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Encyclopedia > Don Budge
Don Budge hitting a backhand as an amateur in 1935

John Donald ("Don" or "Donnie") Budge (June 13, 1915January 26, 2000) was an American tennis champion who was a World No. 1 player for 5 years, first as an amateur and then as a professional. He is most famous as the first man to win in a single year the four tournaments that compose the Grand Slam of tennis. Budge was considered to have the best backhand in the history of tennis, at least until the emergence of Ken Rosewall in the 1950s and '60s. Image File history File links Don_Budge_Time_Cover. ... Image File history File links Don_Budge_Time_Cover. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arthur Ashe Stadium at Flushing Meadows, New York Tennis is a game played between two players (singles) or between two teams of two players (doubles). ... World number one male tennis player rankings is a year-by-year listing of both the male tennis player who, at the end of a full year of play, has generally been considered to be the best overall player for the entire year, and of the runner-up for that... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... Ken Rosewall and Lew Hoad in a 1952 Davis Cup doubles match Ken Robert Rosewall (born November 2, 1934 in Sydney, Australia) is a former champion tennis player with a renowned backhand who enjoyed an exceptionally long career at the highest levels, from the early 1950s to the early 1970s. ...

Contents

Biography

Born in Oakland, California, Budge was the son of a Scottish immigrant and former soccer player - his father had played several matches for the Rangers reserve team before emigrating to the United States.[1] Growing up, he played a variety of sports before taking up tennis. He was tall and slim and his height helped provide what is still considered one of the most powerful serves of all time. He had a graceful, overpowering backhand that he hit with a slight amount of topspin and that, combined with his quickness and his serve, made him the best player of his time. “Oakland” redirects here. ... This article is about the country. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Rangers Football Club are a football club from Glasgow, Scotland who currently play in the Scottish Premier League. ... The Reserve team is what many european football clubs have as a backup behind their regular first team, its main purpose is to give young talented players a chance to prove themselves without risking them in more high profile matches with the main squad. ... A memorial statue in Hanko, Finland, commemorating the thousands of emigrants who left the country to start a new life in the United States Emigration is the act and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ...



Budge studied at the University of California, Berkeley in late 1933 but left to play tennis with the U.S. Davis Cup auxiliary team. Accustomed to hard-court surfaces in his native California, he had difficulty playing on the grass surfaces in the east. However, a good instructor and hard work changed all that and in 1937 he swept Wimbledon, winning the singles, the men's doubles title with Gene Mako, and the mixed doubles crown with Alice Marble. He then went on to win the U. S. National singles and the mixed doubles with Sarah Palfrey Fabyan. Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The great Australians Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall with the Cup in 1953 The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wimbledon logo The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as simply Wimbledon, is the oldest and arguably most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Constantine „Gene“ Mako (born 24 January 1916 in Budapest) is former American tennis player and art dealer. ... Alice Marble on the cover of LIFE magazine in 1939 Alice Marble (September 13, 1913–December 13, 1990) was an early American tennis champion. ... Sarah Hammond Palfrey Fabyan Cooke Danzig (born September 18, 1912 in Sharon, Massachusetts, USA – died February 27, 1996 in New York) was a female tennis player from the United States. ...


He gained the most fame for his match that year against Gottfried von Cramm in the Davis Cup inter-zone finals against Germany. Trailing 1-4 in the final set, he came back to win 8-6. His victory allowed the United States to advance and to then win the Davis Cup for the first time in 12 years. For his efforts, he was named Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year and he became the first tennis player to ever be voted the James E. Sullivan Award as America's top amateur athlete. Gottfried von Cramm hitting a volley in 1937. ... Associated Press Athlete of the Year In 1931, the first and most prestigious Athlete of the Year award in the United States was initiated by the Associated Press (AP). ... The AAU James E. Sullivan Award is awarded annually by the Amateur Athletic Union to the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States. ...


In 1938 Budge dominated amateur tennis, defeating John Bromwich in the Australian Open final, Roderick Menzel in the French Open, Henry "Bunny" Austin at Wimbledon, where he never lost a set, and Gene Mako in the U.S. Open, to become the first person ever to win the Grand Slam in tennis. Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Bromwich (1918-1999) was an Australian male tennis player. ... The Australian Open is held each January at Melbourne Park. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held over two weeks between mid May and early June in Paris, France, and is the second of the Grand Slam tournaments on the annual tennis calendar. ... Henry Wilfred Bunny Austin (August 26, 1906 – August 26, 2000) was a British tennis player. ... Wimbledon logo The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as simply Wimbledon, is the oldest and arguably most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Constantine „Gene“ Mako (born 24 January 1916 in Budapest) is former American tennis player and art dealer. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments...


Budge turned professional after winning the Grand Slam and thereafter played mostly head-to-head matches. In 1939 he beat the two reigning kings of professional tennis, Ellsworth Vines and Fred Perry, 22 matches to 17 and 28 matches to 8 (seeTennis, male players statistics). That year he also won two great pro tournaments, the French Pro Championship over Vines and the Wembley Pro tournament over Hans Nüsslein. There was no professional tour in 1940 but seven principal tournaments. Budge kept his world crown by winning 4 of these events including the greatest one, the United States Pro Championship. In 1941 Budge played another major tour beating the 48-year-old Bill Tilden, the final outcome probably being 46-7 plus 1 tie. In 1942 Budge won both his last major tour over Bobby Riggs, Frank Kovacs, Perry and Les Stoefen and for a second time the U.S. Pro, crushing Riggs 6-2 6-2 6-2 in the final. He then joined the United States Army Air Force to serve in World War II. At the beginning of 1943 in an obstacle course he tore a muscle in his shoulder. In his book 'A Tennis Memoir' page 144 he said "The tear didn't heal, and the scar tissue that was formed complicated the injury and made it even serious. Nevertheless...I was able to carry on with my military duties...as long as two years afterwards, in the spring of '45, I was given a full month's medical leave so that I could go to Berkeley and have an osteopath, Dr. J. LeRoy Near, work with me." : this permanently hindered his playing abilities. During his wartime duty he played some exhibitions for the troops in particular during the summer 1945 with the war winding down, Budge played in an U.S Army (Budge-Frank Parker) - U.S. Navy (Riggs - Wayne Sabin) competition under the Davis Cup format : the main confrontations were the Budge-Riggs meetings knowing that both Americans were the best players in the world in 1942 just before being enlisted in the U.S. Armed Forces and again when they came back to the professional circuit in 1945. In the first match, on the island of Guam, Budge trounced Riggs 6-2 6-2. On the island of Peleliu Budge won again 6-4 7-5. Riggs won the next two matches against Budge 6-1 6-1 (island of Ulithi) and 6-3 4-6 6-1 (island of Saipan). Budge confided in Parker his disbelief at losing two matches in a row to Riggs. In the fifth and final match on the island of Tinian, scheduled for the first week of August 1945, Riggs defeated Budge 6-8 6-1 8-6. This was the first time Budge had been beaten by Riggs in a series (Riggs also won 3 matches out of 5 against the amateur Parker, both holder and future titlist of the US amateur Nationals at Forest Hills) thereby giving Riggs an important psychological edge in their forthcoming peacetime tours. [2] Ellsworth Vines as an amateur in 1933 Ellsworth Vines (September 28, 1911 – March 17, 1994) was an American tennis champion of the 1930s, the World No. ... Fred Perry hitting a backhand volley Frederick John Perry (May 18, 1909 – February 2, 1995) born in Stockport, Cheshire. ... // Grand Slam tournaments (8 titles) Australian Championships (excluding professionals): 1953, 1955 Australian Open (amateurs and professionals): 1971, 1972 French Championships (excluding professionals): 1953 French Open (amateurs and professionals): 1968 U.S. Championships (excluding professionals): 1956 U.S. Open (amateurs and professionals): 1970 Major professional tournaments before the open era began... // The Three Major Professional Tournaments Professional tennis players in the years before the Open era began in 1968 played mostly on tours in head-to-head competition. ... Hans Nüsslein (March 31, 1910 – June 28, 1991) was a German tennis player of the 1930s who is almost totally forgotten today. ... // The Three Major Professional Tournaments Professional tennis players in the years before the Open era began in 1968 played mostly on tours in head-to-head competition. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bobby Riggs on the cover of Sports Illustrated just before his match with Billie Jean King in 1973 Riggs at Wimbledon in 1939 Robert Larimore (Bobby) Riggs (February 25, 1918 – October 25, 1995) was a 1930s–40s tennis player who was the World No. ... Frank Kovacs (1800 - 1855) was a Hungarian vagrant in Israel; he was known as the Dark Lord of Spain for his court antics that resulted in the Spanish Monarchy dissolving in 1807 at the age of seven. ... Les Stoefen was an American tennis player of the 1930s. ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Frank Andrew Parker (born on January 31, 1916 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA – July 24, 1997) was an American male tennis player. ...


After the war Budge played for a few years, mostly against Riggs. In 1946 Budge lost narrowly to Riggs in their U.S. tour, 24 matches to 22. The hierarchy was confirmed at the U.S. Pro, held at Forest Hills where Riggs easily defeated Budge in the last round. Next year Riggs stayed the pro king by defeating again Budge in the U.S. Pro final in five sets. Riggs then established himself as the World No. 1 for those two years. According to Kramer, "Bobby played to Budge's shoulder, lobbed him to death, won the first twelve matches, thirteen out of the first fourteen, and then hung on to beat Budge, twenty-four matches to twenty-two. At the age of thirty Don Budge was very nearly a has-been. That was the way pro tennis worked then." According to Riggs, however, Budge still had a very powerful, very deadly overhead and that rather than winning outright very many points with his lobbing, he actually achieved two other goals: his constant lobbing led Budge to play somewhat deeper at the net than he would have otherwise, thereby making it easier for Riggs to hit passing shots for winners; and the constant lobbing helped to wear Budge down by forcing him to run back to the backline time after time. [3]. Budge reached two more U.S. Pro finals, losing in 1949 at Forest Hills to Riggs and in 1953 in Cleveland to Pancho Gonzales. The Three Major Professional Tournaments Professional tennis players in the years before the Open era began in 1968 played mostly on tours in head-to-head competition. ... Forest Hills is the name of some places in the United States of America: Forest Hills, Kentucky Forest Hills, Massachusetts (a suburb of Boston) Forest Hills, Michigan (a census-designated place) Forest Hills, Pennsylvania Forest Hills is also the name of a neighborhood in the borough of Queens in New... World number one male tennis player rankings is a year-by-year listing of both the male tennis player who, at the end of a full year of play, has generally been considered to be the best overall player for the entire year, and of the runner-up for that...


In 1954 Budge recorded his last significant victory in a North American tour with Gonzales, Segura, and Sedgman when, in Los Angeles, he defeated Gonzales, by then the best player in the world.


After retiring from competition Budge coached and conducted tennis clinics for children. According to Riggs' 1949 autobiography, as of that writing Budge owned a laundry in New York with Sidney Wood as well as a bar in Oakland. A gentleman on and off the court, he was much in demand for speaking engagements and endorsed various lines of sporting goods. With the advent of the Open era in tennis, in 1968 he returned to play at Wimbledon in the Veteran's doubles. In 1973, at the age of 58, he and former champion Frank Sedgman teamed up to win the Veteran's doubles championship at Wimbledon before an appreciative crowd. Sidney Wood (November 1, 1911) was an American male tennis player. ... The Open Era in tennis began in 1968 when the Grand Slam tournaments, such as Wimbledon, abandoned the long-standing rules of amateurism and allowed professionals to compete. ... Frank Allan Sedgman, born October 29, 1927, in Mt. ...


In December of 1999, Budge was injured in an automobile accident from which he never fully recovered. He died on January 26, 2000 at a nursing home in Scranton, Pennsylvania, aged 84. Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The City of Scranton is the county seat of Lackawanna CountyGR6 in Northeastern Pennsylvania, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 76,415 (2003 estimate: 74,320). ...


Budge was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame at Newport, Rhode Island in 1964. Don Budge received the honour of being mentioned in a musical. He is known as the tennis instructor in Annie. His skill is referred to during the song "I think I'm gonna like it here." The International Tennis Hall of Fame is a non-profit tennis hall of fame and museum at the Newport Casino in Newport, Rhode Island, USA. // The International Tennis Hall of Fame is a non-profit institution dedicated to preserving the history of tennis, inspiring and encouraging junior tennis development, enshrining... Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


Assessment

Budge is a consensus pick for being one of the greatest players of all time, if not the very greatest. E. Digby Baltzell wrote in 1994 that Budge and Laver "have usually been rated at the top of any all-time World Champions list, Budge having a slight edge." [4] Will Grimsley wrote in 1971 that Budge "is considered by many to be foremost among the all-time greats." [5] Paul Metzler, in his analysis of ten of the all-time greats, singles out Budge as the greatest player before World War II, and gives him second place overall behind Jack Kramer.[6] Kramer himself has written that Budge was, in the long run, the greatest player who ever lived although Ellsworth Vines topped him when at the height of his game. .[7] "Budge was the best of all," says Kramer. "He owned the most perfect set of mechanics and he was the most consistent.... Don was so good that when he toured with Sedgman, Gonzales, and Segura in 1954 at the age of thirty-eight, none of those guys could get to the net consistently off his serve—and Sedgman, as quick a man who ever played the game, was in his absolute prime then. Don could keep them pinned to the baseline with his backhand too." In his 1979 autobiography Kramer considered the best player ever to have been either Don Budge (for consistent play) or Ellsworth Vines (at the height of his game). The next four best were, chronologically, Bill Tilden, Fred Perry, Bobby Riggs, and Pancho Gonzales. All of these sources were written after Laver completed his second, and Open, Grand Slam in 1969. Jack Kramer as an amateur in 1947 John Albert Kramer (b. ... Ellsworth Vines as an amateur in 1933 Ellsworth Vines (September 28, 1911 – March 17, 1994) was an American tennis champion of the 1930s, the World No. ... Frank Allan Sedgman, born October 29, 1927, in Mt. ... Ricardo Alonso González or Richard Gonzalez, (May 9, 1928 – July 3, 1995), who was generally known as Pancho Gonzales or, less often, as Pancho Gonzalez, was the World No. ... Pancho Segura hitting his famous two-handed forehand Pancho Segura, born Francisco Olegario Segura (June 20, 1921) was a leading tennis player of the 1940s and 1950s, both as an amateur and as a professional. ... Ellsworth Vines as an amateur in 1933 Ellsworth Vines (September 28, 1911 – March 17, 1994) was an American tennis champion of the 1930s, the World No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fred Perry hitting a backhand volley Frederick John Perry (May 18, 1909 – February 2, 1995) born in Stockport, Cheshire. ... Bobby Riggs on the cover of Sports Illustrated just before his match with Billie Jean King in 1973 Riggs at Wimbledon in 1939 Robert Larimore (Bobby) Riggs (February 25, 1918 – October 25, 1995) was a 1930s–40s tennis player who was the World No. ... Ricardo Alonso González or Richard Gonzalez, (May 9, 1928 – July 3, 1995), who was generally known as Pancho Gonzales or, less often, as Pancho Gonzalez, was the World No. ...


In early 1986 Inside Tennis, a magazine edited in Northern California, devoted parts of four issues to a lengthy article called "Tournament of the Century", an imaginary tournament to determine the greatest of all time. Twenty-five players in all were named by the 37 experts in their lists of the 10 best. The magazine then ranked them in descending order by total number of points assigned. The top eight players in overall points, with their number of first-place votes, were: Rod Laver (9), John McEnroe (3), Don Budge (4), Jack Kramer (5), Björn Borg (6), Pancho Gonzales (1), Bill Tilden (6), and Lew Hoad (1). McEnroe was still an active player and Laver, Borg, and Gonzales had only recently retired. In the imaginary tournament Laver beat McEnroe in the finals in 5 sets. Northern California, sometimes referred to as NorCal, is the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. ...


More recently, an Associated Press poll conducted in 1999 ranked Budge fifth, following Laver, Sampras, Tilden, and Borg. Even more recently, in 2006, a panel of former players and experts was asked by TennisWeek to assemble a draw for a fantasy tournament to determine who was the greatest of all time. The top eight seeds were Federer, Laver, Sampras, Borg, Tilden, Budge, Kramer, and McEnroe. In important polls, then, Budge has consistently been ranked in the top five or six. Perhaps only Tilden and Laver can boast such a high and long-standing critical assessment.


Grand Slam singles finals

Wins (6)

Year Championship Opponent in Final Score in Final
1937 Wimbledon Gottfried von Cramm 6-3, 6-4, 6-2
1937 U.S. Championships Gottfried von Cramm 6-1, 7-9, 6-1, 3-6, 6-1
1938 Australian Championships John Bromwich 6-4, 6-2, 6-1
1938 French Championships Roderik Menzel 6-3, 6-2, 6-4
1938 Wimbledon Championships (2) Bunny Austin 6-1, 6-0, 6-3
1938 U.S. Championships (2) Gene Mako 6-3, 6-8, 6-2, 6-1

Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wimbledon logo The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as simply Wimbledon, is the oldest and arguably most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany_1933. ... Gottfried von Cramm hitting a volley in 1937. ... The United States Open tennis tournament, commonly referred to as the US Open, is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam tennis tournaments. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany_1933. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Australian Open is held each January at Melbourne Park. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... John Bromwich (1918-1999) was an Australian male tennis player. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held over two weeks between mid May and early June in Paris, France, and is the second of the Grand Slam tournaments on the annual tennis calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Czechoslovakia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Henry Wilfred Bunny Austin (August 26, 1906 – August 26, 2000) was a British tennis player. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Constantine „Gene“ Mako (born 24 January 1916 in Budapest) is former American tennis player and art dealer. ...

Runner-ups (1)

Year Championship Opponent in Final Score in Final
1936 U.S. Championships Fred Perry 2-6, 6-2, 8-6, 1-6, 10-8

1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Fred Perry hitting a backhand volley Frederick John Perry (May 18, 1909 – February 2, 1995) born in Stockport, Cheshire. ...

References

  1. ^ Craig, Jim: Scotland's Sporting Curiosities, Birlinn, Edinburgh, 2005
  2. ^ Tennis Is My Racket, by Bobby Riggs, New York, 1949, pages 166-167.
  3. ^ Tennis Is My Racket, by Bobby Riggs, New York, 1949, pages 166-167.
  4. ^ Baltzell, E. Digby: Sporting Gentlemen: Men's Tennis from the Age of Honor to the Cult of the Superstar
  5. ^ Grimsley, Will: Tennis: Its History, People and Events
  6. ^ Metzler, Paul: Tennis Styles and Stylists
  7. ^ In his 1979 autobiography Kramer considered the best player ever to have been either Don Budge (for consistent play) or Ellsworth Vines (at the height of his game). The next four best were, chronologically, Bill Tilden, Fred Perry, Bobby Riggs, and Pancho Gonzales. After these six came the "second echelon" of Rod Laver, Lew Hoad, Ken Rosewall, Gottfried von Cramm, Ted Schroeder, Jack Crawford, Pancho Segura, Frank Sedgman, Tony Trabert, John Newcombe, Arthur Ashe, Stan Smith, Björn Borg, and Jimmy Connors. He felt unable to rank Henri Cochet and René Lacoste accurately but felt they were among the very best.

Jim Craig(b. ... Ellsworth Vines as an amateur in 1933 Ellsworth Vines (September 28, 1911 – March 17, 1994) was an American tennis champion of the 1930s, the World No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fred Perry hitting a backhand volley Frederick John Perry (May 18, 1909 – February 2, 1995) born in Stockport, Cheshire. ... Bobby Riggs on the cover of Sports Illustrated just before his match with Billie Jean King in 1973 Riggs at Wimbledon in 1939 Robert Larimore (Bobby) Riggs (February 25, 1918 – October 25, 1995) was a 1930s–40s tennis player who was the World No. ... Ricardo Alonso González or Richard Gonzalez, (May 9, 1928 – July 3, 1995), who was generally known as Pancho Gonzales or, less often, as Pancho Gonzalez, was the World No. ... For the arena in Melbourne Park used for show matches in the Australian Open, see Rod Laver Arena Rodney George (Rod) Laver MBE (born August 9, 1938, in Rockhampton, Australia) is a former tennis player from Australia who was the World No. ... Lewis Alan Hoad, born November 23, 1934 in Glebe, New South Wales, Australia - died July 3, 1994 in Fuengirola, Spain, was a champion tennis player. ... Ken Rosewall and Lew Hoad in a 1952 Davis Cup doubles match Ken Robert Rosewall (born November 2, 1934 in Sydney, Australia) is a former champion tennis player with a renowned backhand who enjoyed an exceptionally long career at the highest levels, from the early 1950s to the early 1970s. ... Gottfried von Cramm hitting a volley in 1937. ... Fred(e)rick Rudolph Ted Schroeder (born July 20, 1921) was an American male tennis player. ... Jack Crawford John Herbert Crawford, known as Jack Crawford, was a great Australian tennis player of the 1930s. ... Pancho Segura hitting his famous two-handed forehand Pancho Segura, born Francisco Olegario Segura (June 20, 1921) was a leading tennis player of the 1940s and 1950s, both as an amateur and as a professional. ... Frank Allan Sedgman, born October 29, 1927, in Mt. ... Marion Anthony Trabert (born August 16, 1930 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former star tennis player and longtime tennis author, TV commentator, instructor, and motivation speaker. ... John Newcombe. ... Arthur Ashe (1943-1993) Country: United States Height: 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) Weight: 73 kg (160 lb) Plays: Right Turned pro: 1966 Retired: 1980 Highest singles ranking: 1 (1968 and 1975) Singles titles: 34 Career prize money: $2,584,909 Grand Slam Record Titles: 3 Australian Open W... Stan Smith (born December 14, 1946 in Pasadena, California) is a former American tennis player who, with his partner Bob Lutz, was one of the best doubles players of all time. ...   (born June 6, 1956, in Stockholm, Sweden) is a former World No. ... James Scott (Jimmy) Connors (born September 2, 1952 in East St. ... Henri Jean Cochet (December 14, 1901 in Villeurbanne, near Lyon - April 1, 1987) was a champion tennis player, one of the famous Four Musketeers from France who dominated tennis in the late 1920s and early 1930s. ... René Lacoste Jean René Lacoste (July 2, 1904 - October 12, 1996) was a famous French tennis player, businessman, and innovator, nicknamed the crocodile by fans; he is now mostly known as being the namesake of the Lacoste tennis shirt, which he introduced in 1929. ...

Sources

  • Sporting Gentlemen: Men's Tennis from the Age of Honor to the Cult of the Superstar, (1994), E. Digby Baltzell
  • Tennis: Its History, People and Events, (1971), Will Grimsley
  • Tennis Styles and Stylists, (1969), Paul Metzler
  • The Game, My 40 Years in Tennis (1979), Jack Kramer with Frank Deford (ISBN 0-399-12336-9)
  • Tennis Is My Racket, (1949), Bobby Riggs

Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ...

See also

This is a list of top international male tennis players. ...

External links

Preceded by
Jesse Owens
Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year
1937, 1938
Succeeded by
Nile Kinnick

  Results from FactBites:
 
Don Budge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (708 words)
John Donald Budge (June 13, 1915 January 26, 2000) was a champion tennis player who became famous as the first man to win in a single year the four tournaments that compose the Grand Slam of tennis.
Born in Oakland, California, Budge was the son of a Scottish immigrant and former soccer player.
In 1938 Budge dominated amateur tennis, defeating John Bromwich in the Australian Open final, Roderick Menzel in the French Open, Henry "Bunny" Austin at the Wimbledon Championships, where he never lost a set, and Gene Mako in the U.S. Open, to become the first person ever to win the Grand Slam in tennis.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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