407". Page 407 has no explicit mention of royalties, but does contain a diagram of an "organ-pipe arrangement" in Figure 2. Apparently the purchase of the pipe organ in his home was financed by royalties from TAOCP.[11] (In the first edition of the work, the relevant page is 405.)
  • From the Preface of Concrete Mathematics: When DEK taught Concrete Mathematics at Stanford for the first time, he explained the somewhat strange title by saying that it was his attempt to teach a math course that was hard instead of soft. He announced that, contrary to the expectations of some of his colleagues, he was not going to teach the Theory of Aggregates, nor Stone's Embedding Theorem, nor even the Stone-Čech compactification. (Several students from the civil engineering department got up and quietly left the room.)
  • Knuth published his first "scientific" article in a school magazine in 1957 under the title "Potrzebie System of Weights and Measures." In it, he defined the fundamental unit of length as the thickness of MAD magazine #26, and named the fundamental unit of force "whatmeworry". MAD magazine bought the article and published it in the #33 June 1957 issue.
  • Knuth's first "mathematical" article was a short paper submitted to a "science talent search" contest for high-school seniors in 1955, and published in 1960, in which he discussed number systems where the radix was negative. He further generalized this to number systems where the radix was a complex number. In particular, he defined the quater-imaginary number system, which uses the imaginary number 2i as the base, having the unusual feature that every complex number can be represented with the digits 0, 1, 2, and 3, without a sign.
  • Knuth's article about computational complexity of songs was reprinted twice in computer science journals.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x408, 272 KB) Summary Derived from Image:Knuth-check. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x408, 272 KB) Summary Derived from Image:Knuth-check. ... One of Donald Knuths reward checks In the preface of each of his books and on his website[1], computer scientist Donald Knuth offers to cheerfully pay a reward of $2. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private, coeducational research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... TeX (IPA: as in Greek, often in English; written with a lowercase e in imitation of the logo) is a typesetting system created by Donald Knuth. ... In mathematics, a transcendental number is any complex number that is not algebraic, that is, not the solution of a non-zero polynomial equation with integer (or, equivalently, rational) coefficients. ... When a circles diameter is 1, its circumference is Ï€. The mathematical constant Ï€ is an irrational real number, approximately equal to 3. ... METAFONT is a programming language used to define vector fonts. ... e is the unique number such that the value of the derivative (slope of a tangent line) of f (x) = ex (blue curve) at the point x = 0 is exactly 1. ... Computers and Typesetting is a 5-volume set of books by Donald Knuth describing the TeX and Metafont systems for Digital typography. ... Concrete Mathematics by Ronald L. Graham, Donald E. Knuth and Oren Patashnik is a textbook that provides its readers with mathematical background that can be especially useful in computer science. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Potrzebie is a seemingly nonsensical word (actually Polish), popularized by its use as a running gag in the early issues of Mad not long after the comic book began in 1952. ... A set of fundamental units is a set of units for physical quantities from which every other unit can be generated. ... Look up length, width, breadth in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... In physics, force is an influence that may cause an object to accelerate. ... The radix (Latin for root), also called base, is the number of various unique symbols (or digits or numerals) a positional numeral system uses to represent numbers. ... The quater-imaginary numeral system was first proposed by Donald Knuth in 1955, in a submission to a high-school science talent search. ... The Complexity of Songs was an article published by Donald Knuth, an example of an in-joke in computer science, namely, in computational complexity theory. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ...

Works

A short list of his works[12]:

  1. Volume 1: Fundamental Algorithms (3rd edition), 1997. Addison-Wesley Professional, ISBN 0-201-89683-4
  2. Volume 2: Seminumerical Algorithms (3rd Edition), 1997. Addison-Wesley Professional, ISBN 0-201-89684-2
  3. Volume 3: Sorting and Searching (2nd Edition), 1998. Addison-Wesley Professional, ISBN 0-201-89685-0
  4. Volume 4: Combinatorial Algorithms, in preparation
  5. Volume 5: Syntactic Algorithms, in preparation, estimated to be ready in 2015 [13]
The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 4 fascicle 4
  • Donald E. Knuth, The Art of Computer Programming, fascicles:
  1. Volume 1, Fascicle 1: MMIX — A RISC Computer for the New Millennium, 2005. ISBN 0-201-85392-2
  2. Volume 4, Fascicle 2: Generating All Tuples and Permutations, 2005. ISBN 0-201-85393-0
  3. Volume 4, Fascicle 3: Generating All Combinations and Partitions, 2005. ISBN 0-201-85394-9
  4. Volume 4, Fascicle 4: Generating All Trees -- History of Combinatorial Generation, 2006. ISBN 0-321-33570-8
  • Donald E. Knuth, The TeXbook (Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley), 1984. ISBN 0-201-13448-9
  • Donald E. Knuth, The METAFONTbook (Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley), 1986. ISBN 0-201-13444-6
  • Ronald L. Graham, Donald E. Knuth, Oren Patashnik, Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science, 2nd edition (Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley), 1994. ISBN 0-201-55802-5
  • Selected papers series:[14]
  1. Donald E. Knuth, Literate Programming (Center for the Study of Language and Information - Lecture Notes), 1992. ISBN 0-937073-80-6
  2. Donald E. Knuth, Selected Papers on Computer Science (Stanford, California: Center for the Study of Language and Information - CSLI Lecture Notes, no. 59), 1996. ISBN 1-881526-91-7
  3. Donald E. Knuth, Digital Typography (Stanford, California: Center for the Study of Language and Information - CSLI Lecture Notes, no. 78), 1999. ISBN 1-57586-010-4
  4. Donald E. Knuth, Selected Papers on Analysis of Algorithms (Stanford, California: Center for the Study of Language and Information - CSLI Lecture Notes, no. 102), 2000. ISBN 1-57586-212-3
  5. Donald E. Knuth, Selected Papers on Computer Languages (Stanford, California: Center for the Study of Language and Information - CSLI Lecture Notes, no. 139), 2003. ISBN 1-57586-381-2 (cloth), ISBN 1-57586-382-0 (paperback)
  6. Donald E. Knuth, Selected Papers on Discrete Mathematics (Stanford, California: Center for the Study of Language and Information - CSLI Lecture Notes, no. 106), 2003. ISBN 1-57586-249-2 (cloth), ISBN 1-57586-248-4 (paperback)
  7. Donald E. Knuth, Selected Papers on Design of Algorithms (publication planned after Vol 4 Fasc 1)
  8. Donald E. Knuth, Selected Papers on Fun and Games (publication planned after Vol 4 Fasc 1)
  • Donald E. Knuth, 3:16 Bible Texts Illuminated (Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions), 1990. ISBN 0-89579-252-4
  • Donald E. Knuth, Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About (Center for the Study of Language and Information - CSLI Lecture Notes no 136), 2001. ISBN 1-57586-326-X

Cover of books The Art of Computer Programming[1] is a comprehensive monograph written by Donald Knuth which covers many kinds of programming algorithms and their analysis. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... MMIX is a 64-bit RISC virtual machine designed by Donald Knuth, with significant contributions by John Hennessy (who designed the MIPS chip) and Dick Sites (who was the architect of the Alpha chip). ... Ronald L. Graham (born October 31, 1935) is a mathematician credited by the American Mathematical Society with being one of the principle architects of the rapid development worldwide of discrete mathematics in recent years[1]. He has done important work in scheduling theory, computational geometry, Ramsey theory, and quasi-randomness. ... Oren Patashnik (born 1954) is a computer scientist. ...

Interviews and lectures

is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: , Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Heldhaftig, Vastberaden, Barmhartig (Valiant, Determined, Compassionate) Location of Amsterdam Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province North Holland Government  - Mayor Job Cohen (PvdA)  - Aldermen Lodewijk Asscher Hennah Buyne Carolien Gehrels Tjeerd Herrema Maarten van Poelgeest Marijke Vos  - Secretary Erik Gerritsen Area [1][2]  - City 219 km²  (84. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The front cover of the April 1981 issue of BYTE (Vol 6. ... Amazon. ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Governor Deval Patrick (D) Area  - City  89. ... The Association for Computing Machinery, or ACM, was founded in 1947 as the worlds first scientific and educational computing society. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Salon. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c "Frequently Asked Questions" at Stanford site. Gives the pronunciation of his name as "Ka-NOOTH".
  2. ^ http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth/faq.html#asian.
  3. ^ http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth/.
  4. ^ http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~uno/taocp.html.
  5. ^ See, for example, the Wikipedia category Category:Donald Knuth.
  6. ^ "Pipe Organ" at Stanford site.
  7. ^ Early picture.
  8. ^ See his custom keyboard layouts for Apple Mac OS X (from April 2005) and his FVWM window manager configuration files (from January 2004) as listed on Knuth's programs page.
  9. ^ 1993 interview. “"I use the Emacs editor very heavily..."”
  10. ^ "Rewriting the Bible in 0's and 1's" in the Technology Review of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  11. ^ "Pipe Organ" at Stanford site
  12. ^ A complete list is also available: "Books" at Stanford site
  13. ^ http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~uno/taocp.html
  14. ^ "Selected Papers" at Stanford site

Apple Inc. ... Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... FVWM with internationalization features and some additional modules. ... Technology Review is an innovation and technology magazine affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private, coeducational research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...

See also

Wikisource has original text related to this article: Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithm The Knuth-Morris-Pratt string searching algorithm searches for occurrences of a pattern string within a main string by employing the simple observation that when a mismatch occurs, the pattern itself embodies sufficient information to determine where the... The term shuffle can also refer to the act of dragging ones feet on the ground while walking, running, or dancing. ... In mathematics, Knuths up-arrow notation is a notation for very large integers introduced by Donald Knuth in 1976. ... In mathematical analysis, and in particular in the analysis of algorithms, to classify the growth of functions one has recourse to asymptotic notations. ... The Knuth-Bendix completion algorithm is an algorithm for transforming a set of equations (over terms) into a confluent term rewriting system. ... The man or boy test was proposed by computer scientist Donald Knuth as a means of evaluating implementations of the ALGOL 60 programming language. ... The Trabb Pardo-Knuth algorithm is a program introduced by Donald Knuth and Luis Trabb Pardo to illustrate the evolution of computer programming languages. ... In computer science, Dancing Links, commonly known as DLX, is the technique suggested by Donald Knuth to efficiently implement his Algorithm X. Algorithm X is a recursive, nondeterministic, depth-first, brute-force algorithm that finds all solutions to the exact cover problem. ... Donald Knuth adapted the familiar naming schemes to handle much larger numbers, dodging ambiguity by changing the -illion to -yllion. ... The Complexity of Songs was an article published by Donald Knuth, an example of an in-joke in computer science, namely, in computational complexity theory. ... The Knuth Prize is a prize for outstanding contributions to the foundations of computer science, named after Donald E. Knuth. ... One of Donald Knuths reward checks In the preface of each of his books and on his website[1], computer scientist Donald Knuth offers to cheerfully pay a reward of $2. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • The Stanford home page of Donald Knuth
  • Donald Knuth at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  • O'Connor, John J; Edmund F. Robertson "Donald Knuth". MacTutor History of Mathematics archive.  
  • Video of Donald Knuth at the Peoples Archive
  • Donald Knuth: Leonard Euler of Computer Science (Softpanorama)
  • Videos of presentations w/ Donald Knuth
  • The Potrzebie System of Weights and Measures
  • Article about Knuth on www.stanfordalumni.org
  • Finite Semifields and Projective Planes - Donald Knuth's Ph.D. dissertation
  • Letter sent in February 1994 by Donald Knuth to the Patent and Trademark Office
  • Donald E. Knuth, "Algorithmic Themes", in AMS History of Mathematics, Volume 1: A Century of Mathematics in America, AMS, Providence, RI, 1988.
Persondata
NAME Knuth, Donald Ervin
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Computer science
DATE OF BIRTH 10 January 1938
PLACE OF BIRTH Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Donald Knuth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1595 words)
Knuth is best known as the author of the multi-volume The Art of Computer Programming, one of the most highly respected references in the computer science field.
Knuth published his first "scientific" article in a school magazine in 1957 under the title "Potrzebie System of Weights and Measures." In it, he defined the fundamental unit of length as the thickness of MAD magazine #26, and named the fundamental unit of force "whatmeworry".
Knuth's first "mathematical" article was a short paper submitted to a "science talent search" contest for high-school seniors in 1955, and published in 1960, in which he discussed number systems where the radix was negative.
Donald Knuth - definition of Donald Knuth in Encyclopedia (660 words)
Donald Ervin Knuth (born January 10, 1938) is a renowned computer scientist and Professor Emeritus at Stanford University.
Knuth (pronounced "Ka-NOOTH" [1] (http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth/faq.html)) is best known as the author of the multi-volume The Art of Computer Programming, one of the most highly respected references in the computer science field.
As of 2004, three volumes have been published, and Knuth is currently working on volume four, excerpts of which are released periodically on his website.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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