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Encyclopedia > Don Young
Don Young


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from
Alaska's At-large district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
March 6, 1973
Preceded by Nick Begich
Succeeded by Incumbent

Born June 9, 1933
Meridian, California
Political party Republican
Spouse Lu Young
Religion Episcopalian

Donald Edwin (Don) Young (born June 9, 1933) has been the sole congressman from Alaska in the United States House of Representatives since 1973. He is a Republican. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2301x2961, 711 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Don Young Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is the lower of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The entire state of Alaska is fully within one Congressional district, giving it the largest area and least population density of any district in the nation. ... // In politics The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Nicholas Joseph Begich (April 6, 1932 - October 16, 1972) was a Democratic Party member of the United States House of Representatives. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      For other uses, see Republican Party (disambiguation) or GOP (disambiguation). ... The word Episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word however is used in religious terms to mean bishop. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,855 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is the lower of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      For other uses, see Republican Party (disambiguation) or GOP (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life

Young was born in Meridian, California. He earned an associate's degree in education from Yuba Junior College in 1952 and a bachelor's degree from Chico State College (now California State University, Chico) in 1958. He served in the Army from 1955 to 1957.[1] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An Associate Degree is an academic degree awarded by community colleges, junior colleges and some bachelors degree-granting colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study usually lasting two years. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A bachelors degree (Artium Baccalaureus, A.B. or B.A.) is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... California State University, Chico is the second-oldest campus in the California State University system, and home to the Chico University Arboretum. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the United States armed forces and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Young moved to Alaska in 1959, not long after it became a state. He eventually settled in Fort Yukon, a 700-person city on the Yukon River, seven miles above the Arctic Circle in Alaska’s central interior region. He made a living in construction, fishing, trapping and gold mining. He captained a tugboat and ran a barge operation to deliver products and supplies to villages along the Yukon River. He still holds his mariner's license today. During the winter, he taught fifth grade at the local Bureau of Indian Affairs elementary school. Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fort Yukon is a city located in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska. ... Map of the Yukon River watershed The Yukon River is a major watercourse of northwestern North America. ... World map showing the Arctic Circle in red A sign along the Dalton Highway marking the location of the Arctic Circle The Arctic Circle is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth. ... The Le Four manoeuvering in Brest harbour A tugboat, or tug, is a boat used to manoeuvre, primarily by towing or pushing other vessels (see shipping) in harbours, over the open sea or through rivers and canals. ... This article is about naval crewpeople; for other meanings, see sailor (disambiguation). ... The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is an agency of the federal government of the United States within the Department of the Interior charged with the administration and management of 55. ...


Young began his political career in 1964 when he was elected mayor of Fort Yukon. After only one term, he was elected to the Alaska House of Representatives and served two terms before being elected to the Alaska Senate in 1970. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Alaska House of Representatives is the lower house in the Alaska Legislature of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... The Alaska Senate in session. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...


Young is married to the former Lula Fredson. They have two daughters. The Youngs are Episcopalians. The Episcopal Church may refer to several members of the Anglican Communion, including: Episcopal Church in the United States of America Scottish Episcopal Church Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East Episcopal Church of Cuba idk of the Sudan Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church ...


In Congress

Alaska's at-large congressman, Democrat Nick Begich, disappeared in a plane crash on October 16, 1972. He was reelected to the House that November, but was declared dead on December 29. Young, who had been the Republican candidate against Begich in November, ran in the special election in March 1973 and won, just barely defeating Democrat Emil Notti. He won a full term in 1974 in another relative squeaker, largely due to his role in fighting for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. However, he didn't face another serious opponent until 1990. That year, John Devens, the mayor of Valdez, nearly defeated him because of dissatisfaction with Young's role in the investigation of the Exxon Valdez spill. Devens ran another close race against Young in 1992, but Young was reelected in 1994 with 57 percent of the vote and had not faced serious opposition until the 2006 election year, with Democratic challenger Diane Benson. He was reelected to his 16th full term in 2004 with 72%, the most votes ever for a single candidate in a statewide election in Alaska. In 2006 He won re-election for his House seat against Diane Benson (D) 56%-42%. Though he was never expected to lose the election, his much smaller margin of victory compared to the 2004 election is notable. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Nicholas Joseph Begich (April 6, 1932 - October 16, 1972) was a Democratic Party member of the United States House of Representatives. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Map of the pipeline The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), usually called the Alyeska Pipeline in Alaska or the Alaska Pipeline elsewhere is a major U.S. oil pipeline connecting oil fields in northern Alaska to a sea port where the oil can be shipped to the Lower 48 states... ... Valdez (IPA: ) is a city in Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... This article is about the tank vessel Exxon Valdez. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Young is the 8th-longest serving House member, and the 3rd most senior Republican (ranked only by Bill Young of Florida and Ralph Regula of Ohio). Due to his long tenure in the House and that of Senator Ted Stevens, Alaska is considered to have clout in national politics far beyond its small population (it has long been one of the smallest states in population and is currently 47th, ahead of only North Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming). He is often called "Alaska's third senator." Charles William Bill Young, also known as C.W. Bill Young, (born December 16, 1930), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1971, representing the 10th District of Florida (map). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ralph Straus Regula (born December 3, 1924) is a Representative in the United States Congress from the 16th District of the State of Ohio (map), elected to his 17th term in November 2004. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Theodore Fulton Ted Stevens (born November 18, 1923) is a United States Senator from Alaska. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None[1] Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ...


Young's voting record is relatively moderate by Republican standards. However, he vigorously opposes federal control of Alaska's land and resources. He is also a strong proponent of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling. In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who holds an intermediate position between two extreme or radical viewpoints. ... The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) covers 19,049,236 acres (79,318 km²) in northeastern Alaska, in the North Slope region. ...


Young chaired the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee from 2001 to 2006. He also chaired the Resources Committee from the 1995 Republican takeover of the House until 2001 and strongly supported legislation, known as the "Young Bill" to move the United States territory of Puerto Rico to choose statehood or independence as its ultimate political status. He currently serves as the Republican minority's Ranking Member on the Resources Committee. The U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure has jurisdiction over: Aviation Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Railroads Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Highways, Transit, and Pipelines Water Resources and Environment A subcommittee represents each area of jurisdiction. ... // Jurisdiction Fisheries and wildlife, including research, restoration, refuges, and conservation. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


According to The New Republic, Young is "well-known for his sharp elbows and generous appetite for legislative pork."[1] His reputation for steering federal dollars to Alaska is almost as legendary as that of Stevens. For example, in the 2005 Highway Bill, Young helped secure "$941 million for 119 special projects," including a $231 million bridge in Anchorage which a rider in the bill would name for Young himself[2]. For other uses, see the disambiguation section. ... Pork barrel, in a literal sense, is a barrel in which pork is kept, but figuratively is a supply of money; often the source of ones livelihood. ... The Transportation Equity Act of 2005 (known by its full title as the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users or SAFETEA-LU) is a piece of United States legislation that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on August 10, 2005. ...


Recent controversies

The "Bridge to Nowhere"

In 2005, Young and Stevens earmarked $223 million for building an enormous bridge from Ketchikan to Gravina Island (pop. 50), which also contains Ketchikan's airport. The bridge would be used for access by emergency vehicles, as well as passengers. Currently there is a small car and passenger ferry that travels the 1/4 mile crossing in 3 to 7 minutes and runs every half hour. Critics assailed this as pork barrel spending at taxpayers' expense and dubbed it the "Bridge to Nowhere". After criticism from citizens and others in Congress, lawmakers defunded the bridge specifically, and instead funneled the money to the State of Alaska, Department of Transportation, allowing Alaska's Governor to start road construction after the Alaska Legislature funded the project with the directed monies.[3] 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gravina Island Bridge is a proposed $315 million bridge to replace the ferry that currently connects Ketchikan, Alaska (population 8,000) to developable land on Gravina Island and improve access to Ketchikan International Airport. ... Ketchikan is a city located in Ketchikan Gateway Borough, Alaska. ... Map showing location of Gravina Island Gravina Island is an island in the Gravina Islands of the Alexander Archipelago in southeastern Alaska, at . ...


Abramoff scandal

Published reports have linked Young to the Jack Abramoff Indian lobbying scandal, although no wrongdoing has been alleged[4]. In September 2002 Young and fellow Republican Steve LaTourette of Ohio wrote to the General Services Administration urging the agency to give preferential treatment to groups such as Indian tribes when evaluating development proposals.[5] In particular, the letter referred to a historic building, the Old Post Office Pavilion in downtown Washington, DC.[6] This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Steven C. LaTourette (born July 22, 1954) is an American politician from Ohio. ... The General Services Administration (GSA) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1949 to help manage and support the basic functioning of federal agencies. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


Cape Wind

According to an editorial in the Boston Globe on February 26, 2006 [7], Young sponsored a proposal to the fiscal 2006 Coast Guard authorization bill that would have banned offshore wind turbines within 1.5 nautical miles of navigation channels, a measure opposed by the Coast Guard, and, according to the Globe, intended to block the Cape Wind energy farm off Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The measure, now in conference committee, has been drawn more narrowly so that it would only apply to Cape Wind, as well as stating that the Coast Guard or governor may quash the project if they find it to be unsafe or otherwise unsuitable. The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States armed forces involved in maritime law enforcement, mariner assistance, search and rescue, and national defense, among other duties of coast guards elsewhere. ... Wind turbine in Luxembourg Horizontal axis wind turbine, the Enercon model E-66 wind energy converter, in Germany. ... Offshore wind farm near Copenhagen, Denmark. ... Cape Cod Cape Cod (1033 km²) is an arm-shaped peninsula forming the easternmost portion of the state of Massachusetts, in the northeastern United States. ...


Quotes

  • "Environmentalists are a self-centered bunch of waffle-stomping, Harvard-graduating, intellectual idiots" who "are not Americans, never have been Americans, never will be Americans."[8]
  • "If you can't eat it, can't sleep under it, can't wear it or make something from it, it's not worth anything."[9]

Committees and caucus

Preceded by
Nick Begich
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Alaska's At-large congressional district

1973 – present
Incumbent

Members of the Committee on Financial Services sit in the tiers of raised chairs (R), while those testifying and audience members sit below (L). ... The U.S. House Committee on Resources, or Resources Committee (often referred to as simply Resources, as in Hes on Resources) is a Congressional committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure has jurisdiction over: Aviation Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Railroads Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Highways, Transit, and Pipelines Water Resources and Environment A subcommittee represents each area of jurisdiction. ... Nicholas Joseph Begich (April 6, 1932 - October 16, 1972) was a Democratic Party member of the United States House of Representatives. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Alaska to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... The entire state of Alaska is fully within one Congressional district, giving it the largest area and least population density of any district in the nation. ...

External links

  • Official website
  • Quotes by Don Young
  • Voting record maintained by the Washington Post
  • Don Young caught lying about debate over emissions bill

References

  1. ^ Veterans in the US House of Representatives 109th Congress (PDF). Navy League. Retrieved on 2006-12-09.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Don Young - Free net encyclopedia (748 words)
Young began his political career in 1964 when he was elected mayor of Fort Yukon.
Young is the 8th-longest serving House member, and the 3rd most senior Republican (ranked only by Bill Young of Florida and Ralph Regula of Ohio).
According to The New Republic, Young is "well-known for his sharp elbows and generous appetite for legislative pork."[1] His reputation for steering federal dollars to Alaska is almost as legendary as that of Stevens.
Don Young - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (981 words)
Young is married to the former Lula Fredson.
Young is the 8th-longest serving House member, and the 3rd most senior Republican (ranked only by Bill Young of Florida and Ralph Regula of Ohio).
According to The New Republic, Young is "well-known for his sharp elbows and generous appetite for legislative pork."[1] His reputation for steering federal dollars to Alaska is almost as legendary as that of Stevens.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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