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Encyclopedia > Doctor of Dental Surgery

The DDS degree, referring to Doctor of Dental Surgery, denotes one of a few degrees that are awarded to dentists, the others being Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD), Bachelor of Dentistry (BDent), or Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS)or (B.Ch.D), all of which are equivalent degrees for the practice of Dentistry. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Doctor of Dental Surgery. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Doctor of Dental Surgery. ...

Contents

Pre-Dental Education in the U.S.

In order to earn a DDS/DMD in the United States, at least 3 years of undergraduate education is required first (although nearly every dental school requires at least a bachelors degree). There is no mandatory course of study while an undergraduate other than satisfactorily completing the requisite "pre-dental" courses; these typically include one year of organic chemistry, in addition to one year of each of the three primary sciences (general biology, chemistry and physics) and a single year of English. Although the majority of dental schools only require the aforementioned courses, other schools have requirements beyond these. In addition to the core prerequisites, the dental admissions test (DAT) is also required. The DAT is usually taken during the spring semester of one's junior year. Finally, every dental school, with the exception of Creighton, requires an interview before admissions can be granted. The interview is designed to evaluate the motivation, character and personality of the applicant. It is often a crucial step in the admissions process. The vast majority of dental students major in a science (biology, biochemistry or chemistry); however, this is not required and many students often elect to major in a non-science related field such as, English, Art History, Business, History, Sociology or Psychology. Due to the large number of applicants, dental school admission is increasingly competitive. Nearly 12,000 applicants applied for the class of 2011 for approximately 4,300 spots. The average dental school applicant admitted in 2006 for the class of 2010 had an overall GPA of 3.52 and a Science GPA of 3.44. Additionally, the mean DAT Academic Average for the class of 2010 was 19.29 and a Perceptual Ability Test (PAT) score of 18.42; however, many dental schools expect much more. Organic chemistry is a specific discipline within chemistry which involves the scientific study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and preparation (by synthesis or by other means) of chemical compounds consisting of primarily carbon and hydrogen, which may contain any number of other elements, including nitrogen, oxygen, halogens as well... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Chemistry - the study of interactions of chemical substances with one another and energy based on the structure of atoms, molecules and other kinds of aggregrates Chemistry (from Egyptian kēme (chem), meaning earth[1]) is the science concerned with the reactions, transformations and aggregations of matter, as well as accompanying... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Dental Education/Training in the U.S.

Dental school is four academic years in duration and is similar in format to medical school--consisting of two years of basic medical and dental sciences, followed by two years of clinical training (with continued didactic coursework). Before graduating, every dental student must successfully complete the National Board Dental Examination Part I and II (commonly referred to as NBDE I & II). The NBDE Part I is usually taken at the end of the second year after the majority of the didactic courses have been completed. The NBDE Part I covers anatomic sciences, biochemistry, physiology, microbiology, pathology, and dental anatomy and occlusion. The NBDE Part II is usually taken during winter of the last year of dental school and consists of operative dentistry, pharmacology, endodontics, periodontics, oral surgery, pain control, prosthodontics, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, oral pathology, and radiology. NBDE Part I scores are of importance when considering residency training after graduating from dental school. Pathology (from Greek pathos, feeling, pain, suffering; and logos, study of; see also -ology) is the study of the processes underlying disease and other forms of illness, harmful abnormality, or dysfunction. ... Dental anatomy or anatomy of teeth is a field of anatomy dedicated to the study human teeth structures. ... Occlusion is the relationship between the maxillary and mandibular teeth that exists when they approach each other, as occurs during chewing or at rest. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmakon (φάρμακον) meaning drug, and lego (λέγω) to tell (about)) is the study of how substances interact with living organisms to produce a change in function. ... If decay progresses to the first stage, a small filling will be required. ... Periodontics is the study of clinical aspects of the supporting structures of the teeth (i. ... Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is a specialty of dentistry. ... The gate control theory of pain of Ron Melzack and Patrick Wall arises from evolutionary psychology. ... Prosthodontics is one of the nine dental specialties recognized by the American Dental Association (ADA) and requires 3-4 years of additional formal training in an ADA approved program. ... Orthodontics is a specialty of dentistry that is concerned with the study and treatment of malocclusions (improper bites), which may be a result of tooth irregularity, disproportionate jaw relationships, or both. ... Pedodontics, or Pediatric Dentistry, is a specialized branch of dentistry for the treatment of children. ... Oral pathology, also known in the United States of America as oral and maxillofacial pathology is the specialty of dentistry and pathology which deals with the nature, identification, and management of diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. ... Image A: A normal chest X-ray. ...


After graduating, the vast majority of new dentists go directly into practice while a small percentage of dentists apply to a residency program. Some residency programs train dentists in advanced general dentistry such as General Practice Residencies and Advanced Education in General Dentistry Residencies, commonly referred to as GPR and AEGD. Most GPR and AEGD programs are one year in duration but several are two years long or provide an optional second year. GPR programs are usually affiliated with a hospital and thus require the doctor to treat a wide variety of patients including trauma, critically ill, and medically compromised patients. Additionally, GPR programs require residents to rotate through various department within the hospital such anesthesia, internal medicine, and emergency medicine to name a few. AEGD programs are usually in a dental school setting where the focus is treating complex cases in a comprehensive manner.


Dental Specialties

There are 9 recognized dental specialties in the US, Canada, and Australia. To become a specialist requires one to train in a residency or advanced graduate training program. Once residency is completed, the doctor is granted a certificate of training. Many specialty programs have optional or required advanced degrees such as (MD or MBBS specific to Maxillofacial Surgery), MS, or PhD. Maxillofacial surgery is part of a regional surgical specialty called Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. ...

  • Orthodontics: 2-3 years
  • Endodontics: 2-3 years
  • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: 4-6 years (additional time for MD/MBBS degree granting programs)
  • Periodontics: 3 years
  • Prosthodontics: 3 years (a Prosthdontist may elect to sub-specialize in Maxillofacial Prosthetics which requires an additional year of training after completing a prosthodontic program)
  • Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology: 3 years
  • Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: 3 years
  • Pedodontics: 2-3 years
  • Dental Public Health: 1-2 years

Orthodontics is a specialty of dentistry that is concerned with the study and treatment of malocclusions (improper bites), which may be a result of tooth irregularity, disproportionate jaw relationships, or both. ... If decay progresses to the first stage, a small filling will be required. ... Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is surgery to correct a wide spectrum of diseases, injuries and defects in the head, neck, face, jaws and the hard and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial region. ... Periodontics is the study of clinical aspects of the supporting structures of the teeth (i. ... Prosthodontics is one of the nine dental specialties recognized by the American Dental Association (ADA) and requires 3-4 years of additional formal training in an ADA approved program. ... Pedodontics is a specialist branch of dentistry for the treatment of children. ...

Licensing Exams in the U.S.

To practice, a dentist must pass a licensing examination administered by an individual state or more commonly a region. There are a handful of states that maintain independent dental licensing examinations while the majority accept a regional board examination. The Northeast Regional Board (NERB), Western Regional Board (WREB), Central Regional Dental Testing Service (CRDTS, and Southern Regional Testing Agency (SRTA) are the four regional testing agencies that administer licensing examinations. Once the examination is passed, the dentist may then apply to individual states that accept the regional board test passed. Each state requires one to pass an ethics/jurisprudence examination as well before a license is granted. To maintain one's dental license the doctor must complete Continuing Education (CE) courses periodically. This promotes the continued exploration of knowledge. The amount of CE required varies from state to state but is generally 10-24 CE hours a year.


The DDS in Canada

The Doctorate of Dental Surgery degree is also awarded and recognized in Canada by the Canadian Dental Association. The requirements for an average DDS program (such as from the University of Toronto) include a course in biochemistry, in physiology, 2 courses in the Life Sciences (anatomy, biology, genetics, etc.), and an additional course in either the Humanities (art, music, history, etc.) or the Social Sciences (sociology, psychology, anthropology, etc.).[1] The University of Toronto (U of T) is a coeducational public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


Several Universities in Canada offer the DDS degree, including the University of Toronto, the University of Western Ontario, the University of Alberta, and Dalhousie University, while the remaining Canadian dental schools offer the Doctor of Dental Medicine degree to their graduates. The University of Toronto (U of T) is a coeducational public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The University of Western Ontario (known as Western, as well as UWO or Western Ontario) is a research university located in London, Ontario, Canada. ... The University of Alberta (U of A) is a public coeducational research university located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Dalhousie University is a university located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Doctor of Dental Surgery. ...


Australia and New Zealand

Australian and New Zealand Dental schools offer the BDent or BDS degrees which are also equivalent to the DDS and DMD for the practice of dentistry.


References


  Results from FactBites:
 
UMB Dental School Admissions Doctor of Dental Surgery Program (1511 words)
Dental graduates are well prepared to enter advanced dental education programs and to practice their professions in a wide range of private practice, public service, and academic settings.
The Committee on Dental Recruitment and Admissions reserves the right to modify the prerequisites when additional courses are necessary to improve an applicant's preparation for dental school.
The Committee on Dental Recruitment and Admissions uses the DAT as an adjunct to the applicant's educational credentials to assess potential admissibility.
Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) Degree Program (668 words)
Applicants are strongly encouraged to complete a baccalaureate degree prior to starting their dental education.
A number of variables will be considered: academic credentials, Dental Admission Test scores, letters of recommendation, and your written responses to a series of questions.
The Reserved Admission Program for the Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) degree at the UMKC School of Dentistry enables highly motivated, ambitious, talented Missouri and Kansas residents to pursue their dream of becoming a dentist.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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