FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Donald Coggan
Frederick Donald Coggan

Archbishop of Canterbury

Enthroned 1974
Ended 1980
Predecessor Michael Ramsey
Successor Robert Runcie
Born 23 December 1909
Highgate, London, England
Died 17 May 2000
Buried Canterbury Cathedral
Anglicanism Portal

Frederick Donald Coggan, Baron Coggan PC (23 December 190917 May 2000) was the 101st Archbishop of Canterbury from 1974 to 1980, during which time he visited Rome and met the Pontiff, in company with Bishop Cormac Murphy-O'Connor, future Cardinal of England and Wales. Arthur Michael Ramsey, Baron Ramsey of Canterbury PC (14 Nov 1904 – 23 April 1988) was the one hundredth Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Robert Alexander Kennedy Runcie, Baron Runcie of Cuddesdon PC MC (October 2, 1921 – July 11, 2000) was the 102nd Archbishop of Canterbury from 1980 to 1991. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... View of Highgate, John Constable, 1st quarter of 19th century. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ... Photograph by Keith Edkins File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Pontiff is a title of certain religious leaders, now used principally to refer to the Mercinary of the New Church. ... Cormac Cardinal Murphy-OConnor (born 24 August 1932 in Reading, Berkshire) is a priest of the Roman Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ...


Background

Born in Highgate, London, England, and educated at Merchant Taylors' School, Northwood and St. John's College, Cambridge. He studied Oriental Languages from 1928 to 1931 and took a first in both parts of the tripos, achieving a rare and distinguished double first. Coggan then took up a post as a lecturer in Semitic languages at the University of Manchester from 1931 to 1934, a professor of the New Testament at Wycliffe College in Toronto from 1937 to 1944, and principal of London College of Divinity from 1944 to 1956. View of Highgate, John Constable, 1st quarter of 19th century. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For MTS Crosby, see Merchant Taylors School, Crosby. ... Full name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto - Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist, Cambridge, named after John the Evangelist Previous names - Established 1511 Sister College Balliol College Master Prof. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Affiliations: Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Association of Commonwealth Universities Website: http://www. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... Wycliffe College is an Anglican Church of Canada seminary at the University of Toronto. ...


Life and work

He was ordained a priest in 1935, appointed Bishop of Bradford in 1956 and translated to Archbishop of York in 1965. After his retirement as Archbishop of Canterbury he was granted a life peerage and made Baron Coggan, of Canterbury and Sissinghurst in the County of Kent. This article is about religious workers. ... The Bishop of Bradford is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Bradford, in the Province of York The diocese covers the extreme west of Yorkshire, and has its see in the City of Bradford where the seat is located at the Cathedral Church of Saint Peter. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... The gardens at Sissinghurst Castle in the Weald of Kent, near Cranbrook, Goudhurst and Tenterden, are owned and maintained by the National Trust. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ...


His tenure as archbishop is noted for his strong support for the ordination of women (which did not happen in the Church of England until 1994), having proposed it at the Lambeth Conference of the world's Anglican churches in 1970. His comparatively brief tenure was marked by his boldness, orderliness and punctuality. Aside from his duties of his primacy, he was a prolific writer - his works including Call To The Nation (1975). He was also a speaker and preacher, often accompanied by his wife, Jean Braithwaite. In general religious use, ordination is the process by which one is consecrated (set apart for the undivided administration of various religious rites). ... The Lambeth Conferences was the name given to the periodical assemblies of bishops of the Anglican Communion (Pan-Anglican synods), which since 1867 have met at Lambeth Palace, the London residence of the archbishop of Canterbury. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...


Among his other roles was being Honorary President of the United Bible Societies from 1957 to 1976. His excellent knowledge of the scriptures meant he made an enormous contribution to the furthering of the organisation. He also founded the Lord Coggan Memorial Fund which helped to supply Russian children with copies of the Bible. A Bible society is a non-profit organization (usually ecumenical Protestant in makeup) devoted to translating, publishing and distributing the Bible for free or at subsidized low cost. ...


Known for his warm welcome, he is commonly credited with remarking that "The art of hospitality is to make guests feel at home when you wish they were." (as quoted in 'A Gentleman Publisher's Commonplace Book' John Murray, Oct 1996)


Lord Coggan died at the age of 90. He was cremated and his ashes buried at Canterbury Cathedral. Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ...

Church of England titles
Preceded by
Alfred Blunt
Bishop of Bradford
1956 – 1961
Succeeded by
Clement Parker
Preceded by
Michael Ramsey
Archbishop of York
(Primate of England)

1961 – 1974
Succeeded by
Stuart Blanch
Archbishop of Canterbury
1974 – 1980
Succeeded by
Robert Runcie

  Results from FactBites:
 
Donald Coggan - definition of Donald Coggan in Encyclopedia (292 words)
Frederick Donald Coggan, Baron Coggan (1909 - May 17, 2000) was the 101st Archbishop of Canterbury from 1974 to 1980.
Born in Highgate, London, England, Coggan was a lecturer in Semitic languages at Manchester University from 1931 to 1934, a professor of the New Testament at Wycliffe College in Toronto from 1937 to 1944, and principal of London College of Divinity from 1944 to 1956.
After his retirement as Archbishop of Canterbury he was elevated to the House of Lords, as Baron Coggan, of Canterbury and Sissinghurst in the County of Kent.
Guardian | Lord Coggan of Canterbury (1306 words)
Coggan, whose dedication was equally transparent, was the scholarly theologian with a tape recorder handy for prompt dictation, and a meticulousness equal to that of any company director.
Donald Coggan was born in Highgate, north London, educated at Merchant Taylors' school, Northwood, Middlesex, and St John's College, Cambridge, and was in his mid-teens when the call to be ordained came to him.
Coggan always maintained that he learned much, both of life itself and of the meaning of ministry, during his three years amid the poverty, unemployment and inadequate housing of that part of inner north London in those prewar days.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m