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Encyclopedia > Dolly Parton
Dolly Parton
Dolly Parton in Nashville, Tennessee; 2005.
Dolly Parton in Nashville, Tennessee; 2005.
Background information
Birth name Dolly Rebecca Parton
Born January 19, 1946 (1946-01-19) (age 62)
Origin Sevierville, Tennessee, U.S.
Genre(s) Country, country pop, Bluegrass
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, actress, author, philanthropist
Instrument(s) Vocals, guitar, banjo, autoharp, piano
Years active 1964 – present
Label(s) Dolly Records
Goldband
Mercury
Somerset
Monument
RCA
Warner Bros.
Columbia
Rising Tide
Decca
Asylum
Sugar Hill
Associated acts Porter Wagoner
Kenny Rogers
James Ingram
Ricky Van Shelton
Emmylou Harris
Linda Ronstadt
Loretta Lynn
Tammy Wynette
Billy Ray Cyrus
Kathy Mattea
Brad Paisley
Richie Roccisano
Stella Parton
Website Dolly Parton Music

Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is a Grammy Award-winning country music singer/songwriter, author, actress and philanthropist. To date, she remains one of the most successful country artists, with 26 number-one singles (a record for a female performer) and 42 top-10 country albums (more than anyone else). is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sevierville (pronounced ) is a city in and the county seatGR6 of Sevier County , Tennessee, United States of America. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Country Pop is a subgenre of country music that first emerged in the 1970s, with roots in both the countrypolitan sound and in soft rock. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... An Autoharp The Autoharp is a musical string instrument having a series of chord bars attached to dampers which, when depressed, mute all the strings other than those that form the desired chord. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Goldband Records is an American record company based in Lake Charles, Louisiana, founded in 1945 and best known for its Cajun and R&B recordings in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Mercury Records is a record label currently headquartered in the UK, and is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Monument Records was a record label founded in 1958 by Fred Foster and Bob Moore. ... Nashville is one of the premier music recording centers in the world. ... Warner Bros. ... The Rising Tide is an album by Sunny Day Real Estate. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... Sugar Hill Records is a folk music label that was founded in 1978 by Barry Poss and was acquired by the Welk Music Group in 1998. ... Porter Wayne Wagoner (August 12, 1927 – October 28, 2007) was an American country music singer. ... Kenneth Ray[2] Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... James Ingram (born February 16, 1956 in Akron, Ohio) is an American soul musician, famous for his vocal performance. ... Ricky Van Shelton (born January 12, 1952 in Danville, Virginia) is a country singer best known for his songs Life Turned Her That Way, Ill Leave This World Loving You, and Ive Cried my Last Tear for You. ... Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947, Birmingham, Alabama) is a country, folk, alternative rock, and alternative country musician. ... Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American popular vocalist and entertainer who has earned multiple Grammy Awards, an Emmy Award, numerous certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, and Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. ... Loretta Lynn (born Loretta Webb April 14, 1934) is an American country singer-songwriter and was one of the leading country female vocalists during the 1960s and 1970s and overall is revered as a country icon. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was an American country singer and songwriter. ... Billy Ray Cyrus (born August 25, 1961) is an American country singer-songwriter and actor, best known for his hit single Achy Breaky Heart. A multi-platinum selling recording artist, he has one number one country single and seven top-ten singles. ... Kathy Mattea, full name Kathleen Alice Mattea (born June 21, 1959 in South Charleston, West Virginia), is a female country music and bluegrass performer who often brings celtic sounds to her music, particularly with her release of Love Travels, one of her most critically popular albums. ... Brad Douglas Paisley (born October 28, 1972 in Glen Dale, West Virginia) is an American country music singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Stella Parton (born May 4, 1949) is an American Country Music singer and songwriter. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ...


She is known for her distinctive mountain soprano, sometimes bawdy humor, flamboyant dress sense, and her voluptuous figure.

Contents

Early years

Childhood

Parton was born in Sevierville, Tennessee, the fourth of 12 children born to Robert Lee Parton and Avie Lee Owens. Her siblings are Willadeene Parton (a poet), David Parton, Denver Parton, Bobby Parton, Stella Parton (a singer), Cassie Parton, Larry Parton (who died shortly after birth), Randy Parton (a singer and businessman), twins Floyd Parton (a songwriter) and Freida Parton (a singer), and Rachel Dennison (an actress). Sevierville (pronounced ) is a city in and the county seatGR6 of Sevier County , Tennessee, United States of America. ... Stella Parton (born May 4, 1949) is an American Country Music singer and songwriter. ...


Her family was, as she described them, "dirt poor."[1] They lived in a rustic, dilapidated one-room cabin in Locust Ridge, a hamlet just north of Greenbrier in the Great Smoky Mountains of Sevier County, Tennessee. Parton's parents were parishioners in the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee), a Pentecostal denomination, and music was a very large part of her church experience. She once told an interviewer that her grandfather was a Pentecostal "holy roller" preacher [2]. Today, when appearing in live concerts, she frequently performs spiritual songs. (Parton, however, professes no denomination, claiming only to be "spiritual" while adding that she believes that all the Earth's people are God's children.) The Middle Fork of the Little Pigeon River in Greenbrier Greenbrier is a valley in the northern Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, located in the Southeastern United States. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachian Mountain system The Great Smoky Mountains are a major mountain range in the southern part of the Appalachian Mountains, the second ridge line forming a north-south running mountain chain from the Eastern United States and bordering the... Sevier County (pronounced severe) is a U.S. county of the state of Tennessee, United States. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Church of God (Cleveland) is... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... For other senses of this word, see denomination. ... Holy Roller is a term in American English used to describe Pentecostal Christian churchgoers. ...


On May 30, 1966, at the age of 21, she married Carl Dean in Ringgold, Georgia. She met Dean on her first day in Nashville, at age 18, at the Wishy-Washy Laundromat. His very first words to her were: "You're gonna get sunburnt out there, little lady." [3] Dean, who runs an asphalt-paving business in Nashville, has always shunned publicity and rarely accompanies her to any events. The couple have raised several of Dolly's younger siblings at their home in Nashville, leading her nieces and nephews to refer to her as "Aunt Granny." Dean and Parton have no children together. is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Ringgold is a city located in Catoosa County, Georgia. ...


Dolly is the godmother of singer and actress Miley Cyrus .[4][5] Miley Cyrus (born Destiny Hope Cyrus[1] on November 23, 1992 in Franklin, Tennessee) is an American actress and singer. ...


Career discovery

Parton began performing as a child, singing on local radio and television programs in East Tennessee. At age 9 she was appearing on The Cas Walker Show on WBIR-TV in Knoxville, Tennessee, and at 13, she was recording on a small record label, Goldband, and appearing at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee. It was that night at the Opry that she first met Johnny Cash, who encouraged her to go where her heart took her, and not to care what others thought. [6] The day after she graduated from high school in 1964 she moved to Nashville, taking many traditional elements of folklore and popular music from East Tennessee with her. East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... Orton Caswell Walker (1903-1998) better know as Cas Walker was a businessman, politician and television personality. ... WBIR-TV channel 10 is the NBC affiliate Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Knoxville redirects here. ... Goldband Records is an American record company based in Lake Charles, Louisiana, founded in 1945 and best known for its Cajun and R&B recordings in the 1950s and 1960s. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ...


Parton's initial success came as a songwriter, writing hit songs for Hank Williams, Jr. and Skeeter Davis. [7] She signed with Monument Records in late 1965, where she was initially pitched as a bubblegum pop singer, [8] earning only one national chart single, "Happy, Happy Birthday Baby," which did not crack the Billboard Hot 100. Additional pop singles also failed to chart including "Without Love" and "Damn". This article is about Hank Williams, Jr. ... Skeeter Davis (born Mary Frances Penick December 30, 1931 – September 19, 2004) was an American Country Music Singer, who was best known for crossover Pop music songs of the early 1960s. ... Monument Records was a record label founded in 1958 by Fred Foster and Bob Moore. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Bubblegum pop (bubblegum rock, bubblegum music, youth music, or simply bubblegum) is a genre of pop music. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ...


The label agreed to have Parton sing country music after her composition, "Put It Off Until Tomorrow," as recorded by Bill Phillips (and with Parton, uncredited, on harmony), went to No. 6 on the Country Charts in 1966. Her first country single, "Dumb Blonde" (one of the few songs during this era that she recorded but didn't write), reached No. 24 on the country charts in 1967, followed the same year with "Something Fishy," which went to Number 17. The two songs anchored her first full-length album,"Hello,I'm Dolly" Bill Phillips is the author of the best-selling popular fitness book Body-for-Life: 12 Weeks to Mental and Physical Strength and the founder of EAS Performance Nutrition. ...


Music career

1967 – 1976: Country music success

In 1967, Parton was asked to join the weekly syndicated country music TV program hosted by Porter Wagoner, replacing Norma Jean, who had returned to Oklahoma. Initially, Wagoner's audience was reluctant to warm to Parton and chanted for Norma Jean, but with Wagoner's assistance, she was accepted. Wagoner convinced his label, RCA, to also sign Parton. Since female performers were not particularly popular in the late '60s, the label decided to protect their investment by releasing her first single as a duet with Wagoner. The duo's first single, "The Last Thing on My Mind," reached the country Top Ten early in 1968, launching a six-year streak of virtually uninterrupted Top Ten singles. [9] Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Porter Wayne Wagoner (August 12, 1927 – October 28, 2007) was an American country music singer. ... Norma Jean Beasler (Pretty Miss Norma Jean), born January 30, 1938 in Wellston, Oklahoma, recorded and sang professionally simply as Norma Jean. She had her own radio show in Oklahoma as a teenager and first attracted national attention on Red Foleys Ozark Jubilee television series in 1958. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... The Last Thing on My Mind is a song written by Tom Paxton in the early 1960s, which Paxton first recorded in 1964. ...


Parton's first solo single, "Just Because I'm a Woman," was released in the summer of 1968 and was a moderate hit, reaching number 17. For the remainder of the decade, none of her solo efforts — even "In the Good Old Days (When Times Were Bad)," which would later become a standard — were as successful as her duets. The duo was named Vocal Group of the Year in 1968 by the Country Music Association, but Parton's solo records were continually ignored. Wagoner and Parton were both frustrated by her lack of solo success, because he had a significant financial stake in her future — as of 1969, he was her co-producer and owned nearly half of the publishing company Owepar. [10] Just Because Im a Woman: The Songs of Dolly Parton is a 2003 tribute album to Dolly Parton. ... The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


By 1970, both Parton and Wagoner had grown frustrated by her lack of solo success, and Porter had her sing Jimmie Rodgers' "Mule Skinner Blues," a gimmick that worked. The record shot to number three on the charts, followed closely by her first number one single, "Joshua." For the next two years, she had a number of solo hits — including her signature song "Coat of Many Colors" (number four, 1971) — in addition to her duets. Though she had successful singles, none of them were blockbusters until "Jolene" reached number one in early 1974. Parton stopped traveling with Wagoner after its release, yet she continued to appear on television and sing duets with him until 1976. [11] Jimmie Rodgers was the name of two singers: Jimmie Rodgers (country singer) Jimmie Rodgers (pop singer) Jimmie Rodgers (SPC Deputy Director General) Note that there was also a Jimmy Rogers (note the spelling), a blues singer born in 1924. ... Mule Skinner Blues (AKA Blue Yodel # 8) was a folk song cowritten by Jimmy Rodgers and George Vaughn in 1931. ... In the Hebrew Bible, the coat of many colors is the name for the (possibly) multicolored garment that Joseph owned. ...


She stayed with the Wagoner show and continued to record duets with him for seven years, then made a break to become a solo artist. In 1974, her song, "I Will Always Love You" (written about her break from Wagoner), was released and went to #1 on the country charts. Around the same time, Elvis Presley indicated that he wanted to cover the song. Parton was interested until Presley's manager, Colonel Tom Parker, told her that she would have to sign over half of the publishing rights if Presley recorded the song (as was the standard procedure for songs he recorded). [12]. Parton refused and that decision is credited with helping make her many millions of dollars in royalties from the song over the years. It was decisions like these, in fact, that caused her to be called "The Iron Butterfly" in showbiz circles. She also claims to have made over $6 million from Whitney Houston's cover version of this song.[13] I Will Always Love You is a song written and originally performed by American country singer-songwriter Dolly Parton (first released as a single in 1974) and then most famously recorded by American singer Whitney Houston. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Colonel Tom Parker (born Andreas Cornelius van Kuijk on June 26, 1909 – January 21, 1997), was an American/Dutch entertainment impresario known best as the manager of Elvis Presley. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Whitney Elizabeth Houston (born August 9, 1963) is a six-time Grammy award winning, American R&B singer, soprano, pianist, actress, film producer, and former model. ...


1977 – 1986: Branching out into Pop music

Parton later had commercial success as a pop singer, as well as an actress. Her 1977 album, Here You Come Again, was her first million-seller, and the title track ("Here You Come Again") became her first top-ten single on the pop charts (reaching No. 3); many of her subsequent singles charted on both pop and country charts, simultaneously. Her albums during this period were developed specifically for pop/crossover success. With less time to spend on her songwriting, as she focused on a burgeoning film career, the early 1980s found Parton recording a larger percentage of material from noted pop songwriters, such as Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, Rupert Holmes, Gary Portnoy, and Carole Bayer Sager. In 1978, Parton won the Grammy award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance for her Here You Come Again album. This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Here You Come Again was a 1977 single and album by Dolly Parton. ... Barry Mann (born Barry Iberman on February 9, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American songwriter, and part of one of the most prolific songwriting partnerships in the world of rock music. ... Cynthia Weil (born October 18, 1937 in New York City) is a prominent American songwriter. ... Rupert Holmes (born February 24, 1947 in Northwich, Cheshire, England) is a composer and writer who grew up in the northern New York City suburb of Nanuet, New York, and attended nearby Nyack High School. ... Gary Portnoy (born January 1, 1956) co-wrote and sang the Cheers theme, and the Punky Brewster theme. ... Carole Bayer Sager (born March 8, 1947 in New York City, New York) is an American lyricist, songwriter and singer best-known for writing the lyrics to many popular songs performed on Broadway and in Hollywood films. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance was first awarded in 1965. ...


From 1974 to 1980, she consistently charted in the country Top Ten, with no less than eight singles reaching number one. Parton had her own syndicated television show, Dolly, in 1976 and by the next year had gained the right to produce her own albums, which immediately resulted in diverse efforts like 1977's New Harvest...First Gathering. In addition to her own hits during the late '70s, many artists, from Rose Maddox and Kitty Wells to Olivia Newton-John, Emmylou Harris, and Linda Ronstadt, covered her songs, and her siblings Randy and Stella received recording contracts of their own. [14] Rose Maddox (August 15, 1926 in Boaz, Alabama - April 16, 1998 in Ashland, Oregon) was an American country singer. ... Kitty Wells (born Ellen Muriel Deason on August 30, 1919) is an American Country Music Singer. ... Olivia Newton-John AO OBE (born 26 September 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated English-born Australian pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947, Birmingham, Alabama) is a country, folk, alternative rock, and alternative country musician. ... Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American popular vocalist and entertainer who has earned multiple Grammy Awards, an Emmy Award, numerous certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, and Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. ... Stella Parton (born May 4, 1949) is an American Country Music singer and songwriter. ...


Parton's commercial success continued to grow during 1980, as she had three number one hits in a row: the Donna Summer-written "Starting Over Again," "Old Flames (Can't Hold a Candle to You)," and "9 to 5." [15] "9 to 5", the theme song to the movie Parton starred in 1980, along with Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, did not just reach No. 1 on the Country charts, but also No. 1 on the Pop and Adult Contemporary charts, giving her a triple No. 1 hit. Parton became one of the few female Country singers to have a No. 1 single on the Country and Pop charts simultaneously. Songs called 9 to 5 include: 9 to 5 (Sheena Easton song) 9 to 5 (Dolly Parton song) This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Jane Fonda (born December 21, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, writer, political activist, former fashion model, and fitness guru. ... Lily Tomlin (born Mary Jean Tomlin on September 1, 1939), is an Academy Award-nominated American actress and comedian. ...


Parton's singles continued to appear consistently in the country Top Ten: between 1981 and 1985, she had 12 Top Ten hits and half of those were number one singles. Parton continued to make inroads on the pop charts as well with a re-recorded version of "I Will Always Love You" from The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas scraping the Top 50 and her Kenny Rogers duet "Islands in the Stream" (which was written by the Bee Gees and produced by Barry Gibb) spending two weeks at number one. [16] Kenneth Ray[2] Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... Islands in the Stream was a 1989 hit country music single for Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton, written by the Bee Gees. ...


However, by 1985 many old-time fans had felt that Parton was spending too much time courting the mainstream. Most of her albums were dominated by the adult contemporary pop of songs like "Islands in the Stream," and it had been years since she had sung straightforward country. She also continued to explore new business and entertainment ventures such as her Dollywood theme park, which opened in 1986. Despite these misgivings, she had continued to chart well until 1986, when none of her singles reached the Top Ten. RCA Records didn't renew her contract after it expired that year, and she signed with Columbia in 1987. [17]


1987 – 1994: Return to country roots

In 1987, along with Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt, she released the decade-in-the-making Trio album, to critical acclaim. The album strongly revitalized Parton's temporarily stalled music career, spending five weeks at #1 on Billboard's Country Albums chart, selling several million copies and producing four Top 10 Country hits including Phil Spector's "To Know Him Is To Love Him," which went to #1. Trio was nominated for a Grammy Award for Album Of The Year and was awarded "Best Country Vocal Performance - Duo or Group." (A second and more contemporary collaboration, "Trio II," would finally see release in 1999 and would be another Grammy-winning success). In 1993, she teamed up with fellow country music queens Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette for a similar project, the Honky Tonk Angels album. Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947, Birmingham, Alabama) is a country, folk, alternative rock, and alternative country musician. ... Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American popular vocalist and entertainer who has earned multiple Grammy Awards, an Emmy Award, numerous certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, and Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. ... Trio was a 1987 album featuring country and rock superstars Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt. ... Harvey Philip Spector (born December 26, 1939) is an American musician, songwriter and record producer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A dozen years after the release of their original Trio album, the country music supergroup returned with another in the same vein. ... Loretta Lynn (born Loretta Webb April 14, 1934) is an American country singer-songwriter and was one of the leading country female vocalists during the 1960s and 1970s and overall is revered as a country icon. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was an American country singer and songwriter. ...


1989's White Limozeen, which produced two number one hits in "Why'd You Come in Here Lookin' Like That" and "Yellow Roses." Though it looked like Parton's career had been revived, it was actually just a brief revival before contemporary country came in the early '90s and moved all veteran artists out of the charts [18] A 1991 duet with Ricky Van Shelton, "Rockin' Years," reached No. 1 in 1991, but Parton's greatest commercial fortune of the decade -- and probably of all-time -- came when Whitney Houston recorded "I Will Always Love You" for The Bodyguard soundtrack, and both the single and the album were massively successful. In 1993, she recorded the album Honky Tonk Angels with Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette. [19] The album was certified "Gold" by the RIAA, and helped revive the careers of Wynette and Lynn. White Limozeen was a 1989 Dolly Parton album that returned the singer to the country music fold, after the critical and commercial failure of 1987s Rainbow. ... Ricky Van Shelton (born January 12, 1952 in Danville, Virginia) is a country singer best known for his songs Life Turned Her That Way, Ill Leave This World Loving You, and Ive Cried my Last Tear for You. ... For other uses, see The Bodyguard (disambiguation). ... Honky Tonk Angels is a 1993 Columbia Records album historically teaming country legends Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Tammy Wynette. ... Loretta Lynn (born Loretta Webb April 14, 1934) is an American country singer-songwriter and was one of the leading country female vocalists during the 1960s and 1970s and overall is revered as a country icon. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was an American country singer and songwriter. ...


1995 – present: Career today

Parton re-recorded "I Will Always Love You" with Vince Gill, and they won a CMA award for vocal event in 1996. Taken from the album Trio II, a cover of "After the Gold Rush" won a Grammy for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals in 1999, and Parton was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame later that year. [20] Vince Gill (born Vincent Grant Gill[1], April 12, 1957) is an American neotraditional country musician, songwriter, and singer. ... The Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals was first awarded in 1988. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ...


She recorded a series of critically acclaimed bluegrass albums, beginning with "The Grass is Blue" (1999) and "Little Sparrow" (2001), both of which won Grammy Awards. Her 2002 album "Halos & Horns" included a bluegrass version of the Led Zeppelin classic Stairway to Heaven. In 2005, Parton released Those Were The Days, her interpretation of hits from the folk-rock era of the late 1960s through early 1970s. The CD featured such classics as John Lennon's "Imagine," Cat Stevens' "Where Do The Children Play," Tommy James' "Crimson & Clover," and Pete Seeger's folk classic "Where Have All The Flowers Gone." Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... Halos & Horns was a 2002 Dolly Parton album. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... This article is about the Led Zeppelin song. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Yusuf Islam[1], formerly known by his stage name Cat Stevens (born Steven Demetre Georgiou on 21 July 1948 in London, UK), is an English musician, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, educator, philanthropist and prominent convert to Islam. ... Tommy James (born Thomas Jackson on April 29, 1947 in Dayton, Ohio) is an American pop-rock musician and singer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Where Have All the Flowers Gone? is a folk song of the 1960s written by Pete Seeger and Joe Henderson. ...


In 2006, she earned her second Oscar nomination for "Travelin' Thru," which she wrote specifically for the film Transamerica. Due to the song's nature of accepting a transgender woman without judgement, Dolly recieved numerous death threats as a direct result. She also returned to No. 1 on the country charts later that year by lending her distinctive harmonies to the Brad Paisley ballad, "When I Get Where I'm Going." [21] In September 2007, Parton released her first single off her own record company, Dolly Records titled, "Better Get to Livin'", which eventually peaked at No. 48 on the Hot Country Songs chart. Her latest album, Backwoods Barbie was released February 26, 2008 and reached #2 on the country charts. The album's debut at No. 17 on the all-genre Billboard 200 albums chart was the highest in her career. [22] Transamerica Corporation is an insurance and investment company in the United States. ... Brad Douglas Paisley (born October 28, 1972 in Glen Dale, West Virginia) is an American country music singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... When I Get Where Im Going is Brad Paisleys second single from his album Time Well Wasted and is his fourteenth career single. ... Hot Country Songs is a chart released weekly by Billboard magazine in the United States. ...


Songwriting

Parton is a hugely successful songwriter, having begun by writing country music songs with strong elements of folk music in them, based upon her upbringing in humble mountain surroundings, and reflecting her family's evangelical Christian background. Her songs "Coat of Many Colors" and "Jolene" have become classics in the field, as have a number of others. As a composer, she is also regarded as one of country music's most gifted storytellers, with many of her narrative songs based on persons and events from her childhood. Parton has published almost 600 songs with BMI to date and has earned 37 BMI awards for her material. [23] Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Folk song redirects here. ... In the Hebrew Bible, the coat of many colors is the name for the (possibly) multicolored garment that Joseph owned. ... Jolene is a song written and performed by Dolly Parton from her album Jolene (1974), produced by Bob Ferguson. ... Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) is a collecting society that protects composers intellectual property in the communications business, especially radio. ...


In concert and on tour

Parton toured extensively from the late 1960s until the early 1990s.


Dollywood Foundation Shows

From the early 1990s through 2001, her concert appearances were primarily limited to one weekend a year at her Dollywood theme park benefiting her Dollywood Foundation. The concerts normally followed a theme. (Legends in Concert, a 50's concert) They have included Holiday shows during Christmas time as well. Dollywood is a theme park owned by country music singer Dolly Parton and the Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation. ... The Dollywood Foundation is the organizational body that oversees the Imagination Library, a free book distribution program started by Dolly Parton in 1996. ...


Halos & Horns Tour

After a decade long absence from touring, Parton decided to hit the road in 2002 with the Halos & Horns Tour, an 18-city, intimate club tour to promote the CD of the same name. House of Blues Entertainment, Inc. produced the tour and it sold out all of its U.S. and European dates (her first in two decades).


Hello I'm Dolly Tour

In 2004, she returned to mid-sized stadium venues in 36 cities in the US and Canada with her Hello I'm Dolly Tour, a glitzier, more elaborate stage show than two years earlier. With nearly 140,000 tickets sold, the "Hello I'm Dolly" tour was the tenth-biggest country tour of the year and grossed more than $6 million.


The Vintage Tour

In late 2005 Parton completed a 40-city tour with The Vintage Tour promoting her new album, Those Were The Days.


European Tour

In the late months of 2006 Parton scheduled mini concerts throughout the U.S. and Canada, as a gear up to her European tour in early March 2007. This was her first world tour in many years and hit 17 cities in 21 dates, running from March 6 through April 3.


The European Tour 2007 sold out in every European city and gained mostly positive reviews. It took in just over $16 million for 21 shows. The most remarked upon feature of the shows was that very few in attendance, despite Parton being 60, had ever seen her in concert. This, coupled with Parton's enormous popularity in Europe, led to a very well received reception when she took the stage.


Backwoods Barbie Tour

Parton is currently gearing up for a world tour known as the Backwoods Barbie Tour. It was set to begin with a U.S. run in February, March, and April of 2008 to coincide with the release of the album of the same name. However, due to recent back problems she has postponed all US dates for at least 6 weeks.


She'll travel to Europe for the summer, and shows will continue back in the United States, Canada, and reportedly Australia through the end of 2008 and into 2009.


Acting career

Film

During the mid-1970s, Parton had her eyes set on expanding her audience base. The first step towards meeting this goal was her attempt at a variety show, Dolly!. Even though it had high ratings, the show lasted merely one season, with Dolly Parton asking out of her contract due to the stress it was causing her vocal cords. (In 1987 she tried a second TV variety show, also titled Dolly, which lasted only one season.) Dolly! was a television variety show that aired during the 1976 season and featured Dolly Parton. ... A variety show is a show with a variety of acts, often including music and comedy skits, especially on television. ... Dolly was a television variety show that ran on ABC during the 1987-1988 season featuring Dolly Parton. ...


In 1980, Jane Fonda decided Parton was a perfect candidate for her upcoming film, 9 to 5. She was looking for a brassy Southern woman for a supporting role and felt the singer was perfect. Parton received acclaim for her performance, receiving Golden Globe nominations for Best Motion Picture Actress — Musical/Comedy and New Star of the Year in a Motion Picture — Female. She also scored the biggest solo hit of her career with the title song, which she wrote; it earned her an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song. She received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Original Song — Motion Picture. The song won two Grammy Awards, for Best Female Country Vocal Performance and Best Country Song. It reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was also #78 on American Film Institute's 100 years, 100 songs. She was also named the Top Female Box Office Star title by Motion Picture Herald in both 1981 and 1982. Jane Fonda (born December 21, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, writer, political activist, former fashion model, and fitness guru. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Nine to Five, also known as 9 to 5, is a 1980 comedy movie starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton, and Dabney Coleman and a television series of the same name starring Rachel Dennison, Rita Moreno, and Valerie Curtin. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Song is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are songwriters and composers. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Parton's other films include The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982), for which she received another Golden Globe nomination, Rhinestone where she was paired with Sylvester Stallone, and Steel Magnolias. Parton's last lead role in a theatrical film was in 1992's Straight Talk, opposite James Woods. She played the plainspoken host of a radio program that has people phoning in with problems. The film, while not a blockbuster, did respectably well upon its release. She played an overprotective mother in Frank McKlusky, C.I. with Dave Sheridan, Cameron Richardson, and Randy Quaid. The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas is a stage and film musical written by Larry L. King. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone[1] (born July 6, 1946) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, director, producer and screenwriter. ... Steel Magnolias, by Robert Harling, is a 1987 off-Broadway play, made into a movie in 1989. ... Straight Talk is an American 1992 comedy film starring Dolly Parton. ... For other persons named James Woods, see James Woods (disambiguation). ... Dave Sheridan was the underground cartoonist who is perhaps best-known for his character Dealer McDope. ... Cameron Richardson (born Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1980) is a US actor. ... Randall Rudy Randy Quaid (born October 1, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and comedian. ...


She also played herself in a cameo appearance towards the end of the Hollywood adaptation of The Beverly Hillbillies. For the 1993 film, see The Beverly Hillbillies (film) The Beverly Hillbillies was an American television program about a hillbilly family transplanted in Southern California. ...


Television

On the small screen, she appeared in the movie Unlikely Angel as an angel sent back to earth following a deadly car crash. And she starred in the movie Blue Valley Songbird where she lives through her music. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Parton has also done voice work for animation, playing herself in the TV series Alvin & the Chipmunks (episode: Urban Chipmunk) (1987) and her voice role as Katrina Eloise "Murph" Murphy in The Magic School Bus (episode: The Family Holiday Special) (1994). She has appeared on many non-musical television shows, usually in cameo roles as herself, for example as "Aunt Dolly" visiting Hannah and her family in the Disney Channel series Hannah Montana (in 2006 "Good Golly, Miss Dolly" and 2007 episode "I Will Always Loathe You"). The Disney role came about due to her real-life relationship as series star Miley Cyrus' godmother. [24] She also appeared in an episode of Reba as Dolly a real estate agency owner. On April 1, 2008, Parton was the guest mentor to the finalists on American Idol, who each interpreted one of her songs. On the following night's episode, the finalists sang "9 to 5", and Parton herself performed "Jesus and Gravity". The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... Created by Ross Bagdasarian in 1958, Alvin and the Chipmunks is a fictional musical group consisting of three singing chipmunks — Alvin, Simon, and Theodore — who are managed by their human dad and leader, David Dave Seville. ... The Magic School Bus is a series of childrens books intended to teach scientific concepts to children. ... Hannah Montana is a television series which debuted on March 24, 2006 on Disney Channel. ... The seventh season of American Idol, which began on January 14, 2008, is the current season of the annual reality show and singing competition. ...


Other acting projects

Aside from 9 to 5, Parton's music has been featured prominently in other films. In 1982, she recorded a second version of "I Will Always Love You" for The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas; the second version proved to be another #1 country hit and also managed to reach the pop charts, going to #53 in the United States. Nine to Five, also known as 9 to 5, is a 1980 comedy movie starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton, and Dabney Coleman and a television series of the same name starring Rachel Dennison, Rita Moreno, and Valerie Curtin. ...


"I Will Always Love You" has been covered by many country artists, including such music legends as Linda Ronstadt, on "Prisoner In Disguise" and Kenny Rogers on his 1997 album "Always and Forever," which sold over 4 million copies worldwide, and by LeAnn Rimes. In 1992, Whitney Houston performed it on The Bodyguard soundtrack. Houston's version became the best-selling hit ever written and performed by a female vocalist, with worldwide sales of over 12 million copies. Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American popular vocalist and entertainer who has earned multiple Grammy Awards, an Emmy Award, numerous certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, and Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. ... Kenneth Ray[2] Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... Whitney Elizabeth Houston (born August 9, 1963) is a six-time Grammy award winning, American R&B singer, soprano, pianist, actress, film producer, and former model. ... For other uses, see The Bodyguard (disambiguation). ...


Parton has twice been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song, for "9 to 5" in 1980, and for "Travelin' Thru" from Transamerica, filmed in 2005. She was considered the front-runner in the 2005 Oscar song category, but the song lost to "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp," from the movie Hustle and Flow. Had Parton's song won, she would have become the first country artist to win an Oscar. (Although other country songs have won the Best Song category in the past, all previous winners had actually been written by non-country artists, most often classical or pop composers.) "Travelin' Thru" did win as Best Original Song award at the 2005 Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards. The song was also nominated, though it did not win, for both Best Original Song by the Foreign Press' for the Golden Globes as well as Best Song by the Broadcast Film Critics Association. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Song is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are songwriters and composers. ... Travelin Thru is a 2005 song written by actress-singer Dolly Parton and used in the critically-acclaimed film Transamerica. ... Transamerica is a Golden Globe-winning and Academy Award-nominated 2005 comedy-drama produced by IFC Films and The Weinstein Company. ... Its Hard Out Here for a imp is a 2005 song written for the film Hustle & Flow by Memphis hip hop artists Paul Beauregard and Jordan Houston (both from rap group Three 6 Mafia), and Cedric Coleman. ... Promotional poster for Hustle & Flow Hustle & Flow is a movie directed by Craig Brewer. ... The Phoenix Film Critics Society (PFCS) is an organization of film reviewers from Phoenix-based publications. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) is the largest film critics organization in the U.S. and Canada, representing 199 television, radio and online critics. ...


Another Parton performance, "The Day I Fall In Love," a duet with James Ingram from the film Beethoven's 2nd was nominated for an Oscar in 1994 and was performed live by the duo on the awards telecast. Oscar nominations, however, are for the songwriter, not performer, and it did not win. Beethovens 2nd is the first sequel to the 1992 film, Beethoven. ...


According to a broadcast of the public radio program Studio 360 from 10-29-05,[2] as of October 2005 Parton was in the midst of composing the songs for a planned Broadway musical adaptation of the film 9 to 5. In late June 2007, 9 to 5, the Musical was read for industry presentations. The readings starred Megan Hilty, Allison Janney, Stephanie J. Block, Bebe Neuwirth, and Marc Kudisch. [25] Studio 360 is a national American public weekly radio program about arts and culture hosted by Kurt Andersen and produced by Public Radio International and WNYC in New York City. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Nine to Five, also known as 9 to 5, is a 1980 comedy movie starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton, and Dabney Coleman and a television series of the same name starring Rachel Dennison, Rita Moreno, and Valerie Curtin. ... Megan Hilty (born Megan Kathleen Hilty on March 29, 1981 in Bellevue, Washington, U.S.) is an American stage and television actress. ... Allison Brooks Janney (born November 19, 1959) is an Emmy-winning American actress, perhaps best known for her portrayal of C. J. Cregg on the American television series The West Wing and of Prudy on the 2007 film adaption of the musical Hairspray . ... Stephanie J. Block (born Stephanie Janette Block on September 19, 1972) is an American stage actress and member of Actors Equity and the Los Angeles Musical Theater Guild. ... Bebe Neuwirth Beatrice Bebe Neuwirth (born December 31, 1958) is an American theater, television, and film actress. ... Marc Kudisch is an American stage actor. ...


Image

Parton has turned down several offers to pose for Playboy magazine and similar publications, although she did appear on the cover of Playboy magazine's October, 1978 issue wearing a Playboy bunny outfit, complete with ears. Breast-obsessed filmmaker Russ Meyer wanted to make movies about her 36 FF cup size breast. The association of breasts with Parton's public image is illustrated in the naming of Dolly the sheep after her, since the sheep was cloned from a cell taken from an adult ewe's mammary gland.[26][27] For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Playboy Bunny at the Karma Foundation Inaugural Gala hosted at the Playboy Mansion, October 2005 A Playboy Bunny was a waitress at the Playboy Clubs (open 1960–1988). ... Breast fetishism (also known as: mastofact, or breast partialism[1]) is a type of sexual preference. ... For the baseball player, see Russ Meyer (baseball player). ... Dolly and her first-born lamb, Bonnie Dolly (July 5, 1996 – February 14, 2003), a female sheep or ewe, was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult somatic cell. ...


On a 2003 broadcast of The Oprah Winfrey Show, Winfrey asked what kind of cosmetic surgery Parton had undergone. Parton stated that she felt that cosmetic surgery was imperative in keeping with her famous image, but jokingly admitted, "If I have one more facelift I'll have a beard!". Parton has repeatedly joked about her physical image and surgeries, saying "If I see something sagging, bagging and dragging, I’m going to nip it, tuck it, and suck it!" and "It takes a lot of money to look this cheap." She also used to call herself a "female drag queen".[citation needed] The Oprah Winfrey Show (also known as Oprah) is a United States syndicated talk show, hosted and produced by its namesake Oprah Winfrey, and is the highest-rated talk show in American television history. ... Plastic surgery is a general term for operative manual and instrumental treatment which is performed for functional or aesthetic reasons. ... Facelift has several meanings: Facelift is an album by Alice in Chains; facelift is a cosmetic surgery procedure; facelift is the revival of a product through cosmetic means. ...


Other works

Business

Parton invested much of her earnings into business ventures in her native East Tennessee, notably Pigeon Forge, which includes a theme park named Dollywood (the former Silver Dollar City) and a dinner show called Dolly Parton's Dixie Stampede, which also has venues in Branson, Missouri and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The area is a thriving tourist attraction, drawing visitors from large parts of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States. This region of the U.S., like most areas of Appalachia, had suffered economically for decades; Parton's business investment has revitalized the area. She also has Dollywood's Splash Country in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Her Dixie Stampede location in Orlando, Florida closed down in January 2008 after the land and building used by the show were sold to a developer. Pigeon Forge is a city in Sevier County, Tennessee, United States. ... Dollywood is a theme park owned by country music singer Dolly Parton and the Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation. ... Dixie Stampede is a dinner theater with four locations in the Southern United States. ... Branson is the name of two places in the United States: Branson in Colorado Branson in Missouri Branson could also refer to Richard Branson, British entrepreuner. ... Myrtle Beach is a city located in Horry County, South Carolina. ... Areas included within the Appalachian Regional Commissions charter. ...


She also owns Sandollar Productions, a film and television production company, which produced the Fox TV shows Babes and Buffy the Vampire Slayer and the features Father of the Bride I & II, Straight Talk, Sabrina (1995 film), and Academy Award-winning (for Best Documentary) Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt, among other shows. Sanddollar is co-owned by Sandy Gallin, Parton's former manager. Babes was an American situation comedy series that ran for one season on the Fox Television Network from September 13, 1990 to August 10, 1991. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... Father of the Bride is a 1950 comedy film which tells the story of a man trying to cope with all of the disasters that happen along the way from the time that his daughter announces that shes engaged, until the wedding actually occurs. ... Straight Talk is an American 1992 comedy film starring Dolly Parton. ... Sabrina is a 1995 film adapted by Barbara Benedek and David Rayfiel, based on the 1954 screenplay, which in turn was based upon a play entitled Sabrina Fair. ...


Parton also owned her own wig company in the early 1990s. A wig or toupee is a head of hair - human, horse-hair or synthetic - worn on the head for fashion or various other aesthetic and stylistic reasons, including cultural and religious observance. ...


Philanthropic efforts

Since the mid-1980s Parton has been praised for her many charitable efforts, particularly in the area of literacy. Her literacy program, Dolly Parton's "Imagination Library", which mails one book per month to children from the time of their birth until they enter kindergarten, began in Sevier County, Tennessee, but has now been replicated in 566 counties across thirty-six U.S. states (as well as Canada[28]). In December 2007 it crossed the Atlantic when she chose the Yorkshire town of Rotherham to be the first British locality to receive the books, a gesture which did not meet with universal approval within the borough council, where one member objected to a one hour delay in the council meeting so the other members could meet Parton[29]. It has resulted in Parton's receiving the Association of American Publishers' AAP Honors in 2000, Good Housekeeping's Seal of Approval in 2001 (the first time the seal had been given to a person), the American Association of School Administrators' Galaxy Award in 2002, the Chasing Rainbows Award from the National State Teachers of the Year in 2002, and the Child and Family Advocacy Award from the Parents As Teachers National Center in 2003. She was honored as a "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress for her work.[30] The program distributes more than 2.5 million free books to children annually. There is also a Rotherham, New Zealand , Rotherham is a town in South Yorkshire, England. ... Rotherham is a metropolitan borough of South Yorkshire, England. ...


Her Dollywood theme park has also been noted for bringing jobs and tax revenues to a previously depressed region. Dollywood is a theme park owned by country music singer Dolly Parton and the Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation. ...


Her efforts to preserve the bald eagle through the American Eagle Foundation's sanctuary at Dollywood earned her the Partnership Award from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2003.


She has also worked to raise money on behalf of several other causes, including the Red Cross and a number of HIV/AIDS-related charities. The terms Red Cross and Red Crescent are often used as short names for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, or its two leading international organs, the ICRC and the IFRCS. This page is about the symbol itself, see respective articles for information about the organizations and movements. ...


In December 2006, Parton pledged $500,000 toward a proposed $90 million hospital and cancer center to be constructed in Sevierville, Tennessee, in the name of Dr. Robert F. Thomas, the physician who delivered her; she also announced plans for a benefit concert to raise additional funds for the project. The concert went ahead playing to about 8,000 people.[31] Sevierville is a city located in Sevier County, Tennessee, and is its county seat6. ...


Dolly published a cookbook in 2006 entitled Dolly's Dixie Fixin's. The proceeds support the Dollywood Foundation, under which falls the Dolly Parton Imagination Library.


Awards and honors

Parton is one of the most-honored female country performers of all time. She has achieved 25 RIAA certified gold, platinum and multi-platinum honors. She has had 26 songs reach No. 1 on the Billboard country charts, a record for a female artist. She has 42 career top-10 country albums, a record for any artist, and 110 career-charted singles over the past 40 years. All inclusive sales of singles, albums, hits collections, paid digital downloads and compilation usage during Parton's career have reportedly topped 100 million records around the world.[32] The RIAA Logo. ...


She has received seven Grammy Awards and a total of 42 Grammy nominations. At the American Music Awards she has won three awards, but has received 18 nominations. At the Country Music Association, she has received 10 awards and 42 nominations. At the Academy of Country Music, she has won seven awards and 39 nominations. She is one of only five female artists (including Reba McEntire, Barbara Mandrell, Shania Twain, and Loretta Lynn), to win the Country Music Association's highest honor, "Entertainer of the Year." Reba Nell McEntire (born March 28, 1955) is a Grammy award winning American singer and country music performer, and actress. ... Barbara Mandrell (b. ... Shania Twain, IPA: OC (born Eilleen Regina Edwards, August 28, 1965, Windsor, Ontario) is a Canadian singer and songwriter in the country and pop music genres. ... Loretta Lynn (born Loretta Webb April 14, 1934) is an American country singer-songwriter and was one of the leading country female vocalists during the 1960s and 1970s and overall is revered as a country icon. ... The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


She was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Recording in 1984, located at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood; a star on the Nashville Star Walk for Grammy winners; and a bronze sculpture on the courthouse lawn in Sevierville, Tennessee. She has called the statue of herself in her hometown "the greatest honor," because it came from the people who knew her. Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue...


Parton was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry in 1969, and in 1986 was named one of Ms. Magazine's Women of the Year. In 1986, Parton was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 1999, Parton received country music's highest honor, an induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame. She received an honorary doctorate from Carson-Newman College in 1990. This was followed by induction into the National Academy of Popular Music/Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2001. In 2002, Parton ranked No. 4 in CMT's 40 Greatest Women of Country Music. magazine Ms. ... The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame was established by the Nashville Songwriters Foundation, Inc. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... CMT can refer to: Cadmium Mercury Telluride Canal Metropolitano Televisión Catalog Management Table Certified Market Technician Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Childrens Musical Theatreworks of Fresno, California Chip Multi Threading Comision del Mercado de las Telecommunicaciones, the Spanish communications industry regulator. ...


She was honored in 2003 with a tribute album called Just Because I'm a Woman: Songs of Dolly Parton. The artists who recorded versions of Parton's songs included Melissa Etheridge ("I Will Always Love You"), Alison Krauss ("9 to 5"), Shania Twain ("Coat of Many Colors"), Me'Shell NdegéOcello ("Two Doors Down"), Norah Jones ("The Grass is Blue"), and Sinéad O'Connor ("Dagger Through the Heart"); Parton herself contributed a rerecording of the title song, originally the title song for her first RCA album in 1968. Parton was awarded the Living Legend medal by the U.S. Library of Congress on April 14, 2004, for her contributions to the cultural heritage of the United States. This was followed in 2005 with the National Medal of Arts, the highest honor given by the U.S. government for excellence in the arts. Melissa Lou Etheridge (born May 29, 1961, in Leavenworth, Kansas) is an Academy Award-winning and two-time Grammy Award-winning American rock musician and singer. ... Alison Krauss (born July 23, 1971)[1] is an American bluegrass-country singer and fiddle player. ... Shania Twain, IPA: OC (born Eilleen Regina Edwards, August 28, 1965, Windsor, Ontario) is a Canadian singer and songwriter in the country and pop music genres. ... Meshell Ndegeocello (born Michelle Lynn Johnson on August 29, 1968 in Berlin, Germany) is an American singer, rapper, bassist, and multi-instrumentalist. ... Norah Jones (born Geethali Norah Jones Shankar on March 30, 1979) is an American singer-songwriter, pianist, keyboardist, guitarist, and occasional actress of Anglo-American and Bengali descent. ... Sinéad Marie Bernadette OConnor (pronounced [1]) (born December 8, 1966) is a Grammy Award winning Irish singer and songwriter. ... A Library of Congress Living Legend is someone recognized by the Library of Congress for his or her creative contributions to American life. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ...


On Dec. 3, 2006, Dolly Parton was honored by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts for her lifetime of contributions to the arts. Other 2006 honorees included Zubin Mehta, Steven Spielberg, Smokey Robinson and Andrew Lloyd Webber. During the show, some of country music's biggest names came to show their admiration. Carrie Underwood performed Dolly's hit "Islands in the Stream" with original duet partner Kenny Rogers. Alison Krauss performed "Jolene" and duetted "Coat of Many Colors" with Shania Twain. Vince Gill performed "I Will Always Love You" which he duetted with Dolly. Jessica Simpson sang "9 to 5" but left the stage in shame mid-way through after forgetting the lyrics. The broadcast on national television did not include her performance. Reba McEntire & Reese Witherspoon also came to pay tribute. The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... Zubin Mehta (b. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Carrie Marie Underwood (born March 10, 1983 in Muskogee, Oklahoma) is an American country singer-songwriter who won the fourth season of American Idol. ... Kenneth Ray[2] Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... Alison Krauss (born July 23, 1971)[1] is an American bluegrass-country singer and fiddle player. ... Shania Twain, IPA: OC (born Eilleen Regina Edwards, August 28, 1965, Windsor, Ontario) is a Canadian singer and songwriter in the country and pop music genres. ... Vince Gill (born Vincent Grant Gill[1], April 12, 1957) is an American neotraditional country musician, songwriter, and singer. ... Jessica Ann Simpson (born July 10, 1980) is an American pop singer and actress who rose to fame in the late 1990s. ... Reba Nell McEntire (born March 28, 1955) is a Grammy award winning American singer and country music performer, and actress. ... Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon[1] (born March 22, 1976) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ...


Discography

Main article: Dolly Parton discography

Filmography

Nine to Five, also known as 9 to 5, is a 1980 comedy movie starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton, and Dabney Coleman and a television series of the same name starring Rachel Dennison, Rita Moreno, and Valerie Curtin. ... The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas is a stage and film musical written by Larry L. King. ... Rhinestone is a 1984 20th Century Fox comedy motion picture starring Sylvester Stallone and Dolly Parton. ... Steel Magnolias, by Robert Harling, is a 1987 off-Broadway play, made into a movie in 1989. ... Straight Talk is an American 1992 comedy film starring Dolly Parton. ... The Beverly Hillbillies is a 1993 20th Century Fox comedy motion picture starring Jim Varney (of the Ernest movies), Diedrich Bader, Erika Eleniak, Cloris Leachman, Lily Tomlin, Dabney Coleman, and Penny Fuller. ...

Television

TV filmography

  • A Smoky Mountain Christmas (1986) ... Lorna Davis
  • Steel Magnolias (1989)....Truvy
  • Wild Texas Wind (1991) ... Thiola "Big T" Rayfield
  • Big Dreams and Broken Hearts: The Dottie West Story (1995) ... cameo as herself
  • Naomi and Wynonna: Love Can Build a Bridge (1995) ... Herself/Guest Performer
  • Get To The Heart: The Barbara Mandrell Story (1997) ... Herself/Cameo
  • Unlikely Angel (1996) ... Ruby Diamond
  • Blue Valley Songbird (1999) ... Leanna Taylor
  • Jackie's Back (1999) ... Herself/Cameo

A Smoky Mountain Christmas is a 1986 movie staring country music singer Dolly Parton and actor Lee Majors. ... Steel Magnolias, by Robert Harling, is a 1987 off-Broadway play, made into a movie in 1989. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

TV series

  • Heavens to Betsy (1994) (comedy - three episodes, unaired) ... Betsy

Unlikely Angel is a 1996 Christmas film starring Dolly Parton. ...

TV guest appearances

The Country Music Association Awards also known as the CMA Awards, are voted on by business members of the Country Music Association. ... Rowan & Martins Laugh-In was a United States comedy television show broadcast from January 22, 1968 through 1973 over the NBC Network. ... The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson was a late-night talk show hosted by Johnny Carson under the Tonight Show franchise from 1962 to 1992. ... For the EP from the musical band Birthday Party, see Hee Haw (EP). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Captain Kangaroo was a childrens television series which aired weekday mornings on the American television network CBS from 1955 until 1984, then moved to the American Program Service (now American Public Television, Boston) to air syndicated reruns of past episodes in 1992. ... The American Music Awards show is one of four annual major American music awards shows (the others being the Billboard Music Awards, the Grammy Awards, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony). ... The Midnight Special was a musical television series that ran from 1972 until 1983 on the NBC network. ... Alvin and the Chipmunks was the second American animated television series to feature the singing characters The Chipmunks, produced by Bagdasarian Productions, Ruby-Spears Productions, and Lorimar-Telepictures (which became Lorimar Television in 1988). ... The Country Music Association Awards also known as the CMA Awards, are voted on by business members of the Country Music Association. ... SNL redirects here. ... This article is about a television show. ... Babes was an American situation comedy series that ran for one season on the Fox Television Network from September 13, 1990 to August 10, 1991. ... The Magic School Bus is a series of childrens books intended to teach scientific concepts to children. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bette. ... Stevie Ray Vaughan performing on Austin City Limits. ... Reba is an American sitcom starring country music singer Reba McEntire. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Hannah Montana is a television series which debuted on March 24, 2006 on Disney Channel. ... For the video game based on the American series, see Dancing with the Stars (video game) International versions of Dancing with the Stars Dancing with the Stars is the name for a number of international television series based on the format of the British series Strictly Come Dancing. ... 9 to 5 is a phrase which refers to the time (9:00AM to 5:00PM, or 0900h - 1700h) at which some office employees work each day, usually from Monday to Friday. ... Macys Day Parade redirects here. ... For the current American Idol season, see American Idol (season 7). ... For the current American Idol season, see American Idol (season 7). ...

TV music and variety series

Porter Wagoner (born August 12, 1927, in West Plains, Missouri, in the Ozark Mountains) is an American country music singer. ... Dolly Dolly was a television variety show that aired during the 1976 season and featured Dolly Parton. ... Dolly Parton and Miss Piggy performing a musical number in a 1987 episode of Dolly Dolly was a television variety show that ran on ABC during the 1987-1988 season featuring Dolly Parton. ...

TV specials

  • Rowan and Martin Special 1973
  • Mac Davis Special 1977
  • Cher . . . Special 1978
  • Carol and Dolly in Nashville 1979
  • Mac Davis Special 1979
  • Mac Davis Special 1980
  • Best Little Special In Texas 1982
  • Dolly In London 1983
  • Dolly Parton Meets The Kids 1983
  • Kenny & Dolly: Once Upon A Christmas 1984
  • Kenny & Dolly: Real Love 1985
  • Bob Hope Christmas Special 1988
  • Kenny, Dolly & Willie: Something Inside So Strong 1989
  • Home For Christmas 1990
  • Treasures 1996
  • Precious Memories (1999)
  • Graham Goes To Dollywood (2001)
  • Cross Roads, Melissa Etheridge & Dolly Parton (2003)
  • A Capitol Fourth (2003)
  • Stars Over Texas (2003)
  • U.S. Library Of Congress Living Legend Ceremony (2004)

Home for Christmas was a 1990 Dolly Parton holiday album. ... Treasures was a 1996 Dolly Parton album, comprised of covers of rock and country hits from the 1960s and 1970s. ... Precious Memories is a traditional gospel hymn credited to J.B.F. Wright in 1925. ... A Capitol Fourth is a free annual concert performed on the west lawn of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., in celebration of the Fourth of July. ...

Documentaries

Our Country is a country founded by Peter Ström, Jonathan Puckey, Risto Kalmre, Vincent van de Waal and Celine Wouters in september 2005, as a part of the touring exhibition Publish And Be Damned. ... The Travel Channel is a cable television network that features documentaries and how-to shows related to travel and leisure around the United States and throughout the world. ... E! True Hollywood Story is a TV documentary series on the E! Entertainment Television cable and DBS channel that deals with famous Hollywood celebrities, movies, TV shows and well-known public figures. ... Chasing Rainbows is a 1930 American romantic musical film directed by Charles Reisner. ... Biography is a documentary television program. ...

See also

The Academy of Country Music (ACM) was founded in 1964 in Los Angeles, California. ... The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... This is an alphabetical list of notable country music performers. ... The worlds best-selling music artists cannot be listed officially, as there is no organization that has recorded global music sales in the manner that the RIAA does in the United States. ... A look alike contest is a game where individuals dress up and try to imitate and look like a famous person. ... Just Because Im a Woman was Dolly Partons first solo album for RCA, released in 1968. ... In the Good Old Days (When Times Were Bad) was a 1969 Dolly Parton album. ... My Blue Ridge Mountain Boy was Dolly Partons third solo album for RCA. originally released in September 1969. ... The Fairest of Them All was a 1970 Dolly Parton album. ... The Golden Streets of Glory was a 1971 collection of spirituals recorded by Dolly Parton. ... Joshua was a 1971 album by Dolly Parton that included her first song to top the U.S. country charts (the title song). ... In the Hebrew Bible, the coat of many colors is the name for the (possibly) multicolored garment that Joseph owned. ... Touch Your Woman is a 1972 album by Dolly Parton. ... My Tennessee Mountain Home was a 1973 Dolly Parton album, the title track of which became one of her better known compositions. ... Bubbling Over was a 1973 Dolly Parton album. ... Jolene is a 1974 Dolly Parton album, produced by Bob Ferguson. ... Love Is like a Butterfly was a 1974 album and single by Dolly Parton. ... The Bargain Store was a 1975 single and album by Dolly Parton. ... All I Can Do was a 1976 Dolly Parton album. ... New Harvest - First Gathering was a 1977 Dolly Parton album, significant for being Partons first self-produced album, as well as her first effort aimed specifically at the pop charts. ... Here You Come Again was a 1977 single and album by Dolly Parton. ... Heartbreaker was a 1978 Dolly Parton album and single. ... Great Balls of Fire was a 1979 Dolly Parton album, that continued the singers attempts to crossover to the pop charts. ... Dolly, Dolly, Dolly was a 1980 album by Dolly Parton. ... 9 to 5 and Odd Jobs was an album released by Dolly Parton in December 1980. ... Heartbreak Express was a Dolly Parton album. ... Burlap & Satin was a 1983 album by Dolly Parton that straddled the line between pop and country sounds. ... The Great Pretender was a 1984 Dolly Parton album, comprised of covers of hits from the 1950s and 1960s. ... Real Love was a 1985 Dolly Parton. ... Rainbow was a Dolly Parton album from 1987, her first after switching labels to CBS Records, after nearly two decades with RCA. The original plan was for Parton to alternate between releasing pop and country albums (rather than trying to combine the two styles on each album), but due to... White Limozeen was a 1989 Dolly Parton album that returned the singer to the country music fold, after the critical and commercial failure of 1987s Rainbow. ... Home for Christmas was a 1990 Dolly Parton holiday album. ... Eagle When she Flies was a 1991 Dolly Parton album. ... Slow Dancing With the Moon was a 1993 Dolly Parton album that, in addition to Parton, featured a number of famous guest artists, including Mary Chapin Carpenter, Kathy Mattea, Tanya Tucker, Maura OConnell, Billy Dean, Pam Tillis, Marty Stuart and Billy Ray Cyrus. ... Something Special was a 1995 Dolly Parton album. ... Treasures was a 1996 Dolly Parton album, comprised of covers of rock and country hits from the 1960s and 1970s. ... Hungry Again was a 1998 Dolly Parton album. ... The Grass is Blue is a 1999 bluegrass album by Dolly Parton. ... Little Sparrow was a 2001 Dolly Parton album, the second in a trilogy of folk/bluegrass albums Parton released between 1999 and 2002. ... Halos & Horns was a 2002 Dolly Parton album. ... For God and Country was a 2003 Dolly Parton album, featuring spirituals and patriotic songs. ... Those Were the Days is a 2005 album released by Grammy-award winning singer/songwriter Dolly Parton. ... Just the Two of Us was a 1968 duet album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton. ... Always, Always was a 1969 duet album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton. ... Porter Wayne and Dolly Rebecca was a 1970 duet album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton. ... Once More was a duet album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton from 1970. ... Two of a Kind was a 1971 duet album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton. ... For the Porter Wagoner/Dolly Parton album The Right Combination, see The Right Combination Curtis Mayfield’s 1980 collaboration with disco singer Linda Clifford. ... Together Always was a 1972 studio album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton. ... We Found It was an album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton, released in February 1973. ... Love and Music was a 1973 album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton, released in July 1973. ... Porter n Dolly was a duet album by Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton from 1974. ... Porter & Dolly is an album, released in July 1980, featuring Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton, comprised mostly of previously unreleased material from their duet years (1967 - 74). ... The Winning Hand, Monument, 1982 The Winning Hand was a 1982 album featuring Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, Brenda Lee and Kris Kristofferson. ... Once Upon a Christmas was a 1984 holiday album by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. ... Once Upon a Christmas was a 1984 holiday album by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. ... Trio was a 1987 album featuring country and rock superstars Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt. ... Honky Tonk Angels is a 1993 Columbia Records album historically teaming country legends Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Tammy Wynette. ... A dozen years after the release of their original Trio album, the country music supergroup returned with another in the same vein. ... The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas film soundtrack was released along with the film in July 1982. ... Rhinestone was a soundtrack album from the 1984 film starring Dolly Parton and Sylvester Stallone. ... Straight Talk was the soundtrack to the 1992 film of the same name starring Dolly Parton and James Woods. ... A Real Live Dolly was a live concert album by Dolly Parton from 1970. ... Live And Well is a 2004 live album released by Grammy-award winning singer/songwriter Dolly Parton. ... Nine to Five, also known as 9 to 5, is a 1980 comedy movie starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton, and Dabney Coleman and a television series of the same name starring Rachel Dennison, Rita Moreno, and Valerie Curtin. ... For the 1978 Broadway musical, see The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Steel Magnolias, by Robert Harling, is a 1987 off-Broadway play, made into a movie in 1989. ... Straight Talk is an American 1992 comedy film starring Dolly Parton. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is a Grammy Award-winning country music singer/songwriter, author, actress and philanthropist. ... Dollywood is a theme park owned by country music singer Dolly Parton and the Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation. ... Dollywoods Splash Country is a Smoky Mountain-themed water park located in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee adjacent to the Dollywood theme park. ... Dixie Stampede is a dinner theater with four locations in the Southern United States. ... The Dollywood Foundation is the organizational body that oversees the Imagination Library, a free book distribution program started by Dolly Parton in 1996. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "Dolly Parton talks new album, tour", CNN, 9 July 2002.
  2. ^ "Backwoods glam", The Washington Times, 1 December 2006.
  3. ^ Parton, Dolly (1994). Dolly: My Life And Other Unfinished Business. Harper Collins, pp. 142. ISBN 0060177209. 
  4. ^ "Dolly Parton: Goddaughter Miley Cyrus More Than Hannah Montana", Portable Planet, 2008-03-18. Retrieved on 2008-04-02. 
  5. ^ "Dolly Parton: Miley Is a "Little Elvis"", OK! Magazine, 2008-03-17. Retrieved on 2008-04-03. "Though she admits she is slightly biased as 15-year-old Miley is her goddaughter, Dolly still can't hold back the compliments for the teen star." 
  6. ^ CASH; the Autobiography; Cash, Johnny, 1998
  7. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2005). Top Country Songs 1944-2005. Billboard/Record Research Inc., pp. 108, 422. ISBN 0898201659. 
  8. ^ Nash, Alana (1978). Dolly. Reed Books, pp. 64-70. ISBN 0891695230. 
  9. ^ Dolly Parton at all music guide
  10. ^ Dolly Parton at all music guide
  11. ^ Dolly Parton at all music guide
  12. ^ "Dolly Parton Reflects on Her Greatest Moments", CMT, 7 July 2006.
  13. ^ [1]
  14. ^ Dolly Parton biography at All Music Guide
  15. ^ Dolly Parton biography at All Music Guide
  16. ^ Dolly Parton at All Music Guide
  17. ^ Dolly Parton biography at All Music Guide
  18. ^ Dolly Parton biography at All Music Guide
  19. ^ Dolly Parton biography at CMT.com
  20. ^ Dolly Parton at CMT.com
  21. ^ Dolly Parton biography at CMT.com
  22. ^ "Janet Dethrones Jack To Top Billboard 200", Billboard Online, 5 March 2008.
  23. ^ "Dolly Parton to be Honored as BMI ICON at Country Awards", BMI News, 2 November 2003.
  24. ^ "Dolly Parton interview". US*99.5's Morning Show hosts Lisa Dent & Ramblin' Ray. 2007-11-02.
  25. ^ Playbill News: A Cup of Ambition: 9 to 5 Musical Takes Next Step in NYC Reading with Neuwirth, Janney, Block
  26. ^ Naming of Dolly the Sheep. BBC (February 22, 1997).
  27. ^ Dolly was world's hello to cloning's possibilities. usatoday (July 4, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  28. ^ Details of Canadian Scheme
  29. ^ "Hello Dolly but not everyone is glad", article by Paul Stokes in The Daily Telegraph Issue No 47,431 (dated 3rd December 2007)
  30. ^ Fischer, Audrey. Dolly Parton, Living Legend. Library of Congress.
  31. ^ "Parton pledges $500,000 to hospital", USA Today, 12/13/2006. 
  32. ^ dollymania.net

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... OK! is a British weekly magazine, specialising in celebrity news. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Dolly Parton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3667 words)
Parton was born in Sevierville, Tennessee, the fourth of twelve children born to Robert Lee Parton and Avie Lee Owens.
Parton is a hugely successful songwriter, having begun by writing country songs with strong elements of folk music in them based upon her upbringing in humble mountain surroundings.
Parton was awarded the Living Legend medal by the U.S. Library of Congress on April 14, 2004, for her contributions to the cultural heritage of the United States.
Salon.com People | Dolly Parton (667 words)
Dolly Rebecca Parton was born in January 1946 in the Smoky Mountains of east Tennessee.
Dolly's mother, Avie Lee Parton, married at 15 and had given birth to 12 children (one child, Larry, died as an infant) by the age of 35; Dolly was the fourth.
In that sense, Dolly Parton's story is a textbook case of a young woman yearning for fame and riches as a way of escaping, and helping her family to escape, extreme poverty.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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