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Encyclopedia > Dome of the Rock
The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount
The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount

The Dome of the Rock, (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit.: Masjid Qubbat As-Sakhrah, Hebrew: כיפת הסלע, translit.: Kipat Hasela, Turkish: Kubbetüs Sahra), is an Islamic shrine and a major landmark located on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. It was completed in 691 making it the oldest extant Islamic building in the world.[1] Arabic redirects here. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Temple Mount A reconstruction of Herods Temple in Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Events The building of the Dome of the Rock is completed People Theuderic III succeeded by Clovis III Wilfrid, Bishop of Northumbria, expelled to Mercia See also Unterseeboot 691 Categories: 691 ...

Contents

Location, construction and dimensions

The Dome of the Rock is located at the visual center of an ancient man-made platform known as the Temple Mount to the Jews and the Haram al-Sharif (Noble Sanctuary) to the Muslims. The platform, greatly enlarged under the rule of Herod the Great, was the former site of the Second Jewish Temple which was destroyed during the Roman Siege of Jerusalem in 70 AD. In 637 AD Jerusalem was conquered by the Rashidun Caliphate army during the Islamic invasion of the Byzantine Empire. The Temple Mount A reconstruction of Herods Temple in Jerusalem. ... Herod the Great. ... A stone (2. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Judea Commanders Titus Flavius Vespasianus Simon Bar-Giora Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala) Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000 men 13,000 men, split among three factions Casualties Unknown 60,000–1,100,000 (mass civilian casualties) The Siege of Jerusalem in the... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... The Rashidun Caliphate Army or Rashidun army was the primary military body of the Rashidun Caliphates armed forces of 7th century, serving alongside the Rashidun caliphate Navy. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Muslim Arabs (Rashidun and Umayyad Caliphates) The Age of the Caliphs The Muslim conquest of Syria occured in the first half of the 7th century. ...


The Dome of the Rock was erected between 685 and 691 AD. The names of the two engineers in charge of the project are given as Yazid ibn Salam from Jerusalem and Raja ibn Haywah from Baysan. Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan who initiated construction of the Dome, hoped that it would “house the Muslims from cold and heat” [2], and intending the building to serve as a shrine for pilgrims and not as a mosque for public worship. [3] Historians contend that the Caliph wished to create a structure which would compete with the existing buildings of other religions in the city. al-Maqdisi writes that he Raja Ibn Haywah al-Kindi was a leading Islamic jurist and Arabic calligraphist who is probably best known as the likely artist responsible for the detailed inscriptions on the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, which was completed in 692. ... The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (646 - 705) was an Umayyad caliph. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ...

”sought to build for the Muslims a masjid that should be unique and a wonder to the world. And in like manner, is it not evident that Caliph Abd al-Malik, seeing the greatness of the martyrium of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and its magnificence was moved lest it should dazzle the minds of Muslims and hence erected above the Rock the dome which is now seen there.” [4]

Print from 1887. (Architect Frederick Catherwood was the first westerner known to have made detailed drawings of the Dome of the Rock, which he accomplished during a six-week period in 1833)
Print from 1887. (Architect Frederick Catherwood was the first westerner known to have made detailed drawings of the Dome of the Rock, which he accomplished during a six-week period in 1833)[5]

Prof. Shlomo Dov Goitein of the Hebrew University states that the Dome of the Rock was intended to remove the fitna, or 'annoyance,' constituted by the existence of the many fine buildings of worship of other religions. The very form of a rotunda, given to the Qubbat as-Sakhra, although it was foreign to Islam, was destined to rival the many Christian domes. [6] A.C. Cresswell in his book Origin of the plan of the Dome of the Rock notes that those who built the shrine made use of the measurements of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The diameter of the dome of the shrine is 20m 20cm and its height 20m 48cm, while the diameter of the dome of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is 20m 90cm and its height 21m 5cm. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3935x2923, 2338 KB) Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3935x2923, 2338 KB) Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Shelomo Dov Fritz/Friedrich Goitein (April 3, 1900 — February 6, 1985) was an Arabist, historian, Jewish ethnographer, famous for his expositions of Jewish life in the Islamic Middle Ages, based on the analysis of thousands of Geniza documents, in particular, for his monumental 5-volume work A Mediterranean Society. ... The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים) is one of Israels biggest and most important institutes of higher learning and research. ... This article is about the church building in Jerusalem. ...


The structure is basically octagonal. It comprises a wooden dome, approximately 60 feet (20 m) in diameter, which is mounted on an elevated drum consisting of a circle of 16 piers and columns. [3] Surrounding this circle is an octagonal arcade of 24 piers and columns. During his travels in Jerusalem, Mark Twain wrote that: Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ...

”Every where about the Mosque of Omar are portions of pillars, curiously wrought altars, and fragments of elegantly carved marble - precious remains of Solomon's Temple. These have been dug from all depths in the soil and rubbish of Mount Moriah, and the Moslems have always shown a disposition to preserve them with the utmost care.”[7] For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... Solomons Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Beit HaMikdash), also known as the First Temple, was, according to the Bible, the first Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ...

Exterior detail
Exterior detail

The outer side walls are made of porcelain [8] and mirror the octagonal design. They each measure approximately 60 feet (18 m) wide and 36 feet (11 m) high. Both the dome and the exterior walls contain many windows.[3] Download high resolution version (1024x681, 250 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1024x681, 250 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... “Fine China” redirects here. ...


The Dome

Exterior

The Dome is in the shape of a Byzantine martyrium, a structure intended for the housing and veneration of saintly relics, and is an excellent example of middle Byzantine art. al-Maqdisi reports that surplus funds consisting of 100,000 gold dinar coins were melted down and cast on the dome's exterior, “which at the time had a strong glitter that no eye could look straight at it.” [9] During the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent the exterior of the Dome of the Rock was covered with Iznik tiles. The work took seven years. Haj Amin Al-Husseini, appointed Grand Mufti by the British, along with Yacoub Al Ghussein implemented restoration of Dome of the Rock and Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. He had the Dome gold-plated for the first time. Suleiman I (Ottoman Turkish: Sulaymān, Turkish: ; formally Kanuni Sultan Süleyman in Turkish) (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566), was the tenth and longest‐serving Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, reigning from 1520 to 1566. ... Iznik dish in saz and rosette style in the British Museums collection Ä°znik pottery, named after the town in western Anatolia where it was made, is highly decorated ceramics whose heyday was the late sixteenth century. ... Mohammad Amin al-Husayni Mohammad Amin al-Husayni (ca. ...


In 1955 an extensive program of renovation was begun by the government of Jordan, with funds supplied by the Arab governments and Turkey. The work included replacement of large numbers of tiles dating back to the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent, which had become dislodged by heavy rain. In 1960, as part of this restoration, the dome was covered with a durable aluminium and bronze alloy made in Italy. The restoration was completed in August 1964. In 1998 the golden dome covering was refurbished following a donation of $8.2 million by King Hussein of Jordan who sold one of his houses in London to fund the 80 kilograms of gold required. For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Suleiman I (Ottoman Turkish: Sulaymān, Turkish: ; formally Kanuni Sultan Süleyman in Turkish) (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566), was the tenth and longest‐serving Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, reigning from 1520 to 1566. ... Aluminum redirects here. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... An alloy is a homogeneous hybrid of two or more elements, at least one of which is a metal, and where the resulting material has metallic properties. ... Hussein bin Talal (Arabic: حسين بن طلال) (November 14, 1935 - February 7, 1999) was the King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan from 1952 to 1999. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

Interior

The interior of the dome is lavishly decorated with mosaic, faience and marble, much of which was added several centuries after its completion. It also contains Qur'anic inscriptions. sura Ya-Seen is inscribed across the top of the tile work and was commissioned in the 16th century by Suleiman the Magnificent. al-Isra is inscribed above this. This article is about a decorative art. ... Faience or faïence is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed earthenware on a delicate pale buff body. ... For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... Sura (sometimes spelt Surah , plural Suwar ) is an Arabic term literally meaning something enclosed or surrounded by a fence or wall. ... Surat Ya-Seen (Arabic: سورة يس ) (Ya-Seen) is the 36th sura of the Quran with 83 ayat. ... Suleiman I (Ottoman Turkish: Sulaymān, Turkish: ; formally Kanuni Sultan Süleyman in Turkish) (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566), was the tenth and longest‐serving Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, reigning from 1520 to 1566. ... Surat Al-Isra (Arabic: سورة الإسراء ) (ie The Night Journey) is the 17th sura of the Quran . ...


According to Prof. Shlomo Dov Goitein, the inscriptions decorating the interior clearly display a spirit of polemic against Christianity, while stressing at the same time the Qur'anic doctrine that Jesus Christ was a true prophet. The formula la sharika lahu 'God has no companion' is repeated five times, the verses from sura Maryam 16:34-37, which strongly deny Jesus' sonship to God, are quoted together with the remarkable prayer: Allahumma salli (with ya; read salli without ya) ala rasulika wa'abdika 'Isa bin Maryam - "In the name of the One God (Allah) Pray for your Prophet and Servant Jesus son of Mary". He believes that this shows that rivalry with Christendom, together with the spirit of Islamic mission to the Christians, was at the work at the creation of the famous Dome. [6] Shelomo Dov Fritz/Friedrich Goitein (April 3, 1900 — February 6, 1985) was an Arabist, historian, Jewish ethnographer, famous for his expositions of Jewish life in the Islamic Middle Ages, based on the analysis of thousands of Geniza documents, in particular, for his monumental 5-volume work A Mediterranean Society. ... Maryam or Mariam in Arabic and Persian is the Islamic name for Mary the mother of Jesus (Arabic Isa) in the Quran. ...


History

The Dome of the Rock featured on the Palestine Mandate banknote
The Dome of the Rock featured on the Palestine Mandate banknote

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

Crusaders

During the Crusades the Dome of the Rock was given to the Augustinians, who turned it into a church, and the Al-Aqsa Mosque became the royal palace of Baldwin I of Jerusalem in 1104. The Knights Templar, who believed the Dome of the Rock was the site of the Temple of Solomon, set up their headquarters in the Al-Aqsa Mosque adjacent to the Dome for much of the 12th century. The "Templum Domini," as they called it, was featured on the official seals of the Order's Grand Masters (such as Evrard de Barres and Regnaud de Vichier), and it became the architectural model for Templar churches across Europe. This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Detail of St. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... Coronation of Baldwin I. (from: Histoire dOutremer, 13. ... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ... Solomons Temple was the first Jewish temple in Jerusalem which functioned as a religious focal point for worship and the sacrifices known as the korbanot in ancient Judaism. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Seals of the Knights Templars Officials of religious Orders had their own seals to validate documents approved by the Order. ... Everard des Barres (died 1174) was the third Grand Master of the Knights Templar from 1147 to 1151. ... Renaud de Vichiers was the 19th Grand Master of the Knights Templar, from 1250 to 1256. ...


Ayyubids and Mamluks

Jerusalem was recaptured by Saladin on Friday, 2 October 1187 and the Haram was reconsecrated as a Muslim sanctuary. The cross on top of the Dome of the Rock was replaced by a golden crescent and a wooden screen was placed around the rock below. Salah al-Din's nephew al-Malik al-Mu'azzam Isa (615-24/1218-27) carried out other restorations within the Haram and added the porch to the Aqsa mosque. Saladin, properly known as Salah al-DÄ«n Yusuf ibn Ayyub (Arabic: , Kurdish: ) (c. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 1 - Battle of Cresson - Saladin defeats the crusaders July 4 - Saladin defeats Guy of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, at the Battle of Hattin. ...


The Haram was the focus of extensive royal patronage by the sultans during the Mamluk period, which lasted from 1250 until 1510. Mamluk Flag Eastern Mediterranean 1450 Capital Cairo Language(s) Arabic, Kipchak Turkic[1] Religion Islam Government Monarchy [[Category:Former monarchies}}|Mamluk Sultanate, 1250]] History  - As-Salih Ayyubs death 1250  - Battle of Ridanieh 1517 Today part of  Egypt  Saudi Arabia  Syria  Palestine  Israel  Lebanon  Jordan  Turkey  Libya A Mamluk cavalryman...


Ottoman Empire 1517 - 1917

Dome of the Rock viewed through the Old City's Cotton Gate (Bab al-Qattanin)

Large-scale renovation was undertaken during the reign of Mahmud II in 1817. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (563 × 750 pixel, file size: 382 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo by Gila Brand, this is my own work. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (563 × 750 pixel, file size: 382 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo by Gila Brand, this is my own work. ... The Old City is a 0. ... The stylized signature of Mahmud II was written in an expressive calligraphy. ...


British Mandate 1917 - 1948

The Dome of the Rock was badly shaken during an earthquake in Palestine on Monday, 11 July 1927 rendering useless many of the repairs that had taken place over previous years. is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


1948 to present

Under Jordanian rule of Jerusalem, Jews were forbidden from entering the Old City. Israel took control of the Dome of Rock during its victory in the Six-Day War in 1967. According to a posthumously-published interview with Haaretz, General Uzi Narkiss reported that on June 7, 1967, a few hours after East Jerusalem fell into Israeli hands, Rabbi Shlomo Goren had told him "Now is the time to put 100 kilograms of explosives into the Mosque of Omar so that we may rid ourselves of it once and for all." His request was denied; according to Goren's aide Menahem Hacohen, he had not suggested blowing up the mosque, but had merely stated that "if, during the course of the war a bomb had fallen on the mosque and it would have – you know – disappeared – that would have been a good thing." Later that year, in a speech to a military convention, he added: "Certainly we should have blown it up. It is a tragedy for generations that we did not do so. […] I myself would have gone up there and wiped it off the ground completely so that there was no trace that there was ever a Mosque of Omar there."[10] Shlomo Goren also entered the Dome of the Rock with a Torah book and the shofar.[11] Map of the West Bank today Rule of the West Bank and East Jerusalem by Jordan. ... The Old City is a 0. ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ... Uzi Narkiss (Jerusalem, 1925 - Jerusalem, 1997), was an Israeli soldier and general, who served as commander of the Israel Defense Forces units in the Central Region during the Six Day War. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Shlomo Goren (1917-1994), was a former Orthodox Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi of Israel. ... Dome of the Rock in center of Temple Mount The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: قبة الصخرة Qubbat As-Sakhrah) is a famous Islamic shrine in Jerusalem. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... A shofar made from the horn of a kudu, in the Yemenite Jewish style. ...

Palestinian women after prayer at the Dome, with Arabic calligraphy decoration at the top

A few hours after the Israeli flag was hoisted over the Dome of the Rock in 1967, at the conclusion of the Six-Day War, Israelis lowered it on the orders of General Moshe Dayan, and invested the Muslim Waqf (religious trust) with the authority to manage the Temple Mount-Haram al-Sharif in order to "keep the peace".[12] Groups such as the Temple Mount and Eretz Yisrael Faithful Movement wish to relocate the Dome to Mecca and replace it with a Third Temple. Since Muslims consider the ground under the Dome to be sacred this would be a highly contentious move, and would provoke violence. The majority of Israelis also do not share the movement's wishes. Most religious Jews feel that the Temple should only be rebuilt in the messianic era, and it is their belief that it would be presumptuous of people to force God's hand. However, some Evangelical Christians consider this a prerequisite to Armageddon and the Second Coming. This view is steeped in the belief that their will a prophetic rebuilding of the Temple in place of the Dome of the Rock. Flag ratio: 8:11 The flag of Israel was adopted on October 28, 1948, five months after the nations independence. ... Moshe Dayan (‎, born 20 May 1915, died 16 October 1981) was an Israeli military leader and politician. ... This article is about the religious endowment. ... The Temple Mount and Eretz Yisrael (Land of Israel) Faithful Movement (followers are called the Temple Mount Faithful) is an Orthodox Jewish movement based in Israel that wishes to re-establish the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem and re-institute the practice of ritual sacrifice. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... A drawing of Ezekiels Visionary Temple from the Book of Ezekiel 40-47 Since the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, religious Jews have prayed that God will allow for the rebuilding of a Third Temple. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Messiah. ... // In the three Abrahamic Religions (Islam, Judaism, and Christianity), the End Times are depicted as a time of tribulation that precede the predicted coming of a Messiah figure. ... For other uses, see Second Coming (disambiguation). ...


Accessibility

Sign at visitors entrance to Temple Mount.
Sign at visitors entrance to Temple Mount.

It is formally owned and maintained by the Ministry of Awqaf in Jordan.[13] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (724x926, 259 KB) Sign near entrance to the Temple Mount in Jerusalem warning Jews against entering. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (724x926, 259 KB) Sign near entrance to the Temple Mount in Jerusalem warning Jews against entering. ...


Until the mid-nineteenth century, non-Muslims were barred from the area. Since 1967, non-Muslims have been allowed some entry, but non-Muslim prayers on the Temple Mount are not allowed.[14] Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon visited the Temple Mount in 2000, in what was considered by some a provocative gesture that set off Muslim rioting, non-Muslims were forbidden to enter the Temple compound.[15]   (Hebrew: , also known by his diminutive Arik אָרִיק) (born February 27, 1928) is a former Israeli politician and general. ...


In 2006, the compound was reopened to non-Muslim visitors free of charge, between 7:30-11:30 a.m. and 1:30-2:30 p.m. during Summer and 7:30-10:30 a.m. and 1:30-2:30 p.m. during Winter. Non-muslims may never enter on Fridays, Saturdays, or Muslim holidays. Entry is through a covered wooden walkway next to the security entrance to the Western Wall known as the Mugrabi or Maimonides Gate. Entry to the mosques themselves is prohibited to non-Muslims, as is access to the Temple Mount through the Cotton Market. Visitors undergo strict security screening, and items such as Hebrew prayerbooks or musical instruments are not allowed.


In addition to these restrictions put in place by the Muslim Council, most Orthodox rabbis regard entry to the compound as a violation of Jewish law. This restriction is based on the belief that even though the Temple was destroyed centuries ago, the precise location of the Holy of Holies, the sanctuary that was only entered by the High Priest, is not known. Hence the restriction is applied to the entire compound. However, some rabbis believe that modern archeological and other evidence have enabled them to identify areas that can be safely entered without violating Jewish law. [16] Muslim Council may refer to: American Muslim Council, an Islamic organization Muslim Council of Britain, an unincorporated association founded in 1997 Muslim American Public Affairs Council, an American-Muslim political and public advocacy group headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina Muslim Public Affairs Council, an American Muslim advocacy organization headquartered in... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ...


Religious significance

The Dome of the rock is among a complex of buildings (The other being the Al-Aqsa mosque) on what is considered the third holiest site in Islam. Image File history File links Emblem-contradict. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... Mecca, Medina and Jerusalem are generally recognized as the three most important cities in Islam according to interpretations of scriptures in the Quran and Hadith. ...

The Dome of the Rock illustrated Jewish religious works as early as the 16th century
The Dome of the Rock illustrated Jewish religious works as early as the 16th century

The Dome of the Rock is considered the second holiest site in Islam after the Kaaba at Mecca.[17] Its significance stems from the religious beliefs regarding the rock at it heart. According to Islamic tradition, the rock is the spot from where Muhammad ascended to Heaven accompanied by the angel Gabriel. In Judaism the location of the stone is venerated as the holiest spot on Earth, the site of the Holy of Holies during the Temple Period. In Christianity it is believed that during the time of the Byzantine Empire, the spot where the Dome was later constructed was where Constantine's mother built a small church, calling it the Church of St. Cyrus and St. John, later on enlarged and called the Church of the Holy Wisdom.[18] On the walls of the Dome of the Rock is an inscription in a mosaic frieze that includes the following words: The Kaaba (Arabic: ; IPA: ) , also known as (), ( The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. ... the Stone - south is towards the top of the image For the foundation-stone of a building, see Cornerstone. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... A 16th century Persian miniature painting celebrating Muhammads ascent into the Heavens, a journey known as the Miraj. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Byzantine redirects here. ... Look up Constantine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about a decorative art. ... Frieze of the Tower of the Winds. ...

"Bless your envoy and your servant Jesus son of Mary and peace upon him on the day of birth and on the day of death and on the day he is raised up again. It is a word of truth in which they doubt. It is not for God to take a son. Glory be to him when he decrees a thing he only says be and it is."[1]

This appears to be the earliest extant citation from the Qur'an, with the date recorded as 72 after the Hijra (or 691-692 AD), which historians view as the year of the Dome's construction.[1] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Hijra may refer to: Hijra (Hegira/Hijrah/Hejira) is an Arabic term referring to the migration of the Prophet Muhammad from Mecca to Medina in 622. ...

The dome of the rock in Jerusalem on the Temple Mount

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Dome of the Rock

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... the Stone - south is towards the top of the image For the foundation-stone of a building, see Cornerstone. ... The interior of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne. ... The Temple Mount A reconstruction of Herods Temple in Jerusalem. ... Well of Souls can mean several things: 1. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Rizwi Faizer (1998). The Shape of the Holy: Early Islamic Jerusalem. Rizwi's Bibliography for Medieval Islam.
  2. ^ Abu-Bakr al-Wasiti, Fada'il Bayt al-Maqdis, pp. 80-81, vol 136
  3. ^ a b c Encyclopædia Britannica: Dome of the Rock
  4. ^ Shams al-Din al-Maqdisi, Ahsan al-Taqasim fi Mar'rifat al-Aqalim, 2nd ed. (Leiden, 1967) pp. 159-171
  5. ^ "Drawings of Islamic Buildings: Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem." (html). Victoria and Albert Museum. “Until 1833 the Dome of the Rock had not been measured or drawn; according to Victor von Hagen, ‘no architect had ever sketched its architecture, no antiquarian had traced its interior design…’ On 13 November in that year, however, Frederick Catherwood dressed up as an Egyptian officer and accompanied by an Egyptian servant ‘of great courage and assurance’, entered the buildings of the mosque with his drawing materials … ‘During six weeks, I continued to investigate every part of the mosque and its precincts.’ Thus, Catherwood made the first complete survey of the Dome of the Rock, and paved the way for many other artists in subsequent years, such as William Harvey, Ernest Richmond and Carl Friedrich Heinrich Werner.”
  6. ^ a b Goitein, Shlomo Dov; The Historication background of the erection of the Dome of the Rock, Journal of American Oriental Society, Vol. 70, No. 2, 1950
  7. ^ Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad, Chapter LIV
  8. ^ Dome of the Rock, The. Glass Steel and Stone.
  9. ^ Abu-Bakr al-Wasiti, Fada'il Bayt al-Maqdis, pp. 80-81, vol 136
  10. ^ The Political Role Of The Israeli Chief Rabbinate In The Temple Mount Question by Yoel Cohen
  11. ^ Photo of Shlomo Goren inside the Dome
  12. ^ Letter from Jerusalem: A Fight Over Sacred Turf by Sandra Scham
  13. ^ Hashemite Restorations of the Islamic Holy Places in Jerusalem - kinghussein.gov.jo - Retrieved January 21, 2008
  14. ^ Jerusalem's Holy Places and the Peace Process Marshall J. Breger and Thomas A. Idinopulos
  15. ^ Eyewitness: Inside al-Aqsa (BBC) March 20, 2002
  16. ^ http://web.israelinsider.com/Articles/Politics/4839.html
  17. ^ Dome of the Rock as second holiest site in Islam:
    • "The Dome of the Rock, second only to the Kaaba at Mecca as a Muslim holy place." Encarta encyclopedia, Dome of the Rock
    • "Haram es-Sharif – Noble Sanctuary – is the religious centre of the Muslims of the Middle East and second only to Mecca in the Muslim World." (El Aref, Aref. A Brief Guide to The Dome of the Rock and Al-Haram Al-Sharif, The Supreme Awqaf Council, Jerusalem, 1962.)
    • "In 692 CE the Muslim Caliph Abd al-Malik constructed a magnificent shrine on the site of the temple, which is the second holiest point of pilgrimage in Islam." (Losch, Richard R. The Uttermost Part Of The Earth: A Guide To Places In The Bible, "Jerusalem", pg. 125. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2005. ISBN 0802828051)
    • "...the sacred rock in the mosque of ‘Omar, the second holiest site in all Islam..." (Cheyne, TK and Black, J Sutherland. Encyclopedia Biblica Vol IV, "The Temple", pg. 4927. The Macmillian Company, London, 1903.)
    • "...the Dome of the Rock, the second holiest place after Mecca for Moslems.” (El Khatib, Rouhi. (Mayor of East Jerusalem) Statement to the 1,421st meeting of the United Nations Security Council on May 3, 1968.
  18. ^ Wilkinson, Jerusalem Pilgrims Before the Crusades, page 204

HTML, an initialism of Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... Victor Wolfgang von Hagen (1908– ) was a US-American explorer, archaeological historian, anthropologist and travel writer who travelled the South Americas with his wife Christine. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... William Harvey (1796-1866) was an English engraver and designer. ... Shelomo Dov Fritz/Friedrich Goitein (April 3, 1900 — February 6, 1985) was an Arabist, historian, Jewish ethnographer, famous for his expositions of Jewish life in the Islamic Middle Ages, based on the analysis of thousands of Geniza documents, in particular, for his monumental 5-volume work A Mediterranean Society. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Innocents Abroad cover The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims Progress was published by American author Mark Twain in 1869. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Encarta is a digital multimedia encyclopedia published by Microsoft Corporation. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...

References

  • Peterson, Andrew (1994). Dictionary of Islamic Architecture. London: Routledge. ISBN 0-415-06084-2

External links

  • Dome of the Rock Sacred Destinations - includes photo tour
  • Dome of the Rock AutoCAD release 14, CAD drawing, 1995
  • Dome of the Rock Bible places
  • Dome of the Rock Interior picture
  • Dome of the Rock Sacred sites
  • Re-envisioning the Dome of the Rock The Hope
  • Dome of the Rock from Jerusalem photos portal
  • 16X zoomable panoramic view of Jerusalem from the Mount of Olives
  • Site surrounding the controversy over the excavations made by the Waqf
  • A vision for the Temple Mount
  • Photo Gallery of the Temple Mount and the Dome of the Rock


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dome of the Rock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1185 words)
The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: قبة الصخرة Qubbat As-Sakhrah) is a famous Islamic shrine in Jerusalem.
The Dome of the Rock was built for Caliph Abd al-Malik by Byzantine craftsmen from Constantinople sent to the Caliph by the Byzantine Emperor.
During the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent the exterior of the Dome of the Rock was covered with Iznik tiles.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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