FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Dominican Order
Saint Dominic saw the need for a new type of organization to a<a href="http://www.pimpmypage.com/viewimage/http://www.pimpmypage.com/userpics/cartoons/i118556654_59288.gif" title="MySpace Graphics @ Pimp My Page"><img border=0 src="http://www.pimpmypage.com/userpics/cartoons/i118556654_59288.gif" /></a> <a href="http://www.pimpmypage.com/" target="_blank">MySpace Codes </a>ddress the needs of his time, one that would bring the dedication and systematic education of the older monastic orders to bear on the religious problems of the burgeoning population of cities, but with more organizational flexibility than either monastic orders or the secular clergy
Saint Dominic saw the need for a new type of organization to a<a href="http://www.pimpmypage.com/viewimage/http://www.pimpmypage.com/userpics/cartoons/i118556654_59288.gif" title="MySpace Graphics @ Pimp My Page"><img border=0 src="http://www.pimpmypage.com/userpics/cartoons/i118556654_59288.gif" /></a>
<a href="http://www.pimpmypage.com/" target="_blank">MySpace Codes </a>ddress the needs of his time, one that would bring the dedication and systematic education of the older monastic orders to bear on the religious problems of the burgeoning population of cities, but with more organizational flexibility than either monastic orders or the secular clergy

The Order of Preachers (Ordo fratrum Praedicatorum), after 15th century more commonly known as the Dominican Order, or Dominicans is a Catholic religious order, created by Saint Dominic in the early 13th century in France. A Dominican friar is a member of one of the mendicant orders, the Dominican Order. The word friar is etymologically related to the word for "brother" in Latin.[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (548x830, 79 KB) Summary St Dominic of Guzman by Claudio, Coello Spanish painter, Madrid school (b. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (548x830, 79 KB) Summary St Dominic of Guzman by Claudio, Coello Spanish painter, Madrid school (b. ... Saint Dominic (Spanish: Domingo), also known as Dominic of Osma, often called Dominic de Guzmán and Domingo de Guzmán Garcés (1170 – August 6, 1221) was the founder of the Friars Preachers, popularly called the Dominicans or Order of Preachers (OP), a Catholic religious order. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Catholic religious orders (Religious Institutes, cf. ... Saint Dominic (Spanish: Domingo), also known as Dominic of Osma, often called Dominic de Guzmán and Domingo de Guzmán Garcés (1170 – August 6, 1221) was the founder of the Friars Preachers, popularly called the Dominicans or Order of Preachers (OP), a Catholic religious order. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... The mendicant orders are religious orders which depend directly on begging, or the charity of the people for their livelihood. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


In England and some other countries the Dominicans are referred to as Blackfriars on account of the black cappa or cloak they wear over their white habits (for the same reason, Carmelites are known as "Whitefriars" and Franciscans as "Greyfriars" — though some Franciscan congregations wear brown habits). In France, the Dominicans are also known as Jacobins, because their first convent in Paris bore the name "Saint Jacques", and Jacques is Jacobus in Latin. They have also been referred to using the ancient Latin pun, as "Domini canes", or "The Hounds of the Lord", a reference to the order's reputation as most obedient servants of the faith, with perhaps a sometimes negative connotation or reference to the order's involvement with the Holy Inquisition. Members of the order generally carry the letters O.P. after their name. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... St. ... The Order of Our Lady of Mt. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Saint Dominic established a religious community in Toulouse in 1214, officially recognized as an order by Pope Honorius III in 1216. Founded under the Augustinian rule, the Dominican Order is one of the great orders of mendicant friars that revolutionized religious life in Europe during the High Middle Ages. Founded to preach the gospel and to combat heresy, the Order is famed for its intellectual tradition, having produced many leading theologians and philosophers. The Dominican Order is headed by the Master of the Order, who is currently Brother Carlos Azpiroz Costa. New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics Land... Events Simon Apulia becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Pope Honorius III (1148 – March 18, 1227 in Rome), born Cencio Savelli, was Pope from 1216 to 1227. ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... Catholic religious orders (Religious Institutes, cf. ... The mendicant orders are religious orders which depend directly on begging, or the charity of the people for their livelihood. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The cathedral Notre Dame de Paris, a significant architectural contribution of the High Middle Ages. ... The Master of the Order of Preachers is the worldwide leader of the Order of Preachers, commonly known as the Dominicans. ... Category: &#x202a;Possible copyright violations&#x202c; ...

Contents

Foundation of the Order

Like his contemporary Francis of Assisi, Dominic saw the need for a new type of organization to address the needs of his time, and the quick growth of the Dominicans and Franciscans during their first century confirms that the orders of mendicant friars met a need. Saint Francis of Assisi (September 26, 1181 – October 3, 1226) was a Roman Catholic friar and the founder of the Order of Friars Minor, more commonly known as the Franciscans. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ...


Dominic sought to establish a new kind of order, one that would bring the dedication and systematic education of the older monastic orders like the Benedictines to bear on the religious problems of the burgeoning population of cities, but with more organizational flexibility than either monastic orders or the secular clergy. Dominic's new order was to be a preaching order, trained to preach in the vernacular languages but with a sound background in academic theology. Rather than earning their living on vast farms as the monasteries had done, the new friars would survive by begging, "selling" themselves through persuasive preaching. They were initially scorned by more traditional orders, who thought these "urban monks" would never survive the temptations of the city. For the college, see Benedictine College. ... Preaching is the most important element in the protestant churches. ... Look up Vernacular in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ...


Dominic saw the need to establish a new kind of order when travelling through the south of France. He had been asked to accompany his bishop from Osma on a diplomatic mission to Denmark, to arrange the marriage between the son of King Alfonso VIII of Castile and a niece of King Valdemar II of Denmark. At that time the south of France was the stronghold of Albigensian thought, centered around the town of Albi. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Coat of Arms of El Burgo de Osma Burgo de Osma_Ciudad de Osma is the third largest municipality in the province of Soria in Spain, with a population of about 5000. ... Alfonso VIII, centre, and Queen Eleanor, left. ... Valdemar II (1170–1241), called Valdemar the Conqueror or Valdemar the Victorious, was the King of Denmark from 1202 until 1241. ... Cathars being expelled from Carcassone in 1209. ... Albi is a town and commune in southern France. ...


This unorthodox expression of Christianity held that matter was evil and only spirit was good, a fundamental challenge to the notion of incarnation, central to Roman Catholic theology. The Albigensians, more commonly known as the Cathars (a heretical gnostic sect), lived very simply and saw themselves as more fervent followers of the poor Christ. Dominic saw the need for a response that would take the good elements in the Albigensian movement to sway them back to mainstream Christian thought. The mendicant preacher emerged from this insight. Unfortunately, Dominic's ideal of winning the Albigensians over was not held by all office bearers and the population of Albi was decimated in the Albigensian crusade. The Dominicans were also set up as the branch of the Catholic Church to deal with heresy. It was in this early period of the Albigensian crusade that St. Dominic ordered the burning of several heretical books. Indeed, many years after this initial crusade, the first Grand Inquistor of Spain would be drawn from the Dominican order, Tomás de Torquemada. Look up incarnation, incarnate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catharism. ... Heresy, as a blanket term, describes a practice or belief that is labeled as unorthodox. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (&#947;&#957;&#8182;&#963;&#953;&#962;), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... The Albigensian Crusade or Cathar Crusade (1209 - 1229) was a 20-year military campaign initiated by the Roman Catholic Church to eliminate the heresy of the Cathars of Languedoc. ...


The organization of the Order of Preachers was approved in December 1216 by Pope Honorius III (see also Religiosam vitam; Nos attendentes). // Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... Pope Honorius III (1148 – March 18, 1227 in Rome), born Cencio Savelli, was Pope from 1216 to 1227. ... Religiosam vitam is the incipit designating a Papal bull issued in December 1216 by Pope Honorius III. It established the Dominican Order (see also Nos attendentes). ... Nos attendentes is the incipit designating a Papal bull apparently issued in January 1217 by Pope Honorius III. Its genuineness has been suspected. ...


History of the Order

The history of the Order may be divided into three periods:

(15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...

Middle Ages

Doctor Angelicus, Doctor Universalis St. Thomas Aquinas considered by the Catholic Church to be its greatest theologian, is girded by angels with a mystical belt of purity after his proof of chastity
Doctor Angelicus, Doctor Universalis St. Thomas Aquinas considered by the Catholic Church to be its greatest theologian, is girded by angels with a mystical belt of purity after his proof of chastity

The Dominican friars were the first to arrive in England, appearing in Oxford in 1221.[2] The thirteenth century is the classic age of the Order, the witness to its brilliant development and intense activity. This last is manifested especially in the work of teaching. By preaching it reached all classes of Christian society, fought heresy, schism, and paganism by word and book, and by its missions to the north of Europe, to Africa, and Asia passed beyond the frontiers of Christendom. Its schools spread throughout the entire Church; its doctors wrote monumental works in all branches of knowledge and two among them, Albertus Magnus, and especially Thomas Aquinas, founded a school of philosophy and theology which was to rule the ages to come in the life of the Church. An enormous number of its members held offices in Church and State -- as popes, cardinals, bishops, legates, inquisitors, confessors of princes, ambassadors, and paciarii (enforcers of the peace decreed by popes or councils). The Order of Preachers, which should have remained a select body, developed beyond bounds and absorbed some elements ill-fitted to its form of life. A period of relaxation ensued during the fourteenth century owing to the general decline of Christian society. The weakening of doctrinal activity favoured the development here and there of the ascetic and contemplative life and there sprang up, especially in Germany and Italy, an intense and exuberant mysticism with which the names of Meister Eckhart, Heinrich Suso, Johannes Tauler, and St. Catherine of Siena are associated. (See German mysticism, which has also been called "Dominican mysticism.") This movement was the prelude to the reforms undertaken, at the end of the century, by Raymond of Capua, and continued in the following century. It assumed remarkable proportions in the congregations of Lombardy and the Netherlands, and in the reforms of Savonarola at Florence. At the same time the Order found itself face to face with the Renaissance. It struggled against pagan tendencies in humanism, in Italy through Dominici and Savonarola, in Germany through the theologians of Cologne but it also furnished humanism with such advanced writers as Francesco Colonna (writer of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili) and Matteo Bandello. Its members, in great numbers, took part in the artistic activity of the age, the most prominent being Fra Angelico and Fra Bartolomeo. Image File history File linksMetadata SaintThomasAquinas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata SaintThomasAquinas. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Heresy, as a blanket term, describes a practice or belief that is labeled as unorthodox. ... The word schism (IPA: or ), from the Greek σχίσμα, skhísma (from σχίζω, skhízō, to tear, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization or a movement. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Albertus Magnus (b. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... (13th century - 14th century - 15th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to 1400. ... The word ascetic derives from the ancient Greek term askesis (practice, training or exercise). ... The Meister Eckhart portal of the Erfurt Church. ... Heinrich Suso (March 21, 1300 - 1366), German mystic, was born of good family at Überlingen on Lake Constance, in all probability in the year 1300 He assumed the name of his mother, his father being a Herr von Berg. ... Johannes Tauler (c. ... Saint Catherine of Siena (March 25, 1347 - April 29, 1380) was a Dominican Tertiary (lay affiliate) of the Dominican Order. ... German Mysticism (Sometimes called Dominican mysticism or Rhineland mysticism) is the name given to a christian mystical movement in the Late Middle Ages, that was especially prominent in Germany, and in the Dominican order. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Girolamo Savonarola by Fra Bartolomeo, ca 1498 Girolamo Savonarola (September 21, 1452&#8211;May 23, 1498), also translated as Jerome Savonarola or Hieronymous Savonarola, was a Dominican priest and, briefly, ruler of Florence, who was known for religious reformation and anti-Renaissance preaching and his book burning and destruction of... This article is about the city in Italy. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... Francesco Colonna (1433 (?) - 1527), was an Italian Dominican priest and monk who was credited by an acrostic in the text with the authorship of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. ... It has been suggested that Poliphilo be merged into this article or section. ... Matteo Bandello (c. ... The Maestà (Madonna enthroned) with Saints Cosmas and Damian, Saint Mark and Saint John, Saint Lawrence and three Dominicans, Saint Dominic, Saint Thomas Aquinas and Saint Peter Martyr; San Marco, Florence. ... The Vision of St. ...


Modern Period

Bartolomé de Las Casas, as a settler in the New World, he was galvanized by witnessing the brutal torture and genocide of the Native Americans by the Spanish colonists. He became famous for his advocacy of the rights of Native Americans, whose cultures, especially in the Caribbean, he describes with care
Bartolomé de Las Casas, as a settler in the New World, he was galvanized by witnessing the brutal torture and genocide of the Native Americans by the Spanish colonists. He became famous for his advocacy of the rights of Native Americans, whose cultures, especially in the Caribbean, he describes with care

The modern period consists of the three centuries between the religious revolution at the beginning of the sixteenth century (Protestantism) and the French Revolution and its consequences. At the beginning of the sixteenth century the order was on the way to a genuine renaissance when the Revolutionary upheavals occurred. The progress of heresy cost it six or seven provinces and several hundreds of convents, but the discovery of the New World opened up a fresh field of activity. Its gains in America and those which arose as a consequence of the Portuguese conquests in Africa and the Indies far exceeded the losses of the order in Europe, and the seventeenth century saw its highest numerical development. The sixteenth century was a great doctrinal century, and the movement lasted beyond the middle of the eighteenth century. In modern times the order lost much of its influence on the political powers, which had universally fallen into absolutism and had little sympathy for the democratic constitution of the Preachers. The Bourbon courts of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were particularly unfavourable to them until the suppression of the Society of Jesus. In the eighteenth century, there were numerous attempts at reform which created, especially in France, geographical confusion in the administration. Also during the eighteenth century, the tyrannical spirit of the European powers and, still more, the spirit of the age lessened the number of recruits and the fervour of religious life. The French Revolution ruined the order in France, and the crises which more or less rapidly followed considerably lessened or wholly destroyed numerous provinces. Image File history File links Bartolomedelascasas. ... Image File history File links Bartolomedelascasas. ... Bartolomé de las Casas This article is about a Spanish priest in the 16th century. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Native Americans redirects here. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... This article is about an abbey as a religious building. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and Southeast Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Maldives... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The term absolutism can mean: A belief in absolute truth moral absolutism, the belief that there is some absolute standard of right and wrong political absolutism, a political system where one person holds absolute power, also called apolytarchy from Gr. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ...


Contemporary Period

Spanish Mendicant friars from the Order of Preachers at Saint Thomas Aquinas' School, Caracas, Venezuela, 1952
Spanish Mendicant friars from the Order of Preachers at Saint Thomas Aquinas' School, Caracas, Venezuela, 1952

The contemporary period of the history of the Preachers begins with the different restorations of provinces undertaken after the revolutions which had destroyed the Order in several countries of the Old World and the New. This period begins more or less in the early nineteenth century, and cannot be traced down to the present day without naming religious who are still living and whose activity embodies the present life of the Order. The revolutions not having totally destroyed certain of the provinces, nor decimated them, simultaneously, the Preachers were able to take up the laborious work of restoration in countries where the civil legislation did not present insurmountable obstacles. During this critical period the number of Preachers seems never to have sunk below 3,500. The statistics for 1876 give 3,748 religious, but 500 of these had been expelled from their convents and were engaged in parochial work. The statistics for 1910 give a total of 4,472 religious both nominally and actually engaged in the proper activities of the Order. They were distributed in twenty-eight provinces and five congregations, and possessed nearly 400 convents or secondary establishments. Image File history File links OP_Caracas. ... Image File history File links OP_Caracas. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century &#8212; 19th century &#8212; 20th century &#8212; more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the revival movement France held a foremost place, owing to the reputation and convincing power of the orator, Jean-Baptiste Henri Lacordaire (1802-1861). He took the habit of a Friar Preacher at Rome (1839), and the province of France was canonically erected in 1850. From this province were detached the province of Lyon, called Occitania (1862), that of Toulouse (1869), and that of Canada (1909). The French restoration likewise furnished many labourers to other provinces, to assist in their organization and progress. From it came the master general who remained longest at the head of the administration during the nineteenth century, Père Vincent Jandel (1850-1872). Here should be mentioned the province of St. Joseph in the United States. Founded in 1805 by Father Edward Fenwick, afterwards first Bishop of Cincinnati, Ohio (1821-1832), this province has developed slowly, but now ranks among the most flourishing and active provinces of the order. In 1910 it numbered seventeen convents or secondary houses. In 1905, it established a large house of studies at Washington, D.C., called the Dominican House of Studies. Portrait of Henri Jean-Baptiste Henri Lacordaire, father Henri-Dominique Lacordaire, born 12 May 1802 at Recey-sur-Ource (Côte-dOr), died 21 November 1861 à Sorèze (Tarn), was a French ecclesiastic, preacher, journalist and poltical activist. ... This article is about the French city. ... New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics Land... Master general or Master-general can refer to: the Superior general of certain orders and congregations, such as the Crosiers the Dominicans the Order of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mercy the Order of Saint Lazarus the Society of the Holy Cross the Trinitarian Order certain secular titles and offices... Alexandre Vincent Jandel (born at Gerbéviller, Lorraine, 18 July 1810; died at Rome, 11 December 1872) was a French Dominican, who became Master of the Order of Preachers. ... Bishop Edward Dominic Fenwick, O.P. (b. ... “Cincinnati” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Dominican House of Studies is a Priory of the Province of St. ...


The province of France (Paris) has produced a large number of preachers, several of whom became renowned. The conferences of Notre-Dame-de-Paris were inaugurated by Père Lacordaire. The Dominicans of the province of France furnished most of the orators: Lacordaire (1835-1836, 1843-1851), Jacques Monsabré (1869-1870, 1872-1890), Joseph Ollivier (1871, 1897), Thomas Etourneau (1898-1902). Since 1903 the pulpit of Notre Dame has again been occupied by a Dominican. Père Henri Didon (d. 1900) was one of the most esteemed orators of his time. The province of France displays greater intellectual and scientific activity than ever, the chief centre being the house of studies presently situated at Kain, near Tournai, Belgium, where are published L'Année Dominicaine (founded 1859), La Revue des Sciences Philosophiques et Theologiques (1907), and La Revue de la Jeunesse (1909). This article needs to be wikified. ... Kain may refer to: Kain may be used as an alternate spelling for Cain. ... Tournai (in Dutch: Doornik in Latin: Tornacum) is a municipality located 85 kilometres southwest of Brussels, on the river Scheldt (in French: Escaut, in Dutch: Schelde), in the Belgian province of Hainaut. ...


French Dominicans founded and administer the École Biblique et Archéologique française de Jérusalem ["French Biblical and Archæological School of Jerusalem"] founded in 1890 by Père Marie-Joseph Lagrange O.P. (1855-1938), one of the leading international centres for Biblical research of all kinds. It is at the École Biblique that the famed Jerusalem Bible (both editions) was prepared. Marie-Joseph Lagrange (7 March 1855 - 10 March 1938; earlier Albert Marie-Henri Lagrange) was a Catholic priest in the Dominican Order and founder of the École biblique in Jerusalem. ... | image= | translation_title=The New Jerusalem Bible| full_name=The New Jerusalem Bible | abbreviation=NJB | complete_bible_published=1966 | textual_basis= | translation_type=Roman Catholic | copyright=Copyright 1966 Darton, Longman & Todd | genesis_1:1-3=In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. ...


Likewise Yves Cardinal Congar, O.P., one of the emblematic theologians of the Twentieth Century, was a product of the French province of the Order of Preachers. Yves Marie Joseph Cardinal Congar (April 8, 1904-June 22, 1995) was a French Dominican priest and theologian. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ...


The province of the Philippines, the most populous in the order, is recruited from Spain, where it has several preparatory houses. In the Philippines it has charge of the University of Santo Tomas -- the Pontifical and the Royal university under the Spanish colonial government for nearly three centuries. For nearly half a century, it was the oldest university under the flag of the United States which later occupied the Philippines. The Order also has several colleges including the Colegio de San Juan de Letran, and six establishments. In China it administers the missions of North and South Fo-Kien, in the Japanese Empire, those of Formosa (now Taiwan) and Shikoku, besides establishments at New Orleans, at Caracas, and at Rome. The province of Spain has seventeen establishments in the Peninsula and the Canaries, as well as the missions of Urubamba, Peru. Since 1910 it has published at Madrid an important review, La Ciencia Tomista. The province of the Netherlands has a score of establishments, and the missions of Curaçao and Puerto Rico. Other provinces also have their missions. That of Piedmont has establishments at Constantinople and Smyrna; that of Toulouse, in Brazil; that of Lyon, in Cuba, that of Ireland, in Australia and Trinidad and Tobago; that of Belgium, in the Belgian Congo (now Democratic Republic of the Congo), and so on. The Pontifical and Royal University of Santo Tomas, The Catholic University of the Philippines (or simply the University of Santo Tomas, UST or affectionately, Ustê), is a private Roman Catholic university run by the Order of Preachers in Manila. ... Colegio de San Juan de Letran (CSJL) (also as San Juan de Letran College (SJLC), Letran College (LC) or simply Letran), was founded in 1620. ... This article is about the history, geography, and people of the island known as Taiwan. ... This article is about the island. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Nickname: La Sultana del Avila (English:The Avilas Sultan) La Sucursal del paraiso Motto: Ave María Santísima, sin pecado concebida, en el primer instante de su ser natural. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Missing image image:ccaa-canary. ... Urubamba which means Flat land of Spiders in Quechua is a small town in Peru, located near the Urubamba River. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... For other uses, see Curaçao (disambiguation). ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... Ä°zmir, historically Smyrna, is the third most populous city of Turkey and the countrys largest port after Ä°stanbul. ...

Dominican in habit
Dominican in habit

Doctrinal development has had an important place in the restoration of the Preachers. Several institutions besides those already mentioned have played important parts. Such is the Biblical school at Jerusalem, open to the religious of the Order and to secular clerics, and which publishes the Revue Biblique. The faculty of theology of the University of Freiburg, confided to the care of the Dominicans in 1890, is flourishing and has about 250 students. The Collegium Angelicum, established at Rome (1911) by Hyacinth Cormier (master general from 1902), is open to regulars and seculars for the study of the sacred sciences. To the reviews mentioned above must be added the Revue Thomiste, founded by Père Thomas Coconnier (d. 1908), and the Analecta Ordinis Prædicatorum (1893). Among the numerous writers of the order in this period are: Cardinals Thomas Zigliara (d. 1893) and Zephirin González (d. 1894), two esteemed philosophers; Father Alberto Guillelmotti (d. 1893), historian of the Pontifical Navy, and Father Heinrich Denifle, one of the most famous writers on medieval history (d. 1905). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x1280, 469 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dominican Order Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x1280, 469 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dominican Order Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg was founded 1457 in Freiburg by the Habsburgs. ... Tommaso Maria Zigliara (baptismal name: Francesco) (end of October, 1833 - 11 May 1893) was a Roman Catholic cardinal, theologian, and philosopher. ... Henry Denifle, in German Heinrich Seuse Denifle (January 16, 1844, Imst, Austrian Tyrol - June 10, 1905, Munich), was an Austrian paleographer and historian. ...


In 1910 the order had twenty archbishops or bishops, one of whom, Andreas Frühwirth, formerly master general (1892-1902), was Apostolic nuncio at Munich (Sanvito, Catalogus omnium provinciarum sacri ordinis praedicato. Karl-Josef Rauber; Nuncio for Belgium Nuncio is an ecclesiastical diplomatic title, derived from the ancient Latin Nuntius, meaning any envoy. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ...


Recent developments in the Philippine Province


On September 11, 2007, the University of Santo Tomas (UST) announced the appointment of Fr. Rolando V. De La Rosa, O.P. as acting rector, following a directive from the head of the Dominican Order based in Rome for a “new leadership team." The Master of the Order, Fr. Carlos A. Aspiroz Costa, O.P., in a canonical visit to the province, earlier asked the prior provincial of the Philippine Dominican Province, Fr. Edmund Nantes, O.P., who is also UST vice chancellor; Rector Fr. Ernesto Arceo, O.P.; and Vice Rector Fr. Juan Ponce, O.P. to resign over disagreements on how to proceed with developments in the university and the UST Hospital. Azpiroz serves as grand chancellor of Asia's oldest university.


A September 11 circular indicated that a plan to convert UST Hospital into a commercial operation had been stopped for review. UST Secretary-General Fr. Isidro Abaño, O.P. stated: “The Master believes that a new leadership team will be better able to create the consensus necessary for future developments at the University and Hospital, especially as UST begins preparations for its 400th anniversary in 2011."


The circular said Fr. Quirico Pedregosa, O.P. had been named vicar over the University and was asked to “remain in the office for the foreseeable future.” Fr. Pedregosa is the master’s assistant for Asia-Pacific and had served as prior provincial of the Philippine Dominican Province.


The country’s premiere university hospital, which separated from the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery in 2004, was to embark on a P3-billion expansion program involving the construction of a 19-storey tower to house doctors’ clinics and other medical facilities. But now, the goal of the redevelopment is to ensure that UST will continue to offer the “highest educational standards in the formation of future doctors and allied medical practitioners and the highest level of medical care and services in both its Clinical and Pay divisions.”


Fr. De La Rosa was a two-term UST rector and former chairman of the Commission on Higher Education. [3]


Mottos

1. Laudare, Benedicere, Praedicare

To praise, to bless and to preach

(from the Dominican Missal, Preface of the Blessed Virgin Mary)


2. Veritas

Truth

3. Contemplare et Contemplata Aliis Tradere

To study and to hand on the fruits of study (or, to contemplate and to hand on the fruits of contemplation)

List of Dominicans

See also: Category:Dominicans


Important Dominicans include:

Four Dominican cardinals have reached the Papacy: Innocent V, Benedict XI, Pius V and Benedict XIII. Saint Dominic (Spanish: Domingo), also known as Dominic of Osma, often called Dominic de Guzmán and Domingo de Guzmán Garcés (1170 – August 6, 1221) was the founder of the Friars Preachers, popularly called the Dominicans or Order of Preachers (OP), a Catholic religious order. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... Albertus Magnus (fresco, 1352, Treviso, Italy) Albertus Magnus (1193? - 1280), also known as Saint Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, was a Dominican friar who became famous for his universal knowledge and advocacy for the peaceful coexistence of science and religion. ... Saint Catherine of Siena (March 25, 1347 - April 29, 1380) was a Dominican Tertiary (lay affiliate) of the Dominican Order. ... 02:41, 25 November 2006 (UTC)24. ... Saint Rose of Lima, (20 April 1586 - 24 August 1617), the first Catholic saint of The Americas, was born in Lima, Peru. ... St. ... Pope St. ... Fresco of Jordan in the convent at Worms. ... Bartolomé de las Casas This article is about a Spanish priest in the 16th century. ... Grand Inquisitor Tomás de Torquemada “Torquemada” redirects here. ... Giordano Bruno Giordano Bruno (1548, Nola – February 17, 1600, Rome) was an Italian philosopher, priest, cosmologist, and occultist. ... Henry Suso (Also called Amandus, a name adopted in his writings, and Heinrich Seuse in German) was a German mystic, born at Überlingen on Lake Constance on March 21, circa 1300; he died at Ulm, January 25, 1366; declared Blessed in 1831 by Gregory XVI, who assigned his feast in... Johannes Tauler (c. ... Bernard Gui (1261 or 1262 – 30 December 1331 Laroux), also known as Bernardo Gui or Bernardus Guidonis, was an inquisitor of the Dominican Order in the Late Middle Ages during the Medieval Inquisition, Bishop of Lodève, and one of the most prolific writers of the Middle Ages. ... Andrew of Longjumeau (also Longumeau, Lonjumel, etc. ... A young Fr. ... Girolamo Savonarola by Fra Bartolomeo, c. ... Nikolaus Cardinal von Schönberg (born 11 August 1472 in Roth-Schönberg near Meissen, Saxony/Germany, died 7 September 1537 in Capua, Italy) was an Archbishop of Capua. ... Bishop Edward Dominic Fenwick, O.P. (b. ... John Bromyard (d. ... Nicolau Aymerich, b. ... The Meister Eckhart portal of the Erfurt Church. ... Portrait of Henri Jean-Baptiste Henri Lacordaire, father Henri-Dominique Lacordaire, born 12 May 1802 at Recey-sur-Ource (Côte-dOr), died 21 November 1861 à Sorèze (Tarn), was a French ecclesiastic, preacher, journalist and poltical activist. ... Reverend Dr Timothy Radcliffe OP was born in 1945 in London and is a Catholic priest and Dominican friar of the English Province, and former Master of the Order of Preachers (Dominicans) from 1992-2001. ... Felix Faber was a Dominican theologian and provincial of his order in Germany. ... Joseph Sadoc Alemany y Concill, O.P. (3 July 1814 - 14 April 1888) was an American (Spanish-born) Roman Catholic archbishop and missionary. ... Albert Nolan OP (born 1934) is a Roman Catholic priest and member of the Dominican order in South Africa. ... Fr. ... Herbert McCabe (1926-2001) was a Dominican priest, theologian and philosopher. ... Yves Marie Joseph Cardinal Congar (April 8, 1904-June 22, 1995) was a French Dominican priest and theologian. ... Rev. ... This page refers to a college in Rhode Island. ... William Everson (September 10, 1912 – June 3, 1994), also known as Brother Antoninus, was an American poet of the Beat generation and was also an author, literary critic and small press printer. ... Edward Schillebeeckx (Antwerp, November 12, 1914 -) is a Belgian theologian. ... Père Marie-Alain Couturier, known as Father Couturier (November 15, 1897-Februari 9, 1954) was a Dominican friar, designer of stained glass windows, famous for his modern inspiration of Sacred art. ... Martin of Opava, also known as Martin of Poland, was an important Dominican chronicler of the 13th century. ... Cosmos Rossellius (died 1578was a florentine Dominican monk whoe wrote a book about memory. ... Bishop Thomas is the first known Bishop of Finland. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... Pope Innocent V (c. ... Pope Benedict XI (1240 – July 7, 1304), born Nicholas Boccasini, was Pope from 1303 to 1304 Born in Treviso, he succeeded Pope Boniface VIII (1294–1303), but was unable to carry out his policies. ... Bold textHe was born as Antonio Ghislieri at Bosco in the duchy of Milan. ... Pope Benedict XIII (February 2, 1649 – February 21, 1730), born Pietro Francesco Orsini, later Vincenzo Maria Orsini, was pope from 1724 until his death. ...


Currently, in the College of Cardinals there are two Dominican cardinals: Christoph Cardinal Schönborn, Archbishop of Vienna and Georges Marie Martin Cardinal Cottier. The Sacred College of Cardinals is the body of all Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church established by Pope St. ... His Eminence Christoph Cardinal Schönborn, OP, Th. ... Wien is the German language name for Vienna, the city and federal state in Austria. ... Georges Marie Martin Cardinal Cottier (born April 25, 1922) is a Dominican, Cardinal and Swiss theologian. ...


Dominican Sisters

As well as the friars, Dominican sisters , also known as the Order of Preachers, live their lives supported by four common values, often referred to as the Four Pillars of Dominican Life, they are: community life, common prayer, study and service. St. Dominic called this fourfold pattern of life the "holy preaching." Henri Matisse was so moved by the care that he received from the Dominican Sisters that he collaborated in the design and interior decoration of their Chapelle du Saint-Marie du Rosaire in Vence, France. As well as the friars, Dominican sisters , also known as the Order of Preachers, live their lives supported by four common values, often referred to as the Four Pillars of Dominican Life, they are: community life, common prayer, study, and service. ... As well as the friars, Dominican sisters , also known as the Order of Preachers, live their lives supported by four common values, often referred to as the Four Pillars of Dominican Life, they are: community life, common prayer, study, and service. ... The Chapelle du Saint-Marie du Rosaire (Chapel of Our Lady of the Rosary), often referred to as the Matisse Chapel or the Vence Chapel is a small chapel built for Dominican nuns. ... Vence is a small French town and commune set in the hills of the Alpes Maritimes département, between Nice and Antibes. ...


Scholarly interpretation

Some scholars, including Lester K. Little, in his book on religious poverty in the Middle Ages, have argued that the Dominicans and other mendicant orders were an adaptation to the rise of the profit economy in medieval Europe.


Aquinas and the Sacraments

For a discussion of St. Thomas Aquinas and the Sacraments, go to Aquinas and the Sacraments. // The following atricle is a condensation of the writings of St. ...


Views of Aquinas

For the views of St. Thomas Aquinas on the death penalty, usury, forced baptism of the children of Jews and heretics and existentialism, go to Thought of Thomas Aquinas Part I This article contains selected thoughts of Thomas Aquinas on various topics. ...


See also

// The following atricle is a condensation of the writings of St. ... This article contains selected thoughts of Thomas Aquinas on various topics. ... The Third Order of St. ... Catholic Order Rites are liturgical rites, in the sense of variations on the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church, specific to a number of regular orders. ... The Latin Rite is one of the 23 sui iuris particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ... The Chinese Rites controversy was a dispute within the Roman Catholic Church in the early 18th century about whether Chinese folk religion rites and offerings to the emperor constituted idolatry or not. ... The Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament is an enclosed Roman Catholic religous order for men and women and a reform of the Dominican Order devoted to the perpetual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. ... Sainte Marie de La Tourette is a Dominican monastery in a valley near Lyon, France designed by the architect Le Corbusier and constructed between 1956 and 1960. ... Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, who chose to be known as Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965), was a Swiss-born architect and writer, who is famous for his contributions to what now is called Modern Architecture. ...

References

  1. ^ friar. Merriam Webster. Retrieved on 2007-06-23.
  2. ^ Morgan, Kenneth O. (Ed.) (1993). The Oxford History of Britain. Oxford University Press, p. 179. ISBN 0-19-285202-7. 
  3. ^ Varsitarian

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Dominican-founded schools

Newbridge College is a co-educational secondary school in Newbridge, County Kildare, Ireland, run by the Dominican Order. ...

Other

  • Dominican Life USA online news magazine
  • Dominican Preaching Online
  • Order of Preachers - Catholic Encyclopedia article
  • Philately of Dominican Order

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dominican Order (195 words)
The Dominican Order, (its formal name, the Order of Preachers, is less common in English) founded by Saint Dominic in the early 13th century, is one of the great mendicant orders[?] of friars that revolutionized religious life in Europe during the high middle ages.
Dominic sought to establish a new kind of order, one that would bring the dedication and systematic education of the older monastic orders like the Benedictines to bear on the religious problems of the burgeoning population of cities, but with more organizational flexibility than either monastic orders or the secular clergy.
His new order was to be a preaching order, trained to preach in the vernacular languages but with a sound background in academic theology.
Dominicans, Black Friars (1323 words)
The necessity for such an order had become apparent to Dominic during his early attempts, about 1205, to convert the Albigenses; it was at that time that he resolved to devote his life to the evangelization of the heretical and the uneducated.
In the later Middle Ages the order was equaled in influence only by the Franciscans, the two orders sharing much power in the church and often in the Roman Catholic states and arousing frequent hostility on the part of the parochial clergy, whose rights often seemed to be invaded by the friars.
An order of Dominican nuns was founded by Dominic in 1205, before the male branch of the order was established.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m