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Encyclopedia > Dominus Iesus

Dominus Iesus (Latin for "Lord Jesus") is a document by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, then prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, and the Congregation's then secretary, Tarcisio Bertone. The document, published on August 6, 2000, is subtitled "On the Unicity and Salvific Universality of Jesus Christ and the Church". Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: , born Joseph Alois Ratzinger on April 16, 1927 in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria, Germany) is the 265th[1] and reigning Pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church, and sovereign of Vatican City State. ... A prefect (from the Latin praefectus, perfect participle of praeficere, to make in front, i. ... The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. ... Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone is the Archbishop of Genoa and was considered papabile following the death of Pope John Paul II. His Eminence Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone (born 2 December 1934) is Archbishop of Genoa and a Cardinal Priest in the Roman Catholic Church. ... August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


A Catholic dogma, Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus, teaches that "there is no salvation outside the Church", which has often been interpreted as denying salvation to non-Catholic Christians as well as non-Christians. This belief, however, is commonly misunderstood. Constant Catholic teaching has stressed the possibility of salvation for persons invincibly ignorant (through no fault of their own) of the Catholic Church's necessity and thus not culpable for not being in communion with the Church. In the 20th century this inclusive approach was expressed in the condemnation of Feeneyism and in the declaration of the Second Vatican Council, which said that "the plan of salvation also includes those who acknowledge the Creator", thus potentially extending salvation to other monotheistic faiths. Vatican II further affirmed that salvation was available to people who had not even heard of Christ (cf. Acts 17:23) - but that all who gain salvation do so only by membership in the Catholic Church, whether that membership is explicit or implicit. Dogma (the plural is either dogmata or dogmas) is belief or doctrine held by a religion, ideology or any kind of organization to be authoritative and not to be disputed or doubted. ... The Ecclesiastical Latin phrase Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus (sometimes briefly Extra Ecclesiam), literally meaning outside the church there is no salvation, is a slogan that summarises the doctrine that one must be a member of the Roman Catholic church in order to be saved. ... For other uses, see Salvation (disambiguation). ... // Father Leonard Feeney (1897-1978) was an American priest who propagated a rigid interpretation of the Catholic doctrine extra ecclesiam nulla salus, or outside the church there is no salvation, denying baptism of blood and baptism of desire as heretical innovations and that all unbaptized human beings (in the Catholic... The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... Monotheism (in Greek μόνος = single and θεός = God) is the belief in the existence of one God, or in the oneness of God. ...


Such Vatican documents have led some to question the Church's commitment to ecumenism. Pope John Paul II personally endorsed Dominus Iesus, and ratified and confirmed it "with sure knowledge and by his apostolic authority" (a formal sentence used at the beginning or at the point of signature of an official document). The word ecumenism (also oecumenism, œcumenism) (IPA: ) is derived from the Greek oikoumene, which means the inhabited world. In its broadest meaning ecumenism is the religious initiative towards world-wide unity. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from October 16, 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate. ...


This document [1] states that people outside of Christianity are "in a gravely deficient situation in comparison with those who, in the Church, have the fullness of the means of salvation", and that non-Catholic Christian communities had "defects". Some non-Catholic groups have interpreted this as disparagement of their faiths while others have appreciated that the Church position does not deny the salvation of those separate from the Catholic Church. The word faith has various uses; its central meaning is similar to belief, trust or confidence, but unlike these terms, faith tends to imply a transpersonal rather than interpersonal relationship – with God or a higher power. ...


In response to these criticisms, Pope John Paul II on October 2 of that year emphasized that this document did not say that non-Christians were denied salvation: "this confession does not deny salvation to non-Christians, but points to its ultimate source in Christ, in whom man and God are united". John Paul II then issued on December 6 a statement to emphasize further that the Church continued in the position of Vatican II that salvation was available to believers of other faiths: "The Gospel teaches us that those who live in accordance with the Beatitudes - the poor in spirit, the pure of heart, those who bear lovingly the sufferings of life - will enter God's kingdom." He further added, "All who seek God with a sincere heart, including those who do not know Christ and his church, contribute under the influence of grace to the building of this kingdom." October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A church building (or simply church) is a building used in Christian worship. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... The Beatitudes (from Latin, beatitudo, happiness) is the name given to a well-known, definitive and central, portion of the Sermon on the Mount of the Gospel of Matthew. ...


A remarkable but unappreciated "reaching out" can be found in the actual official Latin text of this document. [2] Here, in the Latin text, the famous "filioque clause," ("and the Son") is left out without comment. The filioque clause remains a highly controversial change to what is called The Nicene Creed. The clause was added by the Third Council of Toledo in 589. In Latin, the changed sentence is "Credo in Spiritum Sanctum qui ex patre filioque procedit ("I believe in the Holy Spirit who proceeds from the Father and the Son.") One external site [3] summarizes the significance of the Filioque clause, saying, "The filioque clause was probably devised in response to Arianism, which denied the full divinity of the Son....The insertion of filioque clause to the Nicene Creed was one of the reasons behind the great schism of CE 1035 which led to the split in the Chalcedonian Christianity. The Eastern and Western churches have remained separate, and the doctrine represented by the term filioque stands as one of the primary points of difference between them." Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... In Christian theology the filioque clause or filioque controversy (filioque meaning and [from] the Son) is a heavily disputed part of the Nicene Creed, that forms a divisive difference between some Christian sects. ... In Christian theology the filioque clause or filioque controversy (filioque meaning and [from] the Son) is a heavily disputed part of the Nicene Creed, that forms a divisive difference between some Christian sects. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... marks the entry of Catholic Christianity into the rule of Visigothic Spain. ...


The lack of this filioque clause may have been due to limit of space, focus of theme, restrictions of time, or even due to merciful disinclusion from subject matter, although it was still universally recognised. Regardless, there is no basis for the idea that a cardinal would stay the Nicene Creed in part or totality, while it is more likely that even a future Pope would kindly refuse mention of existing contention while writing words of peace. Hence, no filioque clause was restated because it was already existent and required no further presence in the document of Dominus Iesus.


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Dominus Iesus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (629 words)
Dominus Iesus (Latin for "Lord Jesus") is a document by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, then prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, and the Congregation's then secretary, Tarcisio Bertone.
Pope John Paul II personally endorsed Dominus Iesus, and ratified and confirmed it "with sure knowledge and by his apostolic authority" (a formal sentence used at the beginning or at the point of signature of an official document).
This document [1] states that people outside of Christianity are "in a gravely deficient situation in comparison with those who, in the Church, have the fullness of the means of salvation", and that non-Catholic Christian communities had "defects".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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