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Encyclopedia > Donald Henderson

Donald "D.A." Ainslie Henderson, MD, is an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University who was vital in the international effort during the 1960s to eradicate smallpox. Epidemiology (Greek epi = upon, among; demos = people, district; logos = word, discourse), defined literally, is the study of epidemics in humans. ... The Johns Hopkins University is an internationally prestigious private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a highly contagious disease unique to humans. ...

Contents

Professional History

Dr. Henderson was instrumental, in 1974, in initiating the World Health Organization's (WHO) global program of immunization, which has vaccinated 80 percent of the world's children against six major diseases and is striving to eradicate poliomyelitis. For other meanings of the acronym WHO, see WHO (disambiguation) WHO flag Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization (WHO) is an agency of the United Nations, acting as a coordinating authority on international public health. ... Immunization (AmE) or Immunisation (BE) has a number of meanings: In medicine immunization is the process by which an individual is exposed to a material that is designed to prime his or her immune system against that material. ... Poliomyelitis (polio) is a viral paralytic disease. ...


From 1977 through August 1990, Dr. Henderson was dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. He came to Hopkins after directing WHO's ambitious global smallpox eradication campaign (1966-1977). Dean is a title given to some institutions senior or supervisory staff. ... Johns Hopkins (May 19, 1795 - December 24, 1873) was a Baltimore businessman, a Quaker, an abolitionist, and a philanthropist. ...


He rejoined the Hopkins faculty in June 1995 after five years of federal government service. His government service was first as associate director, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President (1991-1993), and later as deputy assistant secretary and senior science advisor in the Department of Health and Human Services (HSS). He is also currently a senior advisor to the federal government and the HHS on civilian biodefense issues. In October 2001, Tommy G. Thompson, Secretary of Health and Human Services, named Dr. Henderson chair of a new national advisory council on public health preparedness which is charged with improving the nation’s public health infrastructure to better counter bioterrorist attacks. President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ... Biodefense refers to short term, local, usually military measures to restore biosecurity to a given group of persons in a given area — in the civilian terminology, it is a very robust biohazard response. ... Bioterrorism is terrorism using germ warfare, an intentional human release of a naturally_occurring or human_modified toxin or biological agent. ...


Dr. Henderson is a Johns Hopkins University Distinguished Service Professor and dean emeritus of the school, with appointments in the departments of Epidemiology and International Health. As HHS's principal science advisor for public health preparedness and chairman of the Secretary's Council on Public Health Preparedness, Dr. Henderson is in charge of coordinating department-wide response to public health emergencies. He was also the founding director in 1998 of the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies, which he has directed for the past four years, and has numerous publications to his credit. [1] (http://commprojects.jhsph.edu/faculty/detail.cfm?id=122&Lastname=Henderson&Firstname=Donald) The Donald A. Henderson Collection at John Hopkins spans his entire career there, including newspaper articles, honors, biographical material, lecture notes, speeches, and correspondence as well as awards such as the Japan Prize and the Public Welfare Medal. Presently, he is a Professor and Resident Scholar at the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, which has created a professorship honoring him as of September 26, 2004. Epidemiology (Greek epi = upon, among; demos = people, district; logos = word, discourse), defined literally, is the study of epidemics in humans. ...


Honors and Awards

  • 1986 - The National Medal of Science in Biology, presented by the President of the United States.
  • 1988 - The Japan Prize, shared with two colleagues.
  • 2000 - He was elected an Honorary Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, one of just 12 Honorary Fellows among the Academy's 2,500 members.
  • 2002 - The Presidental Medal of Freedom from HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson for a lifetime of work in the service of his country and humanity.
  • The Public Welfare Medal, the National Academy of Sciences' highest award.
  • The Edward Jenner Medal, received from the Royal Society of Medicine.
  • A total of 16 universities have conferred honorary degrees and 14 countries have honored him with awards and decorations, as well as WHO and the Pan American Health Organization.

1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Japan Prize is awarded to people from all parts of the world whose original and outstanding achievements in science and technology are recognized as having advanced the frontiers of knowledge and served the cause of peace and prosperity for mankind. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in the United States is a government-established corporation supporting scientific research. ... The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) is an international public health agency with 100 years of experience in working to improve health and living standards of the countries of the Americas. ...

Personal History

Dr. Henderson is a native of Lakewood, Ohio, born September 7th, 1928. He received his A.B. in 1950 from Oberlin College and his M.D. in 1954 from the University of Rochester School of Medicine. He served both an internship (1954-1955) and a residency (1957-1959) in medicine at the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital in Cooperstown, New York. Between his internship and residency he worked in the epidemiology intelligence service of the Communicable Disease Center (CDC). Lakewood is the name of some places around the world, most of them in the United States of America: Lakewood, California Lakewood, Colorado Lakewood, Illinois Lakewood, New Jersey Lakewood, New York Lakewood, Ohio Lakewood, South Carolina Lakewood, Tennessee Lakewood, Washington Lakewood, Wisconsin Lakewood Township, Minnesota Lakewood, Zamboanga del Sur, Philippines... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... 7 (seven) is the natural number following 6 and preceding 8. ... 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Students passing through the Oberlin Memorial Arch in front of Peters Hall on the Oberlin College campus Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio. ... For a list of other places, see Cooperstown (disambiguation). ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta is recognized as the lead United States agency for protecting the public health and safety of people by providing credible information to enhance health decisions, and promoting health through strong partnerships with state health departments and other organizations. ...


External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Donald Henderson (738 words)
Donald Ainslie Henderson, known as D.A. Henderson, (born September 7, 1928) is an American physician and epidemiologist, whose work was vital in the international effort during the 1960s to eradicate smallpox.
From 1977 through August 1990, Henderson was dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.
The Donald A. Henderson Collection at Johns Hopkins spans his entire career there, including newspaper articles, honors, biographical material, lecture notes, speeches, and correspondence as well as awards such as the Japan Prize and the Public Welfare Medal.
Dr. Donald Henderson, 2/24/04 (231 words)
Henderson is Professor of Public Health and Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh and Resident Fellow of the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.
Henderson’s previous positions include: Associate Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President (1990-93); Dean of the Faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health (1977-90); and Director of the World Health Organization’s global smallpox eradication campaign (1966-77).
Henderson, a Lakewood, Ohio native, graduated from Oberlin College, from the University of Rochester School of Medicine, and the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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