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Encyclopedia > Don't ask, don't tell

"Don't ask, don't tell" is the common term for the U.S. military policy which implements Pub.L. 103-160 (10 U.S.C. § 654). Unless one of the numerous exceptions from 10 U.S.C. § 654(b) applies, the policy prohibits anyone who "demonstrate(s) a propensity or intent to engage in homosexual acts" from serving in the armed forces of the United States, because it "would create an unacceptable risk to the high standards of morale, good order and discipline, and unit cohesion that are the essence of military capability." The act prohibits any homosexual or bisexual person from disclosing his or her sexual orientation, or from speaking about any homosexual relationships, including marriages or other familial attributes, while serving in the United States armed forces. The policy also requires that as long as gay or bisexual men and women in the military hide their sexual orientation, commanders are not allowed to investigate their sexuality. The net effect of this policy is that the military does not take an official stance against gay or bisexual desire; one must engage in open homosexual acts to commit a punishable offense. This article is about the 2002 movie. ... Dont Ask, Dont Tell is the eighteenth episode from the dramedy series Ugly Betty, which aired on March 22, 2007. ... Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... “Bisexual” redirects here. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ...

Contents

Beginning of the policy

The policy was introduced as a compromise measure in 1993 and approved by then President Bill Clinton who, while campaigning for the Presidency, had promised to allow all citizens regardless of sexual orientation to serve openly in the military, a departure from the then complete ban on those who are not heterosexual. The actual policy was crafted by Colin Powell and has been maintained by Clinton's successor, George W. Bush. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Heterosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love or sexual desire exclusively for members of the opposite sex or gender, contrasted with homosexuality and distinguished from bisexuality and asexuality. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...

Sexual orientation will not be a bar to service unless manifested by homosexual conduct. The military will discharge members who engage in homosexual conduct, which is defined as a homosexual act, a statement that the member is homosexual or bisexual, or a marriage or attempted marriage to someone of the same gender.

quoted in "The Pentagon's New Policy Guidelines on Homosexuals in the Military", The New York Times (July 20, 1993), p.A14. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...

More generally, "Don't ask, don't tell" has come to describe any instance in which one person must keep sexual preference and any related attributes, including family, a secret, but where deliberate lying would be undesirable.


History

During the American Revolutionary War, the armed forces treated sodomy (then broadly defined as oral or anal sexual conduct) as grounds for being dishonorably discharged. The first such recorded discharge was in 1778, when Lieutenant Gotthold Frederick Enslin was (with the approval of General George Washington) dishonorably discharged following a conviction of homosexual sodomy and perjury. The Articles of War maintained the crime of sodomy, but it was not until 1942 that the armed forces considered homosexual status (as assessed by the military through a process of recruitment screening or internal investigations) as grounds for being separated from the military. Thus, anyone in the armed forces labeled as gay or bisexual were subject to criminal sanctions under the sodomy prohibition, or could be given a dishonorable discharge (often a Section 8) and returned to civilian life, where they would not receive veterans benefits and often had difficulty finding employment because most civilian employers knew what a Section 8 discharge meant. This article is about military actions only. ... François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ... Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... The Royal Navys Articles of War were used to govern British ships at sea in the Napoleonic Wars and have been used as models for later marshal and maritime law. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Section 8 refers to a discharge from the United States military for reason of being mentally unfit for service. ... A veteran refers to a person who is experienced in a particular area, particularly referring to people in the armed forces. ...


The success of the armed forces in pre-screening self-identified gay and bisexual people from the 1940s through 1981 remains in dispute; during the Vietnam Conflict, some men pretended to be gay in order to avoid the draft. However, a significant number of gay and bisexual men and women did manage to avoid the pre-screening process and serve in the military, some with special distinction. For example, in the 1950s and 1960s, the Navy medical doctor Tom Dooley received national fame for his anti-Communist and humanitarian efforts in Vietnam. His homosexuality was something of an open secret in the Navy, but eventually he was forced to resign; the Navy subsequently conducted the first official study on sexual orientation and the Navy regulations and rules. The 1957 report, titled Report of the Board Appointed to Prepare and Submit Recommendations to the Secretary of the Navy for the Revision of Policies, Procedures and Directives Dealing With Homosexuals (better known as the Crittenden Report) found that gay-identified people were no more likely to be a security risk than heterosexual-identified people, and found there was no rational basis for excluding gay people from the Navy, although it stopped short of recommending a change in the regulations because of social mores. The Vietnam War was a war fought between 1957 and 1975 on the ground in South Vietnam and bordering areas of Cambodia and Laos (See Secret War) and in bombing runs (Rolling Thunder) over North Vietnam. ... Dr. Thomas Anthony Dooley III (January 17, 1927 - January 18, 1961) was an American physician who worked in Vietnam and Laos. ...


Beyond the official regulations, gay people were often the target of various types of harassment by their fellow servicemen, designed to persuade them to resign from the military or turn themselves in to investigators. The most infamous type of such harassment was called a blanket party; during the night in the barracks, several service members first covered the face of the victim with a blanket and then committed assault, often quite severely and sometimes even fatally, as in the case of Allen R. Schindler, Jr.. When passing the "Don't ask, don't tell" bill, President Clinton cited U.S. Navy Radioman Third Class Schindler, who was brutally murdered by shipmate Terry M. Helvey (with the aid of an accomplice), leaving a "nearly-unrecognizable corpse".[1] The introduction of "Don't ask, don't tell" with the later amendment of "don't pursue, don't harass" has officially prohibited such behavior, but reports suggest that such harassment continues.[citation needed] Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Allen R. Schindler, Jr. ... USN redirects here. ... The Radioman was also spelled radio-man and radio man. ... U.S. Navy Good conduct variation U.S. Navy Petty Officer Third Class insignia Petty Officer Third Class is the fourth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Seaman and below Petty Officer Second Class, and is the lowest form of non-commissioned...


The degree of official and unofficial attempts to separate gay people from the armed forces seems to be directly related to the personnel needs of the armed forces.[citation needed] Hence, during wartime, it has not been uncommon for the rules regarding homosexuality to be relaxed. Until 1981, it was the policy of all branches of the armed forces to retain, at their discretion, anyone suspected of homosexual activity, thus promoting the "queen for a day" rule, which allowed a person accused of homosexuality to remain in the armed forces if one could successfully claim that their behavior was only a singular occurrence.[citation needed] This especially became the case during the Vietnam War.[citation needed]


During the 1970s, several high-profile court challenges to the military's regulations on homosexuality occurred, with little success, and when such successes did occur it was when the plaintiff had been open about his homosexuality from the beginning or due to the existence of the "queen for a day" rule. In 1981, the Department of Defense issued a new regulation on homosexuality that was designed to ensure withstanding a court challenge by developing uniform and clearly defined regulations and justifications that made homosexual status, whether self-applied or by the military, and conduct grounds for discharge (DOD Directive 1332.14 (Enlisted Administrative Separations), January, 1981): The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Department of Defense redirects here. ...

Homosexuality is incompatible with military service. The presence in the military environment of persons who engage in homosexual conduct or who, by their statements, demonstrate a propensity to engage in homosexual conduct, seriously impairs the accomplishment of the military mission. The presence of such members adversely affects the ability of the armed forces to maintain discipline, good order, and morale; to foster mutual trust and confidence among service members; to insure the integrity of the system of rank and command; to facilitate assignment and worldwide deployment of service members who frequently must live and work in close conditions affording minimal privacy; to recruit and retain members of the armed forces; to maintain the public acceptability of military service; and to prevent breaches of security.

The directive justified the policy and removed the "queen for a day" rule that had prompted some courts to rule against the armed forces. However, the intent of the policy had also been to treat homosexuality as being akin to a disability discharge and thus ensure that anyone found engaging in homosexual activity and/or identifying as gay, would be separated with an honorable discharge. The DOD policy has since withstood most court challenges, although the United States Supreme Court has refused to weigh in on the constitutionality of the policy, preferring to allow lower courts and the United States Congress to settle the matter. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...


In the 1980s, many of the Democratic Party presidential candidates expressed an interest in changing the regulations concerning homosexuality in the armed forces, and, as American social mores changed, public opinion began to express more sympathy with gay people in armed forces, at least to the extent that investigations into a serviceman or -woman's sexual behaviour and/or orientation were seen as a witch-hunt. "Gays in the military" became a political issue during the 1992 Presidential campaign, when Clinton, the Democratic candidate, promised to lift the military's ban on homosexual and bisexual people. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The United States presidential elections of 1992 featured a battle between Republican George Bush, the incumbent President; Democrat Bill Clinton, the governor of Arkansas; and independent candidate Ross Perot, a Texas businessman. ...


In 1992, the United States General Accounting Office published a report entitled Defense Force Management: DOD’s Policy on Homosexuality. GAO/NSAID-92-98, that outlined the DOD policy on homosexuality and the reasons for it. The report also included excerpts from a previously unpublished 1988 DOD study on homosexuality that made similar conclusions as the 1957 Crittenden Report. In 1993 the two reports were published alongside an argument by an armed forces general who argued against lifting the ban on homosexual- and bisexual-identified people based on a belief that they pose a security risk, will erode unit cohesion and morale alongside the argument that most homosexual and bisexual oriented people are pedophiles who engage in a self-destructive and immoral life-style. Pedophilia, paedophilia, or pædophilia (see spelling differences), is the paraphilia of being sexually attracted primarily or exclusively to pre-pubescent children. ...


Congressional opposition to lifting the ban on gay and bisexual people in the armed forces was led by Democratic Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia who organized Congressional hearings that largely buffed the armed forces position that has remained unchanged since the 1981 directive. While Congressional support for reform was led by Democratic Congressman Barney Frank of Massachusetts, who fought for a compromise, and retired Republican Senator Barry Goldwater, who argued for a complete repeal of the ban. After a large number of people flooded the Congressional phone lines with oppositions to lifting the ban, President Clinton soon backed off on his campaign promise to lift the ban on homosexual and bisexual people in the armed forces. The final result was a Congressional compromise of "Don't ask, don't tell" that was later amended to include "don't harass". Officially, the compromise dictates that the armed forces will no longer ask recruits about their sexual activity and/or orientation, will not investigate any serviceman or servicewoman's sexual activity and/or orientation without solid evidence (thus preventing witch-hunts), and self-identified homosexual servicemen and women agree that they will not engage in homosexual sex acts, or do anything that announces that they are a homosexual, i.e. public statements or participate in a same-sex marriage openly. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Samuel Augustus Nunn, Jr. ... Barnett Barney Frank (born March 31, 1940) is an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ...


In 2000, Northwestern University Professor Charles Moskos, the principal author of DADT (which, as originally coined by Moskos, was "Don't Ask Don't Tell; Don't Seek Don't Flaunt"), told "Lingua Franca" that he felt that policy will be gone within five to ten years. Moskos also dismissed the unit cohesion argument, instead arguing that gay people should be banned due to "modesty rights", saying "Fuck unit cohesion. I don't care about that...I should not be forced to shower with a woman. I should not be forced to shower with a gay [man]." Moskos did not offer any alternative to his DADT policy. [2] Professor Charles Moskos Charles C. Moskos II, influential military sociologist in the United States Military and a professor at Northwestern University. ...

In 2005, member of Congress Marty Meehan (third from left) unsuccessfully attempted to repeal the policy
In 2005, member of Congress Marty Meehan (third from left) unsuccessfully attempted to repeal the policy

On September 13, 2005, the Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Military (on October 23, 2006 renamed the Michael D. Palm Center), a think tank affiliated with the University of California, Santa Barbara, issued a news release revealing the existence of a 1999 FORSCOM regulation (Regulation 500-3-3) that allowed the active duty deployment of Army Reservists and National Guard troops who say that they are gay or who are accused of being gay. U.S. Army Forces Command spokesperson Kim Waldron later confirmed the regulation and indicated that it was intended to prevent Reservists and National Guard members from pretending to be gay to escape combat.[3] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x948, 674 KB) Summary United States Congressman Marty Meehan was joined by retired Flag Officers to announce his legislation to repeal Dont Ask, Dont Tell From Left to Right: Brigadier General Keith Kerr, Brigadier General Virgil Richard, Congressman Meehan... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x948, 674 KB) Summary United States Congressman Marty Meehan was joined by retired Flag Officers to announce his legislation to repeal Dont Ask, Dont Tell From Left to Right: Brigadier General Keith Kerr, Brigadier General Virgil Richard, Congressman Meehan... Martin Thomas Marty Meehan (born December 30, 1956) is an American attorney and politician from the state of Massachusetts. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the institution. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... Supporting the American Army ...


"Don't ask, don't tell" has been upheld five times in federal court, and in a recent Supreme Court case, Rumsfeld v. Forum for Academic and Institutional Rights, the Supreme Court unanimously held that the federal government could withhold funding in order to force universities to accept military recruiters in spite of their nondiscrimination policies.[4] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Holding Because Congress could require law schools to provide equal access to military recruiters without violating the schools’ freedoms of speech and association, the Third Circuit erred in holding that the Solomon Amendment likely violates the First Amendment. ...


Public opinion

Polls have shown that a large majority of the American public favors allowing gay and lesbian people to serve openly in the U.S. military. A national poll conducted in May 2005 by the Boston Globe showed 79% of participants having nothing against openly gay people from serving in the military. A Pew Research Center survey conducted in March 2006 showed that 60% favor allowing gays and lesbians to serve openly in the military, with 31% opposed. [2] However, the military remains largely opposed. An Army Times poll of military members only found 25% in favor of allowing homosexuals to serve openly. [3] The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ...


Statistics

Statistics on the number of persons discharged from the military due to homosexuality in the fiscal years since the policy was first introduced (1993):

Year Coast Guard Marines Navy Army Air Force Total
1994 0 36 258 136 187 617
1995 15 69 269 184 235 772
1996 12 60 315 199 284 870
1997 10 78 413 197 309 1,007
1998 14 77 345 312 415 1,163
1999 12 97 314 271 352 1,046
2000 19 104 358 573 177 1,231
2001* 1,273
2002* 906
2003* 787
2004 15 59 177 325 92 668
2005 16 75 177 386 88 742
Total 113 655 2,626 2,583 2,139 11,082
  • * Breakdown of discharges by service branch not available
  • 1994-2003 from Servicemembers Legal Defense Network - Annual Gay Discharges Under "Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Don't Pursue, Don't Harass"
  • 2004-2005 from 365Gay.com - Military Discharging Two Soldiers Per Day For Being Gay Despite War Group Says

USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... USN redirects here. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The Servicemembers Legal Defense Network (SLDN) is a non-profit legal services, watchdog, and policy organization in the United States. ...

Financial impact of policy

In February 2005, the Government Accountability Office released estimates on the cost of the policy. Cautioning that the amount may be too low, the GAO reported $95.4 million in recruiting costs and $95.1 million for training replacements for the 9,488 troops discharged from 1994 through 2003.[5] General Accounting Office headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the non-partisan audit, evaluation, and investigative arm of Congress, and an agency in the Legislative Branch of the United States Government. ...


In February 2006, a University of California Blue Ribbon Commission including Lawrence Korb, a former assistant defense secretary during the Reagan administration, former Defense Secretary William Perry, a member of the Clinton administration, and professors from West Point U.S. Military Academy concluded that figure should be closer to $363 million, including $14.3 million for "separation travel" once a service member is discharged, $17.8 million for training officers, $252.4 million for training enlistees and $79.3 million in recruiting costs.[6] The commission report stated that the GAO didn't take into account the value the military lost from the departures. Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Blue-Ribbon Panel (sometimes called a Blue Ribbon Commission) is an informal term generally used to describe a group of exceptional persons appointed to investigate or study a given question. ... Lawrence J. Korb is a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and a Senior Adviser to the Center for Defense Information. ... Reagan redirects here. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate, and is a member of the Cabinet. ... Secretary of Defense William Perry talks to reporters at Kigali Airport, Rwanda after his arrival to check on status of the relief operation, 1994. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... A military academy is a military educational institution. ...


Military Readiness Enhancement Act

The Military Readiness Enhancement Act (H.R. 1246) is a bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on February 28, 2007. Sponsored by Representative Marty Meehan (D-MA) with 136 cosponsors, the bill is currently in committee. A bill is a proposed new law introduced within a legislature that has not been ratified, adopted, or received assent. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Martin Thomas Marty Meehan (born December 30, 1956) is an American attorney and politician from the state of Massachusetts. ...


The stated purpose of the bill is "to amend title 10, United States Code, to enhance the readiness of the Armed Forces by replacing the current policy concerning homosexuality in the Armed Forces, referred to as 'Don't ask, don't tell', with a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation."


A previous version of the bill was introduced in the Republican-controlled 109th Congress. The bill did not make it out of committee. United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ...


Criticism from military personnel

Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. John Shalikashvili (Ret.)[7] and former Senator and Secretary of Defense William Cohen[citation needed] spoke against the policy publicly in early January 2007: "I now believe that if gay men and lesbians served openly in the United States military, they would not undermine the efficacy of the armed forces," General Shalikashvili wrote. "Our military has been stretched thin by our deployments in the Middle East, and we must welcome the service of any American who is willing and able to do the job."[8] The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ... John Malchase David Shalikashvili (born 27 June 1936) is a retired American general who served as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1993 to 1997. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... William Sebastian Cohen (1940- ) is an author and American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ...


In December 2007, 28 retired generals and admirals urged Congress to repeal the policy. They cited evidence that 65,000 gay men and women are currently serving in the armed forces, and that there are over 1,000,000 gay veterans.[8]


2008 Presidential candidates' positions

Democratic candidates Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, Republican candidate Ron Paul, and Libertarian candidates Wayne Allyn Root and George Phillies all favor repealing the policy and allowing gay and lesbian people to serve openly in the armed forces. Republican candidate John McCain supports keeping the current policy.[8] REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Ronald Ernest Ron Paul (b. ... Wayne Root (more commonly known as Wayne Allyn Root) is a business mogul, television celebrity, TV producer, best-selling author, professional sports handicapper, and aspiring politician based in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... George Phillies (born 23 July 1947) is a Libertarian Party activist and professor of physics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ...


Situation outside the United States

Some Western military forces have now removed policies excluding individuals of other sexual orientations (with strict policies on sexual harassment). Of the 25 countries that participate militarily in NATO, more than twenty permit gay people to serve; of the permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, two (Britain, France) permit gay people to serve openly, and three (United States, Russia, China) do not. LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The militaries of the world have a variety of responses to gays, lesbians and bisexuals. ... Sexual harassment is harassment or unwelcome attention of a sexual nature. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... “Security Council” redirects here. ...


United Kingdom

The United Kingdom's policy is to allow gay men and lesbians to serve openly and discrimination on a sexual orientation basis is forbidden. It is also forbidden for someone to pressure LGBT people to come out. All personnel are subject to the same "no-touching" rules. For other uses, see Coming out (disambiguation). ...


Israel

The IDF policies allow for gay men and lesbians to serve openly without discrimination or harassment due to actual or perceived sexual orientation. Moreover, gays in the IDF have special rights, such as the right to take a shower alone if they want to. Emblem of the IDF The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ... Emblem of the IDF The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ...


Switzerland

Switzerland's military policies also allow for gay men and lesbians to serve openly without discrimination or harassment due to actual or perceived sexual orientation.


See also

Allen R. Schindler, Jr. ... A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... PFC Barry Winchell Barry Winchell (31 August 1977—6 July 1999) was an infantry soldier in the United States Army, whose murder by a fellow soldier, Calvin Glover, became a point of reference in the ongoing debate about the Dont Ask, Dont Tell policy enforced by the military... Margarethe Cammermeyer (born March 24, 1943) is a former colonel in the Washington National Guard and a gay rights activist. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The militaries of the world have a variety of responses to gays, lesbians and bisexuals. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Belkin, Dr. Aaron." Abandoning "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Will Decrease Anti-Gay Violence" Naval Institute: Proceedings Monthly. 1 May, 2005. [1]
  2. ^ Frank, Nathaniel. "The Real Story of Military Sociology and 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'", Lingua Franca (magazine), October 2000, pp. 71-81. Retrieved on 2008-08-09. 
  3. ^ Chibbaro, Lou (2005). Out gay soldiers sent to Iraq - Regulation keeps straights from ‘playing gay’ to avoid war. Washington Blade. Retrieved on 2006-03-06.
  4. ^ Mears, Bill (2006). Justices uphold military recruiting on campuses. CNN Law Center. Retrieved on 2006-03-06.
  5. ^ Report: 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' costs $363M. USA Today, Washington/Politics (2006). Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  6. ^ Report: 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' costs $363M. USA Today, Washington/Politics (2006). Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  7. ^ Lubold, Gordon. "Former JCS chairman: It’s time to give ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy another look", Air Force Times, 2007-01-15. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  8. ^ a b c Shanker, Tom; Healy, Patrick. "A New Push to Roll Back 'Don't Ask, Don’t Tell'", New York Times, 2007-11-30. Retrieved on 2007-12-03. 

Lingua Franca was a magazine about intellectual and literary life in academia. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  1. Johansson, Warren and William A Percy. Outing: Shattering the Conspiracy of Silence. Harrington Park Press, 1994.
  2. Shilits, Randy (1994). Conduct Unbecoming: Gays and Lesbians in the US Military.
  3. Carter, Chad C. and Kolenc, Antony B. Law Review Article:"Don't Ask, Don't Tell:" Has the Policy Met Its Goals?PDF (157 KiB) University of Dayton Law Review, Fall 2005.
  4. Zylbergold,Bonnie (2007) "The Key to Enlightenment: Semper-fi, a documentary about ex-marine Jeff Key, showcased at Frameline31", American Sexuality Magazine

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External links

  • 10 U.S.C. § 654 — Policy concerning homosexuality in the armed forces
  • Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports regarding Gays and U.S. Military Policy
  • Human Rights Campaign
  • Servicemembers Legal Defense Network
  • Chronology of "Don't ask, don't tell"
  • Michael D. Palm Center
  • A New Kind of War, An Old Kind of Prejudice by Brian W. Fairbanks
  • Blue Alliance - LGBT Alumni of the US Air Force Acdemy
Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... “Bisexual” redirects here. ... A transgender woman at New York Citys gay pride parade Transgender (IPA: , from trans (Latin) and gender (English)) is a general term applied to a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups involving tendencies that diverge from the normative gender role (woman or man) commonly, but not always, assigned at... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... For the novel by William S. Burroughs, see Queer (novel). ... Attitude, clothing, ethnicity, masculinity, physique and youth are all elements of what has been called banjee realness. Banjee or banjee boy is a term from the 1980s or earlier that describes a certain type of young Man who is thugged out and has a sexy body and they have sex... A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church, a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ... Heterosexism is the presumption that everyone is straight or heterosexual (i. ... Societal attitudes towards homosexuality vary greatly in different cultures and different historical periods, as do attitudes toward sexual desire, activity and relationships in general. ... The relationship between religion and homosexuality varies greatly across time and place, within and between different religions and sects, and regarding different forms of homosexuality and bisexuality. ... Sexuality researchers are often interested in homosexuality because there is evidence from twin studies that there is a biological involvement in its determination. ... Homosexuality and psychology have a closely intertwined history. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ... “Bisexual” redirects here. ... Someone who is bi-curious does not identify as bisexual, but has an interest in both men and women to one degree or another. ... Pansexuality (sometimes referred to as omnisexuality[1]) is a sexual orientation characterized by the potential for aesthetic attraction, romantic love and/or sexual desire for people regardless of their gender identity or biological sex. ... Gay-for-pay is the slang term accorded to male (and sometimes, but less frequently, female) actors, pornographic stars or prostitutes who identify as heterosexual but perform homosexual acts professionally. ... Prison sexuality deals with sexual relationships between confined individuals or those between a prisoner and a prison employee (or other persons to whom prisoners have access). ... Biphobia is the fear of, discrimination against, or hatred of bisexuals (although in practice it extends to pansexual people too). ... Bisexual chic is a phrase used to describe bisexuality. ... Bisexual erasure is the tendency to ignore, remove, falsify, or reexplain evidence of bisexuality in the historical record, academic materials, the news media, and other primary sources. ... The portrayal of bisexuality in the media reflects societal attitudes towards bisexuality. ... A transgender woman at New York Citys gay pride parade Transgender (IPA: , from trans (Latin) and gender (English)) is a general term applied to a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups involving tendencies that diverge from the normative gender role (woman or man) commonly, but not always, assigned at... For the electronic music EP by Mr. ... A male dressed as a female. ... This articles is about cross-dressing in general, that is the act of wearing the clothing of another gender for any reason. ... Berdache (from French, from Arabic bardajo meaning kept boy) is a generic term used by some for a third gender (woman-living-man) among many, if not most, Native American tribes. ... Genderqueer or intergender is a gender identity of both, neither or some combination of man and/or woman. In relation to the gender binary (the view that there are only two genders), genderqueer people generally identify as more both/and or neither/nor, rather than either/or. ... For other uses, see Androgyny (disambiguation). ... Anna P., who lived for many years as a man in Germany, was photographed for Magnus Hirschfelds book Sexual Intermediates in 1922. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Homosexuality and transgender are two separate concepts. ... A drag king performance troupe NYC Drag King Alliance Switch NPlay photo:Jenny Norris Drag kings are mostly female-bodied or -identified performance artists who dress in masculine drag and personify male gender stereotypes as part of their performance. ... A drag artist Lypsinka. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights LGBT rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Feminism Mens/Fathers rights · Masculinism Children... Sex reassignment therapy is an umbrella term for all medical procedures regarding gender reassignment of both transgender and intersexual people. ... Transsexual people are those who establish a permanent identity with the gender opposite to that which they were assigned at birth. ... // Several movies feature transgender as a central plot element, including: Glen or Glenda? (1953) is a semi-autobiographical movie starring its director Ed Wood, who was a transvestite. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
HRC | Don't Ask, Don't Tell (1416 words)
The military is banned from asking questions about a service member's sexual orientation, and significant restrictions are placed on commanders seeking to investigate the possibility that a service member may be gay.
Before "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," the stated policy of the U.S. military was that "homosexuality is incompatible with military service." All recruits were asked about their sexual orientation before they were allowed to serve.
The "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy offers no safe space for service members dealing with such harassment, as psychotherapists, chaplains and doctors have all been known to report service members struggling with their sexual orientation or with harassment based on their perceived sexual orientation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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