FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Doctor Who
Doctor Who

Current Doctor Who title sequence
Format Science fiction drama
Created by Sydney Newman
C. E. Webber
Donald Wilson
Starring Various Doctors
(currently David Tennant)
Various companions
Theme music composer Ron Grainer,
Delia Derbyshire
Opening theme Doctor Who theme music
Composer(s) Various composers
(currently Murray Gold)
Country of origin United Kingdom
No. of episodes 751 (as of 5 July 2008) (List of episodes)
Production
Running time 25 min. (1963–1984, 1986–1989)
45 min. (1985, 2005–Present)
various other lengths
Broadcast
Original channel BBC One (originally known as BBC tv)
Picture format 405-line black & white (1963–1967)
625-line black & white (1968–1969)
PAL 625-line colour (1970–1989)
720x576 16:9 (2005–2008)
Original run Classic Series:
23 November 1963
6 December 1989
Television Movie:
12 May 1996
Current Series:
26 March 2005 – present
Chronology
Related shows K-9 and Company
Torchwood
The Sarah Jane Adventures
K-9
Doctor Who Confidential
Totally Doctor Who
Torchwood Declassified
External links
Official website
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Doctor Who is a British science fiction television programme produced by the BBC. The programme depicts the adventures of a mysterious alien time-traveller known as "the Doctor" who travels in his space and time-ship, the TARDIS, which appears from the exterior to be a blue police box. With his companions, he explores time and space, solving problems, facing monsters and righting wrongs. Doctor Who is the title of a long running British science fiction series. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 576 pixel, file size: 98 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a good quality screengrab from Doctor Who, which I capped using my TV Tuner. ... This example of a title sequence, from long-running serial drama Another World, was seen from 1966 to 1981, making it one of the longest-running continuous title sequences on television. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... Sydney Cecil Newman OC (April 1, 1917—October 30, 1997) was a Canadian film and television producer, best remembered for the pioneering work he undertook in British television drama from the late 1950s to the late 1960s. ... Cecil Edwin Webber (known as C. E. Webber and nicknamed Bunny by his colleagues) was a British television writer. ... Donald Wilson (born September 1, 1910, Dunblane, Scotland; died March 6, 2002, Gloucestershire, England) was a British television writer and producer, best known for his work on the BBCs adaptation of The Forsyte Saga in 1967. ... The ten faces of the Doctor on television Clockwise from top-left: William Hartnell, Patrick Troughton, Jon Pertwee, Tom Baker, Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy, Paul McGann, Christopher Eccleston and David Tennant. ... David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... Companion, in the long-running BBC television science fiction programme Doctor Who and related works, is a term used to describe a character who travels with and shares the adventures of the Doctor. ... Ron Grainer (August 11, 1922 - February 21, 1981) was an Australian-born composer who worked for most of his professional career in the United Kingdom. ... Delia Ann Derbyshire (5 May 1937 - 3 July 2001) was a British musician and composer who was a pioneer of electronic music. ... The Doctor Who theme music was created in 1963, composed by Ron Grainer and realised with electronics by Delia Derbyshire of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. ... Murray Gold (born 1969, Portsmouth, England) is a British composer for stage, film, and television and a dramatist for both theatre and radio. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... BBC Television is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which began in 1932. ... 576i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aspect ratio (disambiguation). ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sarah Jane Smith (Elisabeth Sladen) and K-9. ... For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ... The Sarah Jane Adventures is a British television series, produced by BBC Wales for CBBC, starring Elisabeth Sladen and created by Russell T. Davies. ... For the Doctor Who character, see K-9 (Doctor Who). ... The Doctor Who Confidential logo Doctor Who Confidential is a documentary series created by the British Broadcasting Corporation to complement the revival of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Totally Doctor Who is a childrens television series produced by the BBC to accompany the science fiction series Doctor Who. ... Torchwood Declassified is a documentary series created by the British Broadcasting Corporation to complement the British science fiction television series Torchwood. ... A broadcast of the long-running and popular British science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... The current TARDIS prop. ... A police box is a telephone kiosk or callbox for use by members of the police. ... Companion, in the long-running BBC television science fiction programme Doctor Who and related works, is a term used to describe a character who travels with and shares the adventures of the Doctor. ... This is a list of monsters and aliens from the long-running BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...


The programme is listed in Guinness World Records as the longest-running science fiction television show in the world[1] and is also a significant part of British popular culture.[2][3][4] It has been recognised for its imaginative stories, creative low-budget special effects during its original run, and pioneering use of electronic music (originally produced by the BBC Radiophonic Workshop). In Britain and elsewhere, the show has become a cult television favourite and has influenced generations of British television professionals, many of whom grew up watching the series. It has received recognition from critics and the public as one of the finest British television programmes, including the BAFTA Award for Best Drama Series in 2006. Guinness World Records 2008 edition. ... Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... Special effects (also called SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to realize scenes that cannot be achieved by live action or normal means. ... The BBC Radiophonic Workshop, one of the sound effects units of the BBC, was created in 1958 to produce effects and new music for radio, and was closed in March 1998, although much of its traditional work had already been outsourced by 1995. ... This article does not discuss cultist groups, personality cults, or cult in its original sense of religious practice. See cult (disambiguation) for more meanings of the term cult. A cult following is a group of fans devoted to a specific area of pop culture. ... The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... The British Academy Television Award for Best Drama Series is one of the major categories of the British Academy Television Awards (BAFTAs), the primary awards ceremony of the British television industry. ...


The programme originally ran from 1963 to 1989. After an unsuccessful attempt to revive regular production with a backdoor pilot in the form of a 1996 television film, the programme was successfully relaunched in 2005, produced in-house by BBC Wales. Some development money for the new series is contributed by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), which is credited as a co-producer. Doctor Who has also spawned spin-offs in multiple media, including the current television programmes Torchwood and The Sarah Jane Adventures, and the 1981 pilot episode K-9 and Company. A television pilot is the first episode of an intended television series. ... Doctor Who (film) redirects here. ... The Doctor Who diamond logo, used in the shows opening titles from 1973 to 1980 Doctor Who is a British television science-fiction series, produced and screened by the British Broadcasting Corporation on their BBC One channel from 1963 to 1989 in its original form, with a new series... In-house refers to the production of some commodity or service, such as a television programme, using a companys own funds, staff or resources. ... BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ... Radio-Canada redirects here. ... Doctor Who spin-offs refers to material created outside of, but related to, the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ... The Sarah Jane Adventures is a British television series, produced by BBC Wales for CBBC, starring Elisabeth Sladen and created by Russell T. Davies. ... Sarah Jane Smith (Elisabeth Sladen) and K-9. ...


The show's lead character is currently portrayed by David Tennant. In the programme's most recent series, which ran from April 5 to July 5, 2008,[5] Catherine Tate played the Doctor's companion, reprising her role of Donna Noble from the 2006 Christmas special.[6] Another Christmas special will air in 2008, followed by four more specials in 2009; the next full series has been confirmed for airing in 2010.[7] David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the actress. ... Donna Noble is a fictional character played by Catherine Tate in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Runaway Bride is a special episode of the long running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, starring David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Doctor Who

Doctor Who first appeared on BBC television at 5:15 pm(GMT) on 23 November 1963,[8] following discussions and plans that had been in progress for a year. The Head of Drama, Sydney Newman, was mainly responsible for developing it, with the first format document for the series being written by Newman along with the Head of the Script Department (later Head of Serials) Donald Wilson and staff writer C. E. Webber. Writer Anthony Coburn, story editor David Whitaker and initial producer Verity Lambert also heavily contributed to the development of the series.[9][10][11] The series' title theme was composed by Ron Grainer and realised by Delia Derbyshire of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop.[12] The programme was originally intended to appeal to a family audience.[13] The BBC drama department's Serials division produced the programme for 26 series, broadcast on BBC One. Viewing numbers that had fallen (though comparably increased at some points), a decline in the public perception of the show and a less prominent transmission slot saw production suspended in 1989 by Jonathan Powell, Controller of BBC One.[14] Although it was for all intents and purposes cancelled (as series co-star Sophie Aldred reported in the documentary Doctor Who: More Than 30 Years in the TARDIS), the BBC said the series would return. The Doctor Who diamond logo, used in the shows opening titles from 1973 to 1980 Doctor Who is a British television science-fiction series, produced and screened by the British Broadcasting Corporation on their BBC One channel from 1963 to 1989 in its original form, with a new series... GMT redirects here. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Cathy Come Home, a 1966 entry into The Wednesday Play anthology series, voted the best drama and second highest programme overall in the British Film Institutes 2000 survey of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes of the 20th century. ... Sydney Cecil Newman OC (April 1, 1917—October 30, 1997) was a Canadian film and television producer, best remembered for the pioneering work he undertook in British television drama from the late 1950s to the late 1960s. ... Donald Wilson (born September 1, 1910, Dunblane, Scotland; died March 6, 2002, Gloucestershire, England) was a British television writer and producer, best known for his work on the BBCs adaptation of The Forsyte Saga in 1967. ... Cecil Edwin Webber (known as C. E. Webber and nicknamed Bunny by his colleagues) was a British television writer. ... Anthony Coburn was an Australian United Kingdom. ... Script Editor is a program included with Mac OS that allows AppleScripts to be written, debugged, and ran. ... David Whitaker (b. ... The primary role of a television producer is to coordinate and control all aspects of production, ranging from show idea development and cast hiring to shoot supervision and fact-checking. ... Verity Lambert (born November 27, 1935 in London, England, UK) is a British television and film producer, best known for producing the science-fiction series Doctor Who for the BBC for its first two years, from 1963 to 1965. ... Ron Grainer (August 11, 1922 - February 21, 1981) was an Australian-born composer who worked for most of his professional career in the United Kingdom. ... Delia Ann Derbyshire (5 May 1937 - 3 July 2001) was a British musician and composer who was a pioneer of electronic music. ... The BBC Radiophonic Workshop, one of the sound effects units of the BBC, was created in 1958 to produce effects and new music for radio, and was closed in March 1998, although much of its traditional work had already been outsourced by 1995. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... Jonathan Powell (born 1947) is a British television producer and executive. ... In television, cancellation refers to the termination of a program by the network, typically because of low viewership. ... Sophie Aldred with a fan at Dr. Who Signing in Newbury, Nov 2007 Sophie Aldred (born 20 August 1962) is an English actress and television presenter, best known for her portrayal of the Doctors assistant Ace in the television series Doctor Who. ...


While in-house production had ceased, the BBC was hopeful of finding an independent production company to relaunch the show. Philip Segal, a British expatriate who worked for Columbia Pictures' television arm in the United States, approached the BBC about such a venture. Segal's negotiations eventually led to a television movie. The Doctor Who television movie was broadcast on the Fox Network in 1996 as a co-production between Fox, Universal Pictures, the BBC, and BBC Worldwide. Although the film was successful in the UK (with 9.1 million viewers), it was less so in the United States and did not lead to a series. Philip David Segal was born in Essex, England in the 1958. ... For the band, see Expatriate (band). ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... “Telefilm” redirects here. ... Doctor Who (film) redirects here. ... FOX redirects here. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation, formed out of a restructuring of its predecessor BBC Enterprises in 1995. ...


Licensed media such as novels and audio plays provided new stories, but as a television programme Doctor Who remained dormant until 2003. In September of that year, BBC Television announced the in-house production of a new series after several years of unsuccessful attempts by BBC Worldwide to find backing for a feature film version. The executive producers of the new incarnation of the series are writer Russell T Davies and BBC Wales Head of Drama/BBC Television Controller of Drama Commissioning Julie Gardner. It has been sold to many other countries worldwide (see Viewership). Doctor Who spin-offs refers to material created outside of, but related to, the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... BBC Television is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which began in 1932. ... Russell T Davies, OBE (born Steven Russell Davies,[1] 27 April 1963), is a Welsh television producer and writer. ... BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ... She was born on September 3, 1981 in Richmond, Virginia. ...


The new series debuted with the episode "Rose" on BBC One on 26 March 2005. There have been two further series in 2006 and 2007, and Christmas Day specials in 2005, 2006 and 2007. The fourth series began on BBC One on 5 April 2008. There will be a rest year in 2009, with no new series, although David Tennant will star in 3 specials in that year. After the 2008 Christmas special and three special episodes in 2009, a fifth full-length series is planned for Spring 2010,[15] with Steven Moffat replacing Davies as head writer and executive producer.[16] Rose is an episode in the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on 26 March 2005. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Steven Moffat (born 1961 in Paisley, Scotland) is a British comedy/drama writer who has contributed to television series since the late 1980s. ...


While the 2005-present version of Doctor Who is considered a direct continuation of the 1963-89 series, the 1996 telefilm is also considered part of the overall continuity. This differs from other series relaunches that have either been reimaginings or reboots (e.g., Battlestar Galactica and Bionic Woman) or series taking place in the same universe as the original but with a totally new cast of characters (e.g., Star Trek: The Next Generation and spin-offs).[17] This article is about the 2004 television series. ... This article is about the 2007 series. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ...


Public consciousness

A multicoloured variant of the familiar Doctor Who diamond logo which was used in the show's titles from Seasons 11 to 17. This version was widely used on merchandise for years afterwards.
A multicoloured variant of the familiar Doctor Who diamond logo which was used in the show's titles from Seasons 11 to 17. This version was widely used on merchandise for years afterwards.

The programme rapidly became a national institution, the subject of countless jokes, newspaper mentions and other popular culture references.[18][19] Many renowned actors asked for or were offered and accepted guest starring roles in various stories. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Many celebrities and notable actors have made guest appearances in Doctor Who. ...


With popularity came controversy over the show's suitability for children. Moral campaigner Mary Whitehouse repeatedly complained to the BBC in the 1970s over what she saw as the show's frightening or gory content.[20] The programme became even more popular - especially with children. John Nathan-Turner, who produced the series during the 1980s, was heard to say that he looked forward to Whitehouse's comments, as the show's ratings would increase soon after she had made them.[21] During the 1970s, the Radio Times, the BBC's listings magazine, announced that a child's mother said the theme music terrified her son. The Radio Times was apologetic, but the theme music remained. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Nathan-Turner. ... Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ... A listings magazine is a magazine which contains information about the upcoming weeks events such as TV Listings, Music, Clubs, Theatre and Film information, examples include Time Out magazine in the UK. These are normally published either with a Saturday or Sunday newspaper or are published weekly to give information...


There were more complaints about the programme's content than its music. During Jon Pertwee's second season as the Doctor, in the serial "Terror of the Autons" (1971), images of murderous plastic dolls, daffodils killing unsuspecting victims and blank-featured android policemen marked the apex of the show's ability to frighten children. Other notable moments in that decade included the Doctor's apparently being drowned by Chancellor Goth in "The Deadly Assassin" (1976) and the allegedly negative portrayal of Chinese people in "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" (1977). John Devon Roland Pertwee (7 July 1919 – 20 May 1996), better known as Jon Pertwee, was an English actor. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... Terror of the Autons is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from January 2 to January 23, 1971. ... The Deadly Assassin is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 30 to November 20, 1976. ... The Talons of Weng-Chiang is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts from February 26 to April 2, 1977. ...


It has been said that watching Doctor Who from a position of safety "behind the sofa" (as the Doctor Who exhibition at the Museum of the Moving Image in London was titled) and peering cautiously out to see if the frightening part was over is one of the great shared experiences of British childhood. The phrase has become commonly used in association with the programme and occasionally elsewhere. Behind the sofa is a British pop culture phrase, used as a metaphor to describe the actions that a state of fear may drive a person to — i. ... The Museum of the Moving Image (MOMI) was a museum of the history of moving picture technology and media, including cinema and its forerunners, opened in 1988 and sited below Waterloo Bridge and forming part of the cultural complex on the South Bank of the River Thames, London. ...

The Mark II fibreglass TARDIS used between 1980 and 1989.
The Mark II fibreglass TARDIS used between 1980 and 1989.

A BBC audience research survey conducted in 1972 found that by their own definition of "any act(s) which may cause physical and / or psychological injury, hurt or death to persons, animals or property, whether intentional or accidental", Doctor Who was the most violent of all the drama programmes the corporation then produced.[22] The same report found that 3% of the surveyed audience regarded the show as "very unsuitable" for family viewing.[23] However, responding to the findings of the survey in The Times newspaper, journalist Philip Howard maintained that: "to compare the violence of Dr Who, sired by a horse-laugh out of a nightmare, with the more realistic violence of other television series, where actors who look like human beings bleed paint that looks like blood, is like comparing Monopoly with the property market in London: both are fantasies, but one is meant to be taken seriously."[22] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The current TARDIS prop. ... For other uses, see Times. ... This article is about the board game. ...


The image of the TARDIS has become firmly linked to the show in the public's consciousness. In 1996, the BBC applied for a trademark to use the TARDIS' blue police box design in merchandising associated with Doctor Who.[24] In 1998, the Metropolitan Police filed an objection to the trademark claim; in 2002 the Patent Office ruled in favour of the BBC.[25][26] [27] The current TARDIS prop. ... “(TM)” redirects here. ... A police box is a telephone kiosk or callbox for use by members of the police. ... The UK Intellectual Property Office, or UK-IPO, formerly known as The Patent Office,[1] is the lead United Kingdom government agency responsible for developing and administering policy in most areas of intellectual property, under the overall aegis of the Department of Trade and Industry. ...


The programme's broad appeal attracts audiences of children and families as well as science fiction fans. Its camp tendencies have also made it popular in gay culture.[28] Campy redirects here. ... Christopher Street Parade Sexuality and gender identity-based cultures concern the culture, knowledge, and references shared by members of sexual minorities or transgendered people by virtue of their membership in those minorities or their state of being transgendered. ...


The 21st-century revival of the programme has become the centrepiece of BBC One's Saturday schedule, and has "defined the channel".[29] In 2007, Caitlin Moran, television reviewer for The Times, wrote that Doctor Who is "quintessential to being British".[4] Caitlin Moran (b. ... For other uses, see Times. ...


Episodes

Further information: List of Doctor Who serials and List of titled Doctor Who episodes

Doctor Who originally ran for 26 seasons on BBC One, from 23 November 1963 until 6 December 1989. During the original run, each weekly episode formed part of a story (or "serial") — usually of four to six parts in earlier years and three to four in later years. Notable exceptions were the epic The Daleks' Master Plan, which aired in twelve episodes (plus an earlier one-episode teaser, "Mission to the Unknown", featuring none of the regular cast),[30][31] almost an entire season of 7-episode serials (season 7), the 10-episode serial The War Games[32], and The Trial of a Time Lord, which ran for 14 episodes (albeit divided into three production codes and four narrative segments) during Season 23.[33] Occasionally serials were loosely connected by a storyline, such as Season 16's quest for The Key to Time or Season 18's journey through E-Space and the theme of entropy. Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... This is a list of titled episodes in the early years of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Serial, see Serial (disambiguation). ... The Daleks Master Plan is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in twelve weekly parts from November 13, 1965 to January 29, 1966. ... Mission to the Unknown is a single-episode Doctor Who story. ... This article is about the Doctor Who serial. ... The Trial of a Time Lord is the on-screen title for all fourteen episodes comprising the 23rd season (1986) of the original Doctor Who series. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... The Key to Time is the umbrella title for a story arc that links all six serials of Season 16 of Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... The level of hyperspace in which memetic life forms are able to live in David Brins Uplift series. ...


The programme was intended to be educational and for family viewing on the early Saturday evening schedule. Initially, it alternated stories set in the past, which would teach younger audience members about history, with stories set either in the future or in outer space to teach them about science. This was also reflected in the Doctor's original companions, one of whom was a science teacher and another a history teacher.


However, science fiction stories came to dominate the programme and the "historicals", which were not popular with the production team, were dropped after The Highlanders (1967). While the show continued to use historical settings, they were generally used as a backdrop for science fiction tales, with one exception: Black Orchid set in 1920s Britain.[34] The Highlanders is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from December 17, 1966 to January 7, 1967. ... Black Orchid is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in two parts on March 1 and March 2, 1982. ...


The early stories were more serial-like in nature, with the narrative of one story flowing into the next, and each episode having its own title, although produced as distinct stories with their own production codes. Following The Gunfighters (1966), however, each serial was given its own title, with the individual parts simply being assigned episode numbers. What to name these earlier stories is often a subject of fan debate. The Gunfighters is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from April 30 to May 21, 1966. ... Fans of the BBC television series Doctor Who disagree as to what certain stories should be called. ...


Writers during the original run included Terry Nation, Henry Lincoln, Douglas Adams, Robert Holmes, Terrance Dicks, Dennis Spooner, Eric Saward, Malcolm Hulke, Christopher H. Bidmead, Stephen Gallagher, Brian Hayles, Chris Boucher, Peter Grimwade, Marc Platt and Ben Aaronovitch. Terry Nation (August 8, 1930 – March 9, 1997) was a British television screenwriter and is probably best known for creating the villainous Daleks for the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Henry Lincoln (born 1930) is the most popular pseudonym of Henry Soskin, an English writer and actor. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... This entry is about the television scriptwriter. ... Terrance Dicks (born 1935 in East Ham, London) is an English writer, best known for his work in television and for writing a large number of popular childrens books during the 1970s and 80s. ... Dennis Spooner (born 1 December 1932 in Tottenham London; died 20 September 1986) was a British television scriptwriter, known for his ability to write to order if necessary, who created the classic British television series Man in a Suitcase, The Champions and The Adventurer, as well as writing for others... Eric Saward (pronounced SAY-ward) was born in December 1944 and became a script writer and script editor for the BBC, resigning from the latter post on the TV programme Doctor Who in 1986. ... Malcolm Hulke (died July 6, 1979) was a British television writer, notable for his work on the science fiction series Doctor Who. ... Christopher Hamilton Bidmead (born 1941) is a freelance writer. ... Stephen Gallagher (born 13 October 1954 in Salford Lancashire) is a British writer. ... This biographical article needs to be wikified. ... Chris Boucher Chris Boucher (born 1943) is a British television writer, best known for his frequent contributions to two genres, science-fiction and crime dramas. ... Peter Grimwade (died May 15th 1990) was a British television writer and director, best known for his work on the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Marc Platt Marc Platt is a British writer. ... Ben Denis Aaronovitch (born 1964) is a London-born British writer who has worked on television series including Doctor Who, Casualty, Jupiter Moon and Dark Knight. ...


The serial format changed for the 2005 revival, with each series consisting of thirteen 45-minute, self-contained episodes (60 minutes, with adverts, on overseas commercial channels). Each series includes several standalone and multi-part stories, linked with a loose story arc that resolves in the series finale. As in the early "classic" era, each episode — whether standalone or part of a larger story — has its own title. Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ...


747 Doctor Who installments have been televised since 1963, ranging from 25-minute episodes (the most common format), to 45-minute episodes (for Resurrection of the Daleks in the 1984 series, a single season in 1985, and the revival), to two feature-length productions (1983's "The Five Doctors" and the 1996 television movie), to the two 60-minute Christmas specials produced for the revival and the more recent 72 minute 2007 Christmas Special. Resurrection of the Daleks is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in two weekly parts from February 8 to February 15, 1984. ... The Five Doctors was a special movie-length episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, produced in celebration of the programmes twentieth anniversary. ... Doctor Who (film) redirects here. ... A Christmas television special is typically a one_time, 30 minute animated program aired during the Christmas season. ...


The current series is recorded in 576i25 DigiBeta wide-screen format and then filmised to give a 25p image in post-production using a Snell & Wilcox Alchemist Platinum. Sony Betacam-SP VTP BVW-65 Betacam and VHS size comparison Betacam SP L (top), Betacam SP S (left), VHS (right) The early form of Betacam tapes are interchangeable with Betamax, though the recordings are not. ... Filmizing (a. ... Snell & Wilcox is a company that design and develop infrastructure solutions for digital media markets. ...


Missing episodes

The First Doctor (William Hartnell) collapses prior to his regeneration. (From the surviving clip of The Tenth Planet, episode 4.)
The First Doctor (William Hartnell) collapses prior to his regeneration. (From the surviving clip of The Tenth Planet, episode 4.)

Between about 1967 and 1978, large amounts of older material stored in the BBC's various video tape and film libraries were either destroyed[35] or simply wiped. This included many old episodes of Doctor Who, mostly stories featuring the first three Doctors — William Hartnell, Patrick Troughton and Jon Pertwee. Following consolidations and recoveries the archives are complete from the programme's move to colour television (starting from Jon Pertwee's time as the Doctor), although a few Pertwee episodes have required substantial restoration; a handful have been recovered only as black and white films, and several survive in colour only as NTSC copies recovered from North America (a few of which are domestic, off-air Betamax tape recordings, not transmission quality). In all, 108 of 253 episodes produced during the first six years of the programme are not held in the BBC's archives. It has been reported that in 1972 almost all episodes then made were known to exist at the BBC,[36] whilst by 1978 the practice of wiping tapes had ended.[37] Material from missing Doctor Who serials has seen release in books, and in audio form on CD, and two episodes have been animated for DVD release. ... The start of the First Doctors regeneration scene, from the missing Doctor Who serial The Tenth Planet. ... The start of the First Doctors regeneration scene, from the missing Doctor Who serial The Tenth Planet. ... Wiping or junking is an economic move by radio and television companies in which old audiotapes, videotapes and telerecordings (kinescopes), which were extremely expensive in the 1960s and 1970s, are erased and reused, or destroyed after several uses. ... For the Californio, see William Edward Petty Hartnell. ... Patrick George Troughton (25 March 1920 – 28 March 1987) was a versatile and prolific English actor known in his role as the second incarnation of the Doctor in the long running British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which he played from 1966 until 1969. ... John Devon Roland Pertwee (7 July 1919 – 20 May 1996), better known as Jon Pertwee, was an English actor. ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in the United States, Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, and some other countries (see map). ... This is a list of Doctor Who serials that, as far as is known, no longer exist in the form that they were transmitted (that is, serials that are incomplete in the archives). ...


Some episodes have been returned to the BBC from the archives of other countries who bought copies for broadcast, or by private individuals who got them by various means. Early colour videotape recordings made off-air by fans have also been retrieved, as well as excerpts filmed from the television screen onto 8 mm cine film and clips that were shown on other programmes. Audio versions of all of the lost episodes exist from home viewers who made tape recordings of the show. Ciné (sometimes Cine) is usually used to refer to one or more of the home movie formats including 8 mm, 9. ...


In addition to these, there are off-screen photographs made by photographer John Cura, who was hired by various production personnel to document many of their programmes during the 1950s and 1960s, including Doctor Who. These have been used in fan reconstructions of the serials. These amateur reconstructions have been tolerated by the BBC, provided they are not sold for profit and are distributed as low quality VHS copies. Alberto Giovanni Cura, better known as Albert John Cura or John Cura was born on 9 April 1902 in London, UK and died of colon cancer on 21 April 1969, in London, UK. Cura was a musician, having led a dance band in the 1930s, was enlisted in the Royal... Material from missing Doctor Who serials has seen release in books, and in audio form on CD, and two episodes have been animated for DVD release. ...

The animated reconstruction of The Invasion
The animated reconstruction of The Invasion

One of the most sought-after lost episodes is Part Four of the last William Hartnell serial, The Tenth Planet (1966), which ends with the First Doctor transforming into the Second. The only portion of this in existence, barring a few poor quality silent 8 mm clips, is the few seconds of the regeneration scene, as it was shown on the children's magazine show Blue Peter. With the approval of the BBC, efforts are now under way to restore as many of the episodes as possible from the extant material. Starting in the early 1990s, the BBC began to release audio recordings of missing serials on cassette and compact disc, with linking narration provided by former series actors. "Official" reconstructions have also been released by the BBC on VHS, on MP3 CD-ROM and as a special feature on a DVD. The BBC, in conjunction with animation studio Cosgrove Hall has reconstructed the missing Episodes 1 and 4 of The Invasion (1968) in animated form, using remastered audio tracks and the comprehensive stage notes for the original filming, for the serial's DVD release in November 2006. Although no similar reconstructions have been announced as of early 2007, Cosgrove Hall has expressed an interest in animating more lost episodes in the future,[38] despite the announcement in April 2007 that this project is on indefinite hiatus. Image File history File links Anim_doczoe. ... Image File history File links Anim_doczoe. ... The Invasion is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in eight weekly parts from November 2 to December 21, 1968. ... The Tenth Planet is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 8 to October 29, 1966. ... The First Doctor is the name given to the first incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... The Second Doctor is the name given to the second incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... For other uses, see Blue Peter (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... Cosgrove Hall Films is an animation studio based in Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester that is a major producer of childrens television programmes. ... The Invasion is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in eight weekly parts from November 2 to December 21, 1968. ...


In April 2006, Blue Peter launched a challenge to find these missing episodes with the promise of a full scale Dalek model.[39] This article is about the fictional species. ...


Characters

The Doctor

Main article: Doctor (Doctor Who)

The character of the Doctor was initially shrouded in mystery. All that was known about him in the programme's early days was that he was an eccentric alien traveller of great intelligence who battled injustice while exploring time and space in an unreliable old time machine called the TARDIS, an acronym for Time And Relative Dimension(s) In Space. The TARDIS is much larger on the inside than on the outside[40], and, due to a malfunction of its Chameleon Circuit, is stuck in the shape of a 1950s-style British police box. This article is about the character of the Doctor. ... Image File history File links 10dr19. ... Image File history File links 10dr19. ... For the Californio, see William Edward Petty Hartnell. ... Patrick George Troughton (25 March 1920 – 28 March 1987) was a versatile and prolific English actor known in his role as the second incarnation of the Doctor in the long running British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which he played from 1966 until 1969. ... John Devon Roland Pertwee (7 July 1919 – 20 May 1996), better known as Jon Pertwee, was an English actor. ... For other persons named Tom Baker, see Tom Baker (disambiguation). ... Peter Davison (born Peter Moffett 13 April 1951) is an English actor, best known for his roles as Tristan Farnon in the television version of James Herriots All Creatures Great and Small and as the fifth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who, which he played from 1981 to... For the Wales international football player see Colin Baker (Welsh footballer) Colin Baker (born London, June 8, 1943) is an English actor who is best known for playing the sixth incarnation of the Doctor in the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who, from 1984 to 1986. ... Sylvester McCoy (born Percy James Patrick Kent-Smith August 20, 1943) is a Scottish actor. ... Paul McGann (born November 14, 1959 in Surrey, England, United Kingdom) is an English actor who made his name on the BBC serial The Monocled Mutineer, in which he played the lead role. ... Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor. ... David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... The current TARDIS prop. ... A Chameleon Circuit is a fictional device from the television sci-fi series Doctor Who. ... A police box is a telephone kiosk or callbox for use by members of the police. ...


However, not only did the initially irascible and slightly sinister Doctor quickly mellow into a more compassionate figure, it was eventually revealed that he had been on the run from his own people, the Time Lords of the planet Gallifrey. This article is about the Time Lords from Doctor Who. ... This article is about the fictional planet. ...


As a Time Lord, the Doctor has the ability to regenerate his body when near death. Introduced into the storyline as a way of continuing the series when the writers were faced with the departure of lead actor William Hartnell in 1966, it has continued to be a major element of the series, allowing for the recasting of the lead actor when the need arises. The serial The Deadly Assassin established that a Time Lord can regenerate twelve times, for a total of thirteen incarnations (although at least one Time Lord, The Master, has managed to circumvent this). To date, the Doctor has gone through this process and its resulting after-effects on nine occasions, with each of his incarnations having his own quirks and abilities but otherwise sharing the memories and experience of the previous incarnations: Regeneration, in the context of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, is a biological ability exhibited by the Time Lords, a race of humanoids originating on the planet Gallifrey. ... For the Californio, see William Edward Petty Hartnell. ... The Deadly Assassin is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 30 to November 20, 1976. ... This article is about the character. ...

  1. First Doctor, played by William Hartnell (1963–1966)
  2. Second Doctor, played by Patrick Troughton (1966–1969)
  3. Third Doctor, played by Jon Pertwee (1970–1974)
  4. Fourth Doctor, played by Tom Baker (1974–1981)
  5. Fifth Doctor, played by Peter Davison (1981–1984)
  6. Sixth Doctor, played by Colin Baker (1984–1986)
  7. Seventh Doctor, played by Sylvester McCoy (1987–1989, 1996)[41][42][43]
  8. Eighth Doctor, played by Paul McGann (1996)
  9. Ninth Doctor, played by Christopher Eccleston (2005)
  10. Tenth Doctor, played by David Tennant (2005–2008) [15]

Other actors have also played the Doctor, though rarely more than once (see the list of actors who have played the Doctor). The First Doctor is the name given to the first incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... For the Californio, see William Edward Petty Hartnell. ... The Second Doctor is the name given to the second incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Patrick George Troughton (25 March 1920 – 28 March 1987) was a versatile and prolific English actor known in his role as the second incarnation of the Doctor in the long running British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which he played from 1966 until 1969. ... The Third Doctor is the name given to the third incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... John Devon Roland Pertwee (7 July 1919 – 20 May 1996), better known as Jon Pertwee, was an English actor. ... The Fourth Doctor is the name given to the fourth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... For other persons named Tom Baker, see Tom Baker (disambiguation). ... The Fifth Doctor is the name given to the fifth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Peter Davison (born Peter Moffett 13 April 1951) is an English actor, best known for his roles as Tristan Farnon in the television version of James Herriots All Creatures Great and Small and as the fifth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who, which he played from 1981 to... The Sixth Doctor is the name given to the sixth incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... For the Wales international football player see Colin Baker (Welsh footballer) Colin Baker (born London, June 8, 1943) is an English actor who is best known for playing the sixth incarnation of the Doctor in the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who, from 1984 to 1986. ... The Seventh Doctor is a fictional character, the seventh incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Sylvester McCoy (born Percy James Patrick Kent-Smith August 20, 1943) is a Scottish actor. ... The Eighth Doctor is a fictional character, the eighth incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Paul McGann (born November 14, 1959 in Surrey, England, United Kingdom) is an English actor who made his name on the BBC serial The Monocled Mutineer, in which he played the lead role. ... The Ninth Doctor refers to the ninth official incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor. ... The Tenth Doctor is the name given to the tenth and current incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... The ten faces of the Doctor on television Clockwise from top-left: William Hartnell, Patrick Troughton, Jon Pertwee, Tom Baker, Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy, Paul McGann, Christopher Eccleston and David Tennant. ...


Despite these shifts in personality, the Doctor remains an intensely curious and highly moral adventurer who would rather solve problems with his wits than by using violence.


Throughout the programme's long history there have been controversial revelations about the Doctor. For example, in The Brain of Morbius (1976), it was hinted that the First Doctor may not have been the Doctor's first incarnation (although the other faces depicted may have been incarnations of the Time Lord Morbius); during the Seventh Doctor's era it was hinted that the Doctor was more than just an ordinary Time Lord. In the Eighth Doctor movie, the Doctor described himself as being "half human".[44] The revelation has become controversial amongst series fans, given that there have been no references to the concept during the original or revived television series.[45] The very first episode, An Unearthly Child, revealed that the Doctor has a granddaughter, Susan Foreman, and in "Fear Her" (2006), he remarked that he had, in the past, been a father. The 2005 series revealed that the Ninth Doctor thought he had become the last surviving Time Lord, and that his home planet had been destroyed. In the 2008 series episode "The Doctor's Daughter", the Doctor's cells are used to produce a daughter (played by Georgia Moffett, the real-life daughter of Fifth Doctor actor Peter Davison) who is subsequently named Jenny by Donna as a result of the Doctor describing her as "a generated anomaly". The Brain of Morbius is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from January 3 to January 24, 1976. ... The First Doctor is the name given to the first incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... The Seventh Doctor is a fictional character, the seventh incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... The Eighth Doctor is a fictional character, the eighth incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... An Unearthly Child (also known as 100,000 BC, among other titles, see below) is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from 23 November to 14 December 1963. ... Susan Foreman is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Fear Her is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Ninth Doctor refers to the ninth official incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Georgia Elizabeth Moffett (born December 25, 1984 in west London) is an English actress and the daughter of actors Peter Davison and Sandra Dickinson. ... The Fifth Doctor is the name given to the fifth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Peter Davison (born Peter Moffett 13 April 1951) is an English actor, best known for his roles as Tristan Farnon in the television version of James Herriots All Creatures Great and Small and as the fifth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who, which he played from 1981 to... This is a list of villains from the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...


Companions

The Doctor almost always shares his adventures with up to three companions, and since 1963 more than 35 actors and actresses have featured in these roles. The First Doctor's original companions were his granddaughter Susan Foreman (Carole Ann Ford) and school teachers Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) and Ian Chesterton (William Russell). The only story from the original series in which the Doctor travels alone is The Deadly Assassin. Companion, in the long-running BBC television science fiction programme Doctor Who and related works, is a term used to describe a character who travels with and shares the adventures of the Doctor. ... Companion, in the long-running BBC television science fiction programme Doctor Who and related works, is a term used to describe a character who travels with and shares the adventures of the Doctor. ... Susan Foreman is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Carole Ann Ford (born June 1940) is a British actress best known for her role as Susan Foreman in the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Barbara Wright is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and a companion of the First Doctor. ... Jacqueline Hill Jacqueline Hill (born 17 December 1929, died 18 February 1993) is a British actress best known for her role as Barbara Wright in the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Ian Chesterton is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and a companion of the First Doctor. ... William Russell (born Russell Enoch on November 19, 1924 in Sunderland, England, UK) is a British actor, mainly known for his television work. ... The Deadly Assassin is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 30 to November 20, 1976. ...


Dramatically, the companion characters provide a surrogate with whom the audience can identify, and serves to further the story by requesting exposition from the Doctor and manufacturing peril for the Doctor to resolve. The Doctor regularly gains new companions and loses old ones; sometimes they return home or find new causes — or loves — on worlds they have visited. Some have even died during the course of the series. Companion, in the long-running BBC television science fiction programme Doctor Who and related works, is a term used to describe a character who travels with and shares the adventures of the Doctor. ... In the study of literature, an audience surrogate is a character who expresses the questions and confusion of the reader. ...


Although the majority of the Doctor's companions have been young, attractive females, the production team for the 1963–1989 series maintained a long-standing taboo against any overt romantic involvement in the TARDIS. The taboo was controversially broken in the 1996 television film when the Eighth Doctor was shown kissing companion Grace Holloway. The 2005 series played with this idea by having various characters think that the Ninth Doctor and Rose (played by Billie Piper) were a couple, which they vehemently denied (see also "The Doctor and romance"). The idea of a possible involvement was suggested again in "Smith and Jones", when the Tenth Doctor kisses his soon-to-be new companion Martha Jones, although the Doctor insists that the kiss was simply for the purpose of 'genetic transfer'. In "The Unicorn and the Wasp", the Doctor is kissed by Donna Noble to shock him in order to neutralise a poison in his system. The Eighth Doctor is a fictional character, the eighth incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Dr. Grace Holloway is a fictional character played by Daphne Ashbrook in the 1996 television movie Doctor Who, a continuation of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Ninth Doctor refers to the ninth official incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Rose is an episode in the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on 26 March 2005. ... Billie Paul Piper (born Leanne Paul Piper[1] on 22 September 1982) is an British actress. ... This article is about the character of the Doctor. ... Smith and Jones is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Tenth Doctor is the name given to the tenth and current incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Martha Jones is a fictional character played by Freema Agyeman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, and will appear in its spin-off series, Torchwood. ... Donna Noble is a fictional character played by Catherine Tate in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...


Previous companions reappeared in the series, usually for anniversary specials. One former companion, Sarah Jane Smith (played by Elisabeth Sladen), together with the robotic dog K-9, appeared in an episode of the 2006 series more than twenty years after their last appearances in the 20th Anniversary story "The Five Doctors" (1983). Afterwards, the character was featured in the spinoff series The Sarah Jane Adventures. Sladen once again appeared as Sarah Jane in the final two episodes of the fourth season of the new Doctor Who, with K-9 appearing briefly in the final episode, "Journey's End". Sarah Jane Smith is a fictional character played by Elisabeth Sladen in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and its related spin-offs. ... Elisabeth Sladen (born February 1, 1948, Liverpool, England) is an English actress best known for her work as the character Sarah Jane Smith on the television series Doctor Who and related spin-offs. ... For the television series, see K-9 (TV series). ... School Reunion is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Five Doctors was a special movie-length episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, produced in celebration of the programmes twentieth anniversary. ... The Sarah Jane Adventures is a British television series, produced by BBC Wales for CBBC, starring Elisabeth Sladen and created by Russell T. Davies. ...


The most recent companions of the Tenth Doctor (David Tennant) are Martha Jones (Freema Agyeman), and Captain Jack Harkness (John Barrowman), both of whom depart at the end of "Last of the Time Lords". Catherine Tate reprised her role as Donna Noble from the 2006 Christmas special, becoming the Doctor's companion for the entire run of the fourth series.[6] Agyeman appeared as Martha Jones in three episodes of the spin-off series Torchwood before returning to Doctor Who halfway through the fourth series.[46].[47] Billie Piper briefly reprised her role as Rose Tyler in the Series 4 episode Partners in Crime and returned to the series from "Turn Left" to "Journey's End".[48] For the 2007 Christmas episode "Voyage of the Damned", the Doctor's companion was Astrid Peth, played by Australian performer Kylie Minogue. David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... Martha Jones is a fictional character played by Freema Agyeman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, and will appear in its spin-off series, Torchwood. ... Freema Agyeman (born 1 January 1979 in Finsbury Park, London[2] ) is an English actress of Ghanaian and Iranian descent whose first notable appearance was in the ITV soap opera Crossroads in 2001[1]. She is best known for playing medical student Martha Jones, companion of the Tenth Doctor in... For other persons and meanings, see Jack Harkness (disambiguation). ... John Barrowman (born 11 March 1967 in Mount Vernon, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish actor, musical performer, dancer, singer, and TV presenter who has lived and worked both in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Last of the Time Lords is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... This article is about the actress. ... Donna Noble is a fictional character played by Catherine Tate in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Billie Paul Piper (born Leanne Paul Piper[1] on 22 September 1982) is an British actress. ... Rose Tyler is a fictional character played by Billie Piper in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, and was created by series producer Russell T Davies. ... Voyage of the Damned is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Kylie redirects here. ...


Though arguably not a companion, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart was a recurring character in the original series making his first appearance alongside the Second Doctor and his final alongside the Seventh. The actor Nicholas Courtney who portrayed the Brigadier had previously also starred as Bret Vyon alongside first Doctor William Hartnell in the 12-part The Daleks' Master Plan, earning him the distinction of being the only actor to appear with every doctor (except Colin Baker) of the classic series. His photo appears among Sarah Jane Smith's personal items in "The Sarah Jane Adventures." He and UNIT appeared regularly during the Third Doctor's tenure, and it has continued to appear or be referred to in the revival of the show and its spin-offs. Brigadier Sir Alastair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, played by Nicholas Courtney. ... Nicholas Courtney Nicholas Courtney (born William Nicholas Stone Courtney on December 16, 1929) is a British television actor, most famous for playing Brigadier Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Daleks Master Plan is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in twelve weekly parts from November 13, 1965 to January 29, 1966. ... The Sarah Jane Adventures is a British television series, produced by BBC Wales for CBBC, starring Elisabeth Sladen and created by Russell T. Davies. ... Look up unit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Adversaries

See also: List of Doctor Who monsters and aliens and List of Doctor Who villains
The Daleks are perhaps the best-known adversaries faced by the Doctor.
The Daleks are perhaps the best-known adversaries faced by the Doctor.

When Sydney Newman commissioned the series, he specifically did not want to perpetuate the cliché of the "bug-eyed monster" of science fiction. However, monsters were a staple of Doctor Who almost from the beginning and were popular with audiences. Notable adversaries of the Doctor in the original series include the Autons, the Cybermen, the Sontarans, the Zygons, the Sea Devils, the Silurians, the Ice Warriors, the Rani, the Yeti, Davros (the creator of the Daleks), the Master (a Time Lord with a thirst for universal conquest), and, most notably, the Daleks. This continued with the resurrection of the series in 2005. This is a list of monsters and aliens from the long-running BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The War Chief redirects here. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (680 × 850 pixel, file size: 405 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (680 × 850 pixel, file size: 405 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the fictional species. ... This is a list of monsters and aliens from the long-running BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... For the Supreme Court of Canada case, see Auton (Guardian ad litem of) v. ... The Cybermen are a fictional race of cyborgs who are amongst the most persistent enemies of the Doctor in the British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. ... The Sontarans are a fictional extraterrestrial race from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... For the academic journal, see Zygon: Journal of Religion & Science. ... The Sea Devils are a fictional race of amphibious reptile-like beings in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The name Silurians refers to a fictional race of reptile-like beings in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Ice Warriors is the name given to a fictional extraterrestrial race of reptile-like beings in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Rani is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Yeti of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, although resembling the cryptozoological creatures also called the Yeti, are in actuality alien robots. ... For the Big Finish Audio of the same name, see Davros (Doctor Who audio). ... This article is about the character. ... This article is about the fictional species. ...


Executive producer for the new series, Russell T Davies, stated that it had always been his intention to bring back classic icons of Doctor Who one step at a time: Daleks in series 1, Cybermen in series 2, and the Master in series 3. Series 1 began this trend in the very first episode "Rose" with the Autons and Nestene Consciousness from the third Doctor's "Spearhead from Space" and "Terror of the Autons." Series 3 also saw the return of the seldom-seen Macra, albeit in a subplot, last seen only once in the second Doctor's "The Macra Terror." He has also stated that he is not finished and will continue reviving villains from the original series.[49] Series 4 saw the return of the Sontarans in a double episode, and of the Daleks' creator Davros in the series finale. The new series has also introduced new monsters, including the Slitheen, the Ood, and the Judoon. American cultural icons. ... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... For the Supreme Court of Canada case, see Auton (Guardian ad litem of) v. ... Spearhead from Space is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from January 3 to January 24, 1970. ... Terror of the Autons is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from January 2 to January 23, 1971. ... The Macra Terror is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from March 11 to April 1, 1967. ... The Sontarans are a fictional extraterrestrial race from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... For the Big Finish Audio of the same name, see Davros (Doctor Who audio). ... The Slitheen are a fictional family of massive, bipedal extraterrestrials from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and adversaries of the Doctor. ... Object-oriented design (OOD) is a design method in which a system is modelled as a collection of cooperating objects and individual objects are treated as instances of a class within a class hierarchy. ... The Judoon are a fictional extraterrestrial race of humanoid mercenary police from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...


Daleks

Main article: Dalek

Of all the monsters and villains, the ones that have most secured the series' place in the public's imagination are the Daleks, who first appeared in 1963 and were the series' very first "monster". The Daleks are Kaled mutants in tank-like mechanical armour shells from the planet Skaro. Their chief role in the great scheme of things, as they frequently remark in their instantly recognisable metallic voices, is to "Exterminate!" all beings inferior to themselves, even destroying the Time Lords in the often referenced but never shown Time War. Davros, the Daleks' creator, became a recurring villain after he was introduced in Genesis of the Daleks, in which the Time Lords send the Doctor back to either destroy the Daleks, avert their creation, or tamper with their genetic structure to make them less warlike. Davros has been played by Michael Wisher (first introduced in Genesis of the Daleks), David Gooderson (Destiny of the Daleks), and Terry Molloy. Davros returned to Doctor Who portrayed by Julian Bleach in the 2008 episodes "The Stolen Earth" and "Journey's End". This article is about the fictional species. ... This article is about the fictional species. ... Skaro is a fictional planet from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who created by the writer Terry Nation as the home planet of the Daleks and, at times, the centre of the Dalek Empire. ... This article is about the Time Lords from Doctor Who. ... Combatants Time Lords Dalek Empire Commanders President of Gallifrey Dalek Emperor Casualties Virtually the entire Time Lord population; the Doctor and the Master are known survivors. ... For the Big Finish Audio of the same name, see Davros (Doctor Who audio). ... Genesis of the Daleks is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was originally broadcast in six weekly parts from March 8 to April 12, 1975. ... Michael Wisher played Davros, wheelchair-bound scientific mastermind and creator of the Daleks, in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who in the 1975 serial, Genesis Of The Daleks ... David Gooderson is a British actor who has appeared in several television roles. ... Destiny of the Daleks is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from September 1 to September 22, 1979. ... Terry Molloy, with an original Davros mask, at a Doctor Who in-store sigining event on 1st December 2007. ...


The Daleks were created by writer Terry Nation (who intended them as an allegory of the Nazis)[50] and BBC designer Raymond Cusick. The Daleks' début in the programme's second serial, The Daleks (1963–64), caused a tremendous reaction in the viewing figures and the public, putting Doctor Who on the cultural map. A Dalek appeared on a postage stamp celebrating British popular culture in 1999, photographed by Lord Snowdon. Terry Nation (August 8, 1930 – March 9, 1997) was a British television screenwriter and is probably best known for creating the villainous Daleks for the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Not to be confused with Nasi. ... Raymond Cusick, also known as Ray Cusick or Raymond P. Cusick, was a designer for the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... This article is about the serial. ... Lord Snowdon redirects here. ...


Cybermen

Main article: Cybermen

Cybermen were originally a wholly organic species of humanoids originating on Earth's twin planet Mondas that began to implant more and more artificial parts into their bodies. This led to the race becoming coldly logical and calculating, with emotions usually only shown when naked aggression was called for. The new series, starting in 2005, introduced a totally new variation of Cybermen created in a parallel universe. The Cybermen - 1966 vintage (from The Moonbase). ...


The Master

Main article: Master (Doctor Who)

The Master is a renegade Time Lord, and the Doctor's nemesis. Conceived as "Professor Moriarty to the Doctor's Sherlock Holmes,"[51] the character first appeared in 1971. As with the Doctor, the role has been portrayed by several actors, the first being Roger Delgado who continued in the role until his death in 1973. The Master was briefly played by Peter Pratt and Geoffrey Beevers until Anthony Ainley took over and continued to play the character until Doctor Who's cancellation in 1989. The Master returned in the 1996 television movie of Doctor Who, played by Gordon Tipple in the pre-credits sequence, then Eric Roberts, and in the three-part finale of the 2007 series, portrayed by Derek Jacobi, who then regenerated into John Simm at the conclusion of the episode "Utopia". This article is about the character. ... This article is about the character. ... This article is about the Time Lords from Doctor Who. ... Professor Moriarty, illustration by Sidney Paget which accompanied the original publication of The Final Problem. Professor James Moriarty is a fictional character who is the best known antagonist (and archenemy) of the detective Sherlock Holmes. ... This article is about Arthur Conan Doyles fictional detective. ... Roger Caesar Marius Bernard de Delgado Torres Castillo Roberto (March 1, 1918 – June 18, 1973) was a British actor, best known for his role as the Master in Doctor Who. ... Peter Pratt (March 21, 1923 – January 11, 1995) was a British actor and bass singer who started his career in the Gilbert and Sullivan operettas but later moved to radio and television work. ... Geoffrey Beevers is a British actor who has appeared in many different television roles. ... Anthony Ainley (20 August 1932 – 3 May 2004) was an English actor best known for his work on British television and particularly for his role as the Master in Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who (film) redirects here. ... Eric Anthony Roberts (born on April 18, 1956, in Biloxi, Mississippi) is an Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actor. ... Sir Derek George Jacobi, CBE (IPA: ) (born 22 October 1938) is an English actor and director, knighted in 1994 for his services to the theatre. ... John Ronald Simm (born 10 July 1970 in Leeds, West Yorkshire) is an English actor and musician. ... Utopia is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...


Music

Theme music

 Audio sample composed by Ron Grainer:

Doctor Who theme excerpt The Doctor Who theme music was created in 1963, composed by Ron Grainer and realised with electronics by Delia Derbyshire of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. ... Image File history File links Doctor_Who_theme_excerpt. ...

An excerpt from the theme music to Doctor Who
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

The original 1963 radiophonic arrangement of the Doctor Who theme is widely regarded as a significant and innovative piece of electronic music, and Doctor Who was the first television series in the world to have a theme entirely realised through electronic means. The BBC Radiophonic Workshop, one of the sound effects units of the BBC, was created in 1958 to produce effects and new music for radio, and was closed in March 1998, although much of its traditional work had already been outsourced by 1995. ...


The original theme was composed by Ron Grainer and realised by Delia Derbyshire at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, with assistance from Dick Mills. The various parts were built up by creating tape loops of an individually struck piano string and individual test oscillators and filters. The Derbyshire arrangement served, with minor edits, as the theme tune up to the end of Season 17 (1979–80). Ron Grainer (August 11, 1922 - February 21, 1981) was an Australian-born composer who worked for most of his professional career in the United Kingdom. ... Delia Ann Derbyshire (5 May 1937 - 3 July 2001) was a British musician and composer who was a pioneer of electronic music. ... The BBC Radiophonic Workshop, one of the sound effects units of the BBC, was created in 1958 to produce effects and new music for radio, and was closed in March 1998, although much of its traditional work had already been outsourced by 1995. ... Dick Mills (born 1936) is a British sound engineer and composer, specialising in electronic sound effects which he produced at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ... Oscillation is the variation, typically in time, of some measure about a central value (often a point of equilibrium) or between two or more different states. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ...


A more modern and dynamic arrangement was composed by Peter Howell for Season 18 (1980), which was in turn replaced by Dominic Glynn's arrangement for Season 23's The Trial of a Time Lord (1986). Keff McCulloch provided the new arrangement for the Seventh Doctor's era which lasted from Season 24 (1987) until the series' suspension in 1989. For the new series in 2005, Murray Gold provided a new arrangement which featured samples from the 1963 original with further elements added; in the 2005 Christmas episode "The Christmas Invasion", Gold introduced a modified closing credits arrangement that was used up until the conclusion of the 2007 series. Peter Howell is a television composer who is best known for his work on Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... Dominic Glynn is a British composer, known for his new arrangement of the Doctor Who theme music which served as the series theme for Season 23 of the programme. ... The Trial of a Time Lord is the on-screen title for all fourteen episodes comprising the 23rd season (1986) of the original Doctor Who series. ... Keff McCulloch is a British composer. ... The Seventh Doctor is a fictional character, the seventh incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... Murray Gold (born 1969, Portsmouth, England) is a British composer for stage, film, and television and a dramatist for both theatre and radio. ... The Christmas Invasion is a 60-minute special episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...


A new arrangement of the theme, once again by Gold, was introduced in the 2007 Christmas special episode, "Voyage of the Damned". Voyage of the Damned is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...


Versions of the "Doctor Who Theme" have also been released in a pop music venue over the years. In the early 1970s, Jon Pertwee, who had played the Third Doctor, recorded a version of the Doctor Who theme with spoken lyrics, titled, "Who Is the Doctor". In 1988 the band The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu (later known as The KLF) released the single "Doctorin' the Tardis" under the name The Timelords, which reached No. 1 in the UK and No. 2 in Australia; this version incorporated several other songs, including "Rock and Roll Part 2" by Gary Glitter (who recorded vocals for some of the CD-single remix versions of "Doctorin' the Tardis").[52] Others who have covered or reinterpreted the theme include Orbital,[52] Pink Floyd,[52] the Australian string ensemble Fourplay, New Zealand punk band Blam Blam Blam, The Pogues, and the comedians Bill Bailey and Mitch Benn, and it and obsessive fans were satirised on The Chaser's War on Everything. A reggae/ska version of the Doctor Who theme tune was released on the Explosion label in 1969 by Bongo Herman and Les. The theme tune has also appeared on many compilation CDs and has made its way into mobile phone ring tones. Fans have also produced and distributed their own remixes of the theme. This article is about the genre of popular music. ... John Devon Roland Pertwee (7 July 1919 – 20 May 1996), better known as Jon Pertwee, was an English actor. ... The Third Doctor is the name given to the third incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... KLF redirects here. ... KLF redirects here. ... “The Timelords” redirects here. ... “The Timelords” redirects here. ... Gary Glitter (born Paul Francis Gadd May 8, 1944) is an English rock and pop singer and songwriter who had a string of chart successes with a collection of 1970s glam rock hits including Rock and Roll parts 1 & 2, I Love You Love Me Love, Im the Leader... Orbital was an English techno duo from 1989 until 2004, consisting of brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... FourPlay Electric String Quartet is a four-piece rock band from Sydney, Australia, formed in 1995. ... Blam Blam Blam were a New Zealand pop/rock/alternative band. ... The Pogues are a band of mixed Irish and English background, playing traditional Irish folk with influences from the English punk rock movement. ... For other uses, see Bill Bailey (disambiguation). ... Mitch Benn (born Mitchell John Benn 20 January 1970) is a British musician of Liverpudlian/Scottish descent and stand-up comedian known for his satirical songs performed on BBC radio. ... The Chasers War on Everything is a satirical television comedy series broadcast on ABC TV in Australia. ...


Incidental music

Most of the innovative incidental music for Doctor Who has been specially commissioned from freelance composers, although in the early years some episodes also used stock music, as well as occasional excerpts from original recordings or cover versions of songs by popular music acts such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys. Royalty-free music commonly refers to stock or library music licensed for a single fee, without the need to pay any subsequent royalties. ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ...


The incidental music for the first Doctor Who adventure, An Unearthly Child, was written by Norman Kay. Many of the stories of the William Hartnell period were scored by electronic music pioneer Tristram Cary, whose Doctor Who credits include The Daleks, Marco Polo, The Daleks' Master Plan, The Gunfighters and The Mutants. Other composers in this early period were included Richard Rodney Bennett, Carey Blyton and Geoffrey Burgon. Norman Kay (5 January 1929–12 May 2001) was a British composer. ... For the Californio, see William Edward Petty Hartnell. ... Tristram Cary (born 14th May 1925) is a British composer living in Australia. ... Marco Polo is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in 7 weekly parts from February 22 to April 4, 1964. ... For the Brazilian tropicalia band see Os Mutantes The Mutants is a serial from the ninth season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, featuring Jon Pertwee as the Doctor. ... Sir Richard Rodney Bennett (born March 29, 1936) is a British composer. ... Carey Blyton (14 March 1932- 13 July 2002) was a British composer and writer best known for his song Bananas In Pyjamas which later became a Australian childrens television series, and for his work on Doctor Who. ... Geoffrey Burgon (16 July 1941 - ) is a British composer, famous for television and film themes. ...


The most frequent musical contributor during the first fifteen years was Dudley Simpson, who is also well known for his theme and incidental music for Blake's 7, and for his haunting theme music and score for the original 1970s version of The Tomorrow People. Simpson's first Doctor Who score was Planet of Giants (1964) and he went on to write music for many adventures of the Sixties and Seventies, including most of the stories of the Jon Pertwee / Tom Baker periods, ending with The Horns of Nimon (1979). He also made a cameo appearance in The Talons of Weng-Chiang (as a Music hall conductor). Dudley Simpson is a television composer who is best known for his work on Doctor Who. ... Blakes 7 is a British science fiction television series made by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for their BBC 1 channel. ... The Tomorrow People is a childrens science fiction television series, devised by Roger Price and produced by Thames Television for Britains ITV network between 1973 and 1979. ... Planet of Giants is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in three weekly parts from October 31 to November 14, 1964. ... The Horns of Nimon is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from December 22, 1979 to January 12, 1980. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ...


Beginning with The Leisure Hive (1980), the task of creating incidental music was assigned to the Radiophonic Workshop. Paddy Kingsland and Peter Howell contributed many scores in this period and other contributors included Roger Limb, Malcolm Clarke and Jonathan Gibbs. The Leisure Hive is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from August 30 to September 20, 1980. ... Paddy Kingsland is a composer of electronic music best known for his incidental music for science fiction series on BBC radio and TV, including two versions of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy: the second radio series and the TV adaptation, as well as several serials of Doctor Who. ... Peter Howell is a television composer who is best known for his work on Doctor Who. ... Roger Limb is a British composer, specialising in electronic music. ... Malcolm Clarke (born 1943) was a British composer, and a member of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop for 25 years from 1969 to 1994. ... Jonathan Gibbs is a British composer. ...


The Radiophonic Workshop was dropped after the The Trial of a Time Lord season, and Keff McCulloch took over as the series' main composer, with Dominic Glynn and Mark Ayres also contributing scores. The Trial of a Time Lord is the on-screen title for all fourteen episodes comprising the 23rd season (1986) of the original Doctor Who series. ... Keff McCulloch is a British composer. ... Dominic Glynn is a British composer, known for his new arrangement of the Doctor Who theme music which served as the series theme for Season 23 of the programme. ... Mark Ayres is a television composer who is best known for his work on Doctor Who. ...


All the incidental music for the 2005 revived series has been composed by Murray Gold and Ben Foster and has been performed by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales from the 2005 Christmas episode The Christmas Invasion onwards. A concert featuring the orchestra performing music from the first two series took place on 19 November 2006 to raise money for Children in Need. David Tennant hosted the event, introducing the different sections of the concert. Murray Gold and Russell T Davies answered questions during the interval and Daleks and Cybermen menaced the audience whilst music from their stories was played. The concert aired on BBCi on Christmas Day 2006. is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... New BBC Children in Need Pudsey and logo from 2007 BBC Children in Need is an annual British charity appeal organised by the BBC. Since 1980 it has raised £470million. ... David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... Murray Gold (born 1969, Portsmouth, England) is a British composer for stage, film, and television and a dramatist for both theatre and radio. ... Russell T Davies, OBE (born Steven Russell Davies,[1] 27 April 1963), is a Welsh television producer and writer. ... This article is about the fictional species. ... The Cybermen are a fictional race of cyborgs who are amongst the most persistent enemies of the Doctor in the British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. ... BBCi is the brand name for the BBCs interactive television services. ...


The new series has featured occasional use of excerpts of pop music from the Seventies, Eighties, Nineties and early 2000s, including works by Ian Dury and the Blockheads, Electric Light Orchestra, Soft Cell, Rogue Traders, Britney Spears and the Scissor Sisters. The soundtrack for Series 1 and 2 was released on 4 December 2006 by Silva Screen Records.[53][54] The soundtrack for Series 3 was released on 5 November 2007. Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick is a song and single by Ian Dury & The Blockheads, first released November 23, 1978 and was first released on the 7 single BUY 38 Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick / There Aint Half Been Some Clever Bastards by Stiff Records. ... Mr. ... Tainted Love is a song composed by Gloria Jones in 1964. ... Voodoo Child is a dance song written by Elvis Costello, James Ash and Steve Davis, produced by Ash for the Rogue Traders second album Here Come the Drums and was the first single for the new member Natalie Bassingthwaighte. ... Audio sample Info Toxic (help· info) Toxic is a British and American Grammy Award-winning dance-pop song written by Bloodshy & Avant, Cathy Dennis, and Henrik Jonback for Britney Spears fourth studio album In the Zone (2003). ... Ta-Dah is the second studio album by American 5-piece band Scissor Sisters, released in September 2006. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Silva Screen Records is a London based independent record label which is one of the world’s leading film and television specialist soundtrack companies. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Special sound

Doctor Who's science-fiction themes and settings meant that many sound effects had to be specially created for the series, although some common sound effects (such as crowds, horses and jungle noises) were sourced from stock recordings. Because Doctor Who began several years before the advent of the first mass-produced synthesizers, much of the equipment used to create electronic sound effects in the early days was custom-built by the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and until the early 1970s audio effects were produced using a combination of electronic and radiophonic techniques. Synth redirects here. ... The BBC Radiophonic Workshop, one of the sound effects units of the BBC, was created in 1958 to produce effects and new music for radio, and was closed in March 1998, although much of its traditional work had already been outsourced by 1995. ...


Almost all of the original sound effects and audio backgrounds during the 1960s were overseen by the Radiophonic Workshop's Brian Hodgson, who worked on Doctor Who from its inception until the middle of Jon Pertwee's tenure in the early 1970s, when he was succeeded by Dick Mills. Hodgson created hundreds of pieces of "special sound" ranging from ray-gun blasts to dinosaurs, but without doubt his best known sound effects are the sound of the TARDIS as it de-materialises and re-appears, and the voices of the Daleks. Brian Hodgson is a British television composer and sound technician. ... Dick Mills (born 1936) is a British sound engineer and composer, specialising in electronic sound effects which he produced at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. ... This article is about the fictional species. ...


The basic audio source Hodgson used for the TARDIS effect was the sound of his house keys being scraped up and down along the strings of an old gutted piano, and played backwards. The famous Dalek voice effect was obtained by passing the actors' voices through a device called a ring modulator, and it was further enhanced by exploiting the distortion inherent in the microphones and amplifiers then in use. However, the precise sonic character of the Daleks' voices varied somewhat over time because the original frequency settings used on the ring modulator were never noted down. Ring modulation is an audio effect performed by multiplying two audio signals, where one is typically a sine-wave or another simple waveform. ... For other uses, see Distortion (disambiguation). ...


Viewership

The image of the TARDIS is iconic in British popular culture.
The image of the TARDIS is iconic in British popular culture.

Doctor Who has always appeared on the BBC's mainstream BBC One channel, where it is regarded as a family show, drawing audiences of many millions of viewers. Prior to 2005, the show was most popular in the late 1970s, with audiences frequently as high as 12 million. During the ITV network strike of 1979, viewership peaked at 16 million. No first-run episode of Doctor Who has ever drawn fewer than three million viewers on BBC One, although its late 1980s performance of three to five million viewers was seen as poor at the time and was, according to the BBC Board of Control, a leading cause of the programme's 1989 suspension. Some fans considered this disingenuous, since the programme was scheduled against the soap opera Coronation Street, the most popular show at the time. After the series' revival in 2005, it has consistently had high viewership levels for the evening on which the episode is broadcast, and often attracts the most viewers on that evening. The BBC One broadcast of "Rose", the first episode of the 2005 revival, drew an average audience of 10.81 million, third highest for BBC One that week and seventh across all channels. The 2006 episode "Rise of the Cybermen" managed sixth place in the charts across the week with 9.22 million viewers.[55] The all-time highest chart placing for an episode of Doctor Who is second, for the 2007 Christmas special "Voyage Of The Damned", which received 13.31 million viewers, a feat which also made it the second most watched show of the year. The current revival also garners the highest audience Appreciation Index of any non-soap drama on television.[56] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 402 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1397 × 2084 pixel, file size: 720 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The TARDIS prop, as seen at BBC Wales reception in June 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 402 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1397 × 2084 pixel, file size: 720 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The TARDIS prop, as seen at BBC Wales reception in June 2005. ... The current TARDIS prop. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... The first TIME magazine cover devoted to soap operas, dated January 12, 1976. ... Coronation Street is an award-winning British soap opera. ... Rose is an episode in the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on 26 March 2005. ... Rise of the Cybermen is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Voyage of the Damned is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The first TIME magazine cover devoted to soap operas, dated January 12, 1976. ...


The series also has a fan base in the United States, where it was shown in syndication from the 1970s to the 1990s, particularly on PBS stations (see Doctor Who in North America). New Zealand was the first country outside the UK to screen Doctor Who beginning in September 1964, and continued to screen the series for many years, including the new series from 2005. In Canada, the series debuted in January 1965, but the CBC only aired the first twenty-six episodes. TVOntario picked up the show in 1976 beginning with The Three Doctors and aired it through to Season 24 in 1991. TVO's schedule ran several years behind the BBC's throughout this period. From 1979 to 1981, TVO airings were bookended by science-fiction writer Judith Merril who would introduce the episode and then, after the episode concluded, try to place it in an educational context in keeping with TVO's status as an educational channel. The airing of The Talons of Weng-Chiang resulted in controversy for TVOntario as a result of accusations that the story was racist. Consequently the story was not rebroadcast. CBC began showing the series again in 2005. PBS redirects here. ... TVOntario, officially the Ontario Educational Communications Authority, is an educational public television broadcaster in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Three Doctors is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, first broadcast in four weekly parts from December 30, 1972 to January 20, 1973. ... Judith Josephine Grossman (January 21, 1923 - September 12, 1997), who took the pen-name Judith Merril about 1945, was an American and then Canadian science fiction writer, editor and political activist. ... The Talons of Weng-Chiang is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts from February 26 to April 2, 1977. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota...


Likewise, a huge fan base exists in Australia, where it has been exclusively first run on the ABC, and periodically repeated - including screening all available episodes for the show's 40th anniversary in 2003. Repeats have also been shown on the subscription television channel UK.TV. The ABC also broadcasts the first run of the revived series, on ABC1, with repeats on ABC2. UK.TV also shows repeats of the revived series. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... UKTV is a subscription television channel in Australia and New Zealand, screening UK entertainment programming, sourced mainly from the archives of the BBC, TALKBACKThames and ITV Plc. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... ABC1 is a United Kingdom based television channel from Disney utilizing the branding of the Disney owned American network, ABC. The channel initially launched exclusively on the British digital terrestrial television platform Freeview on September 27, 2004. ... This article is about the Australian television channel. ... UKTV is a subscription television channel in Australia and New Zealand, screening UK entertainment programming, sourced mainly from the archives of the BBC, TALKBACKThames and ITV Plc. ...


The ABC also provided partial funding for the 20th anniversary special episode, entitled "The Five Doctors". The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ...


Only four episodes have ever had their premier showings on channels other than BBC One. The 1983 twentieth anniversary special "The Five Doctors" had its début on 23 November (the actual date of the anniversary) on the Chicago PBS station WTTW in the United States and various other PBS members two days prior to its BBC One broadcast. The 1988 story Silver Nemesis was broadcast with all three episodes edited together in compilation form on TVNZ in New Zealand in November, after the first episode had been shown in the UK but before the final two instalments had aired there. Finally, the 1996 television film premièred on 12 May 1996 on CITV in Edmonton, Canada, fifteen days before the BBC One showing, and two days before it aired on Fox in the US. The Five Doctors was a special movie-length episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, produced in celebration of the programmes twentieth anniversary. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... PBS redirects here. ... WTTW (Channel 11) is one of three PBS member stations serving the Chicago, Illinois market; the others are WYCC and WYIN. WTTW began broadcasting on March 5, 1955 and is owned and operated by Window to the World Communications Inc. ... Silver Nemesis is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in the UK in three weekly parts from November 23 (the series 25th anniversary) to December 7, 1988. ... The TVNZ Television Centre in Central Auckland. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about CITV, the Canadian television station. ... For other uses, see Edmonton (disambiguation). ... FOX redirects here. ...


A wide selection of serials is available from BBC Video on VHS and DVD, on sale in the United Kingdom, Australia, and the United States. Every fully extant serial has been released on VHS, and BBC Worldwide continues to regularly release serials on DVD. The 2005 series is also available in its entirety on UMD for the PlayStation Portable This article is about the video format. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... A UMD The Universal Media Disc (UMD) is an optical disc medium developed by Sony for use on the PlayStation Portable. ... The PlayStation Portable (officially abbreviated PSP)[5] is a handheld game console manufactured and marketed by Sony Computer Entertainment. ...


As of June 2008, the revived series had been, or was currently, broadcast weekly in Australia (ABC), Austria (Pro 7), Belgium (Één), Brazil (People+Arts), Canada in English on (CBC) and in French on (Ztélé), Croatia (Croatian Radiotelevision), Denmark (Danmarks Radio), Finland (TV2), France (France 4), Germany (Pro 7), Hong Kong (ATV World and BBC Entertainment), Hungary (RTL Klub-owned COOL TV), Iceland (RÚV), Ireland (TV3), Israel (Yes Stars 2), Italy (Jimmy), Japan (BS-2, a channel of NHK), Malaysia (Astro Network), the Netherlands (NED 3), New Zealand (Prime TV), Norway (NRK), Poland (TVP1), Portugal (People+Arts, SIC Radical), Russia (STS TV), Spain and Latin America (People+Arts), South Korea (KBS2 (dubbed in Korean) and Fox (subtitled in Korean)), Sweden (SVT), Switzerland (Pro 7), Thailand (Channel 7 and BBC Entertainment), Turkey (Cine5), the United States (Sci Fi Channel [first run], public television [second run] and BBC America [second run]), Greece (Skai TV), Style UK (part of Showtime Arabia) for the Middle East, North Africa and the Levant territories. The series has also been sold to, but not yet shown in Romania (TVR). ProSieben is a commercial television station in Germany distributed to a large extent via cable and satellite along with DVB-T (Digital Video Broadcasting - Terrestrial) in larger population centres. ... één is a public TV station in Belgium, owned by the VRT who also owns Ketnet/Canvas/Sporza. ... People+Arts is an arts television channel broadcasting to Spain, Portugal and Latin America. ... CBC Television is a Canadian English language television network. ... Ztélé is a Canadian French language cable television channel owned by Astral Media. ... Well find out Vapsva. ... DR-Byen, DRs new headquarters, under construction in Copenhagen Radiohuset buildings on Rosenørns Allé DR (formerly: Danmarks Radio) is Denmarks national broadcasting corporation. ... YLE (Yleisradio Oy) is Finlands national broadcasting company, founded in 1926. ... ProSieben is a commercial television station in Germany distributed to a large extent via cable and satellite along with DVB-T (Digital Video Broadcasting - Terrestrial) in larger population centres. ... Asia Television Limited (logo aTV) (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) was Hong Kongs first television station under Rediffusion. ... BBC Entertainment is the name of a BBC-branded general entertainment channel operated by the Corporations commercial arm, BBC Worldwide. ... RTL Klub is a television station (M-RTL Zrt. ... Ríkisútvarpið (IPA: ) or RÚV (English: The National Icelandic Broadcasting Service) is Icelands main public-service broadcaster. ... TV3 Ireland is the sole commercial terrestrial television channel in the Republic of Ireland. ... NHK Broadcasting Center in Shibuya, Tokyo NHK (, Nippon Hōsō Kyōkai), or the Japan Broadcasting Corporation, is Japans public broadcaster. ... Astro is a subscription-based direct broadcast satellite (DBS) or direct-to-home satellite television and radio service initially in Malaysia, but has expanded to Brunei and Indonesia. ... Nederland 3 (English: Netherlands 3) is the third and youngest of the terrestrial television channels operated by the Dutch public-broadcasting organization NPO and carrying programmes provided by member-based non-profit broadcasting associations. ... Prime Television New Zealand is the sixth national free-to-air television station in New Zealand. ... For the record label, see NRK Sound Division. ... TVP1 - is a television channel owned by TVP (Telewizja Polska S.A.), Polands national public broadcaster. ... People+Arts is an arts television channel broadcasting to Spain, Portugal and Latin America. ... SIC Radical is a cable TV channel in Portugal owned by SIC, which owns SIC Radical, SIC Comedia, SIC Noticias and SIC Mulher. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... People+Arts is an arts television channel broadcasting to Spain, Portugal and Latin America. ... For other uses, see KBS. Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) is South Koreas premier public broadcaster and one of four major Korean television networks. ... FOX redirects here. ... Sveriges Television (SVT) is a national publicly-funded television broadcaster based in Sweden. ... ProSieben is a commercial television station in Germany distributed to a large extent via cable and satellite along with DVB-T (Digital Video Broadcasting - Terrestrial) in larger population centres. ... Bangkok Broadcasting & Television Company Limited Channel 7 (Thai ช่อง 7) is a Thailand television channel. ... BBC Entertainment is the name of a BBC-branded general entertainment channel operated by the Corporations commercial arm, BBC Worldwide. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... SCI FI (originally The Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel) is an American cable television channel, launched in early 1992,[1] that specializes in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ... BBC America is an American television network, owned and operated by BBC Worldwide, which was launched on March 29, 1998, available on both cable and satellite. ... Skai TV is a Greek TV station, based in Athens. ... Style UK is a television channel carried on Showtime Arabias satellite service for the Middle East, North Africa, and the Levant territories. ... Showtime or Showtime Arabia (Gulf DTH F.Z. L.L.C., the operating company behind digital pay TV broadcaster Showtime) as its called to distinguish itself from its U.S. counterpart, is the dominant subscription television service in the Middle East, North Africa, and the Levant territories. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The Levant The Levant (IPA: ) is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... When looking for Romanian television, did you mean: Communications in Romania for information on the number of television sets and television usage Televiziunea Română for information on TVR, the national television network A list of Romanian television networks: ProTV and Antena1 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which...


A special logo has been designed for the Japanese broadcast with the katakana "ドクター・フー" (romanised as Dokutaa Fuu).[57] The series has apparently "mystified" viewers in Japan where it has been broadcast in a late evening time slot, leading to some not realising it is a family show.[58] Katakana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji, and in some cases the Latin alphabet. ... The romanization of Japanese or rōmaji ) ( ) is the use of the Latin alphabet to write the Japanese language. ...


The series one episodes aired in Canada a couple of weeks after their UK broadcast, a situation made possible by the 2004–05 NHL lockout which left vast gaps in CBC's schedule. For the Canadian broadcast, Christopher Eccleston recorded special video introductions for each episode (including a trivia question as part of a viewer contest) and excerpts from the Doctor Who Confidential documentary were played over the closing credits; for the broadcast of "The Christmas Invasion" on 26 December 2005, Billie Piper recorded a special video introduction. CBC began airing series two on 9 October 2006 at 8:00 pm E/P (8:30 in Newfoundland and Labrador), shortly after that day's CFL double header on Thanksgiving in most of the country. The Christmas Invasion is a 60-minute special episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Billie Paul Piper (born Leanne Paul Piper[1] on 22 September 1982) is an British actress. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lions Stampeders Eskimos Roughriders Blue Bombers Tiger-Cats Argonauts Alouettes The Canadian Football League (CFL) (Ligue canadienne de football (LCF) in French), is a professional sports league located in Canada that plays Canadian football. ... For the American holiday, see Thanksgiving (United States). ...


Series three began broadcasting on BBC One in the United Kingdom on 31 March 2007. It began broadcasting on CBC on 18 June 2007 followed by the second Christmas special, "The Runaway Bride" at midnight,[59] and the Sci Fi Channel began on 6 July 2007 starting with the second Christmas special at 8:00 pm E/P followed by the first episode.[60] is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Runaway Bride is a special episode of the long running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, starring David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Series four aired in the U.S. on the Sci-Fi Channel, in April 2008.[61] It will air on CBC Canada starting September 19, 2008.[62]


Fandom

Main article: Doctor Who fandom

Doctor Who has amassed a large number of fans from all over the world. In addition, the series is a mainstream part of popular culture in its native UK,[3] where it is is shown on the main public service broadcasting channel, BBC One. The long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who has developed a large fan base over the years. ... Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ...


Adaptations and other appearances

Dr. Who movies

Main article: Dr. Who (Dalek films)

There are two "Dr. Who" cinema films: Dr. Who and the Daleks, released in 1965 and Daleks - Invasion Earth 2150 AD in 1966. Both are essentially retellings of existing TV stories (specifically, the first two Dalek serials) on the big screen, with a larger budget and alterations to the series concept. Dr. Who is a character in two films made by AARU Productions in the 1960s based on the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Dr. Who and the Daleks (1965) was the first of two Doctor Who films made in the 1960s, and was followed by Daleks - Invasion Earth 2150 AD. The film features Peter Cushing as Dr. Who, Roberta Tovey as Susan, Jennie Linden as Barbara, and noted Carry On star Roy Castle... Daleks - Invasion Earth 2150 AD (1966) is the second of two films based upon the television series Doctor Who. ...


In these films, Peter Cushing plays a human scientist named "Dr. Who", who travels with his two granddaughters and other companions in a time machine he has invented. The Cushing version of the character reappears in both comic strip and literary form, the latter attempting to reconcile the film continuity with that of the series. Dr. Who is a character in two films made by AARU Productions in the 1960s based on the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Peter Wilton Cushing, OBE, (26 May 1913 - 11 August 1994) was an English actor, known for his many appearances in Hammer Films, in which he played Baron Frankenstein and Dr. Van Helsing, amongst many other roles, often appearing opposite his close friend Christopher Lee. ... Dr. Who is a character in two films made by AARU Productions in the 1960s based on the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ...


In addition, a number of planned films were proposed including a sequel, The Chase loosely based on the original series story (the third to feature the same antagonists), for the Cushing Doctor, plus many attempted TVM and big screen productions to revive the original Doctor Who, after the original series was cancelled. (See List of unmade Doctor Who serials and films#Proposed films) The Chase is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in six weekly parts from May 22 to June 26, 1965. ... During the long run of the British science fiction television programme Doctor Who, a number of stories were proposed but, for a variety of reasons, never fully produced. ...


Spin-offs

Main article: Doctor Who spin-offs

Doctor Who has appeared on stage numerous times. In the early 1970s, Trevor Martin played the role in Doctor Who and the Daleks in the Seven Keys to Doomsday which also featured former companion actress Wendy Padbury (Pertwee's Doctor made a cameo appearance via film). In the early 1990s, Jon Pertwee and Colin Baker both played the Doctor at different times during the run of a musical play titled Doctor Who - The Ultimate Adventure. For two performances while Pertwee was ill, David Banks (best known for playing various Cybermen) played the Doctor. Other original plays have been staged as amateur productions, with other actors playing the Doctor, while Terry Nation wrote The Curse of the Daleks, a stage play mounted in the late 1960s, but without the Doctor. Doctor Who spin-offs refers to material created outside of, but related to, the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Trevor Martin Trevor Martin is a British actor. ... Doctor Who and the Daleks in the Seven Keys to Doomsday was a stage play which ran at the Adelphi Theatre in London, England for four weeks, beginning on 16 December 1974, based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Wendy Padbury in 1993. ... Advertisement for the play during the time Jon Pertwee starred as the Doctor. ... David Banks David Banks (born 24 September 1951 in Hull, England) is a British actor. ... The Cybermen are a fictional race of cyborgs who are amongst the most persistent enemies of the Doctor in the British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. ... Terry Nation (August 8, 1930 – March 9, 1997) was a British television screenwriter and is probably best known for creating the villainous Daleks for the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Written by David Whitaker and Terry Nation, The Curse Of The Daleks is a Doctor Who stage play which appeared in the mid 1960s at the height of Dalekmania. ...


A pilot episode for a potential spin-off series, K-9 and Company, was aired in 1981 with Elisabeth Sladen reprising her role as companion Sarah Jane Smith and John Leeson as the voice of K-9, but was not picked up as a regular series. Sarah Jane Smith (Elisabeth Sladen) and K-9. ... Elisabeth Sladen (born February 1, 1948, Liverpool, England) is an English actress best known for her work as the character Sarah Jane Smith on the television series Doctor Who and related spin-offs. ... Sarah Jane Smith is a fictional character played by Elisabeth Sladen in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and its related spin-offs. ... John Leeson (born March 1943 in Leicester, Leicestershire, England) is a British actor who although having had a varied stage and television career spanning forty years including both work in repertory and West End productions including Plaza Suite (1969); Flint (1970) and Dont Start Without Me (1971) and character... For the television series, see K-9 (TV series). ...


Concept art for an animated Doctor Who series was produced by animation company Nelvana in the 1980s, but the series was not produced.[63] This article is about the entertainment company. ...


The Doctor has also appeared in webcasts and in audio plays; prominent among the latter were those produced by Big Finish Productions from 1999 onwards, who were responsible for a range of audio plays released on CD, as well as 2006's eight-part BBC 7 series starring Paul McGann. Big Finish Productions is a British company that produces audio plays released straight to compact disc, based on British cult science fiction properties. ... This is a list of audio plays based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who produced by Big Finish Productions. ... BBC Radio 7 is a digital radio station broadcasting comedy, drama, and childrens programming 24 hours a day. ... Paul McGann (born November 14, 1959 in Surrey, England, United Kingdom) is an English actor who made his name on the BBC serial The Monocled Mutineer, in which he played the lead role. ...


Following the success of the 2005 series produced by Russell T. Davies, the BBC commissioned Davies to produce a 13-part spin-off series titled Torchwood (an anagram of "Doctor Who"), set in modern-day Wales and investigating alien activities and crime. The series debuted on BBC Three on 22 October 2006.[64] John Barrowman reprised his role of Jack Harkness from the 2005 series of Doctor Who. It was shot in Summer and Autumn 2006.[65] Two other actresses who appeared in Doctor Who also star in the series; Eve Myles as Gwen, who also played the similarly-named servant girl Gwyneth in the 2005 Doctor Who episode "The Unquiet Dead",[66] and Naoko Mori who reprised her role as Toshiko Sato first seen in "Aliens of London". For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ... For the game, see Anagrams. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 3. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Barrowman (born 11 March 1967 in Mount Vernon, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish actor, musical performer, dancer, singer, and TV presenter who has lived and worked both in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... For other persons and meanings, see Jack Harkness (disambiguation). ... Eve Myles (born 1978) is an actress from Ystradgynlais, Wales. ... The Unquiet Dead is an episode in the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on April 9, 2005. ... Naoko Mori )[1] (born 1975)[2] is a Japanese actress well-known for roles as Sarah, Saffrons friend in Absolutely Fabulous, Mie Nishi-Kawa in Casualty (1993-1994), and Toshiko Sato in Doctor Who and Torchwood. ... Dr Toshiko Tosh Sato , IPA: )[1][2] is a fictional character from the television series Doctor Who and Torchwood, played by Naoko Mori. ... Aliens of London is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on April 16, 2005. ...


A second series of Torchwood began in January 2008 with John Barrowman reprising his role as Captain Jack Harkness and Freema Agyeman reprising her Doctor Who role of Martha Jones for three episodes. For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ... John Barrowman (born 11 March 1967 in Mount Vernon, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish actor, musical performer, dancer, singer, and TV presenter who has lived and worked both in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Freema Agyeman (born 1 January 1979 in Finsbury Park, London[2] ) is an English actress of Ghanaian and Iranian descent whose first notable appearance was in the ITV soap opera Crossroads in 2001[1]. She is best known for playing medical student Martha Jones, companion of the Tenth Doctor in... Martha Jones is a fictional character played by Freema Agyeman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, and will appear in its spin-off series, Torchwood. ...


A new K-9 children's series, K-9, is in development, but not by the BBC.[67] For the Doctor Who character, see K-9 (Doctor Who). ...


The Sarah Jane Adventures, starring Elisabeth Sladen as Sarah Jane Smith, has been developed by CBBC; a special aired on New Year's Day 2007 and a full series began on Monday, 24 September 2007.[68] The Sarah Jane Adventures is a British television series, produced by BBC Wales for CBBC, starring Elisabeth Sladen and created by Russell T. Davies. ... Current CBBC Logo CBBC - short for Childrens BBC - is the brand-name for the BBCs childrens television programmes aimed at children aged between 6 and 12 years old. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


An animated serial, The Infinite Quest, aired alongside the 2007 series of Doctor Who as part of the children's television series Totally Doctor Who.[69] The Infinite Quest is an animated serial based on the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Totally Doctor Who is a childrens television series produced by the BBC to accompany the science fiction series Doctor Who. ...


Charity episodes

In 1993, coinciding with the series' 30th anniversary, a charity special entitled "Dimensions in Time" was produced in aid of Children in Need, featuring all of the surviving actors who played the Doctor and a number of previous companions. Not taken seriously by many, the story had the Rani opening a hole in time, cycling the Doctor and his companions through his previous incarnations and menacing them with monsters from the show's past. It also featured a crossover with the soap opera EastEnders, the action taking place in the latter's Albert Square location and around Greenwich, including the Cutty Sark. The special was one of several special 3D programmes the BBC produced at the time, using a 3D system that made use of the Pulfrich effect requiring glasses with one darkened lens; the picture would look perfectly normal to those viewers who watched without the glasses. Dimensions in Time was a charity special crossover between the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and the soap opera EastEnders that ran in two parts on November 26 and 27, 1993. ... New BBC Children in Need Pudsey and logo from 2007 BBC Children in Need is an annual British charity appeal organised by the BBC. Since 1980 it has raised £470million. ... The Rani is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ... Albert Square is the fictional location of the British soap opera Eastenders. ... This article is about Greenwich in England. ... Cutty sark is 18th century Scots for short chemise or short undergarment[1]. Hyphenated, Cutty-sark was a nickname for a fictional character created by Robert Burns, and from there it became part of an idiom - Weel done, Cutty-sark! (Well done, Cutty-sark!) in colloquial English, especially Scottish English. ... The Pulfrich effect is a consequence of the fact that at low light levels the eye-brain visual response is slower. ...

In 1999, another special, "Doctor Who and the Curse of Fatal Death", was made for Comic Relief and later released on VHS. An affectionate parody of the television series, it was split into four segments, mimicking the traditional serial format, complete with cliffhangers, and running down the same corridor several times when being chased. (The version released on video was split into only two episodes.) In the story, the Doctor (Rowan Atkinson) encounters both the Master (Jonathan Pryce) and the Daleks. During the special the Doctor is forced to regenerate several times, with his subsequent incarnations played by, in order, Richard E. Grant, Jim Broadbent, Hugh Grant, and Joanna Lumley. The script was written by Steven Moffat, later to be head writer and executive producer to the revived series.[16] Rowan Atkinson as the Doctor and Julia Sawalha as Emma in the Doctor Who charity spoof The Curse of Fatal Death. ... Rowan Atkinson as the Doctor and Julia Sawalha as Emma in the Doctor Who charity spoof The Curse of Fatal Death. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Julia Sawalha (born 9th September 1968) is a British actress best known for her roles of Lynda Day (editor of The Junior Gazette in Press Gang), Saffron Monsoon in Absolutely Fabulous and Lydia Bennet in the 1995 miniseries of Pride and Prejudice. ... A parody (pronounced ), in contemporary usage, is a work created to mock, comment on, or poke fun at an original work, its subject, or author, by means of humorous or satiric imitation. ... Rowan Atkinson as the Doctor and Julia Sawalha as Emma. ... Rowan Atkinson as the Doctor and Julia Sawalha as Emma. ... Comic relief is the inclusion of a humorous character or scene or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension. ... This article is about the video format. ... A parody (pronounced ), in contemporary usage, is a work created to mock, comment on, or poke fun at an original work, its subject, or author, by means of humorous or satiric imitation. ... For other uses, see Cliffhanger (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... This article is about the character. ... Jonathan Pryce (born John Price; June 1, 1947) is a Welsh stage and film actor. ... This article is about the fictional species. ... Richard E. Grant depicted as the unofficial Ninth Doctor. ... James Broadbent (born May 24, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning English theatre, film and television actor. ... Hugh John Mungo Grant (born September 9, 1960) is a Golden Globe-winning British actor and film producer. ... Joanna Lamond Lumley, OBE (born 1 May 1946) is an English actress and former model who is best known for her roles in The New Avengers, Absolutely Fabulous, Sapphire and Steel and Sensitive Skin. ... Steven Moffat (born 1961 in Paisley, Scotland) is a British comedy/drama writer who has contributed to television series since the late 1980s. ...


Spoofs and cultural references

Main article: Doctor Who spoofs

Doctor Who has been satirised and spoofed on many occasions by comedians including Spike Milligan and Lenny Henry. Doctor Who fandom has also been lampooned on programmes such as Saturday Night Live, The Chaser's War on Everything, Mystery Science Theater 3000, Family Guy, and The Simpsons. The long running science fiction television series Doctor Who has over the years been the subject of many comedy sketches and especially made comedy programmes, from Spike Milligans Pakistani Dalek to the Comic Relief episode Doctor Who and the Curse of Fatal Death. ... Terence Alan Patrick Seán Milligan KBE (16 April 1918–27 February 2002), known as Spike Milligan, was an Irish comedian, writer, musician, poet and playwright. ... Lenworth George Henry CBE, (born 29 August 1958), is a British writer, comedian and actor. ... The long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who has developed a large fan base over the years. ... SNL redirects here. ... The Chasers War on Everything is a satirical television comedy series broadcast on ABC TV in Australia. ... Mystery Science Theater 3000 (often abbreviated MST3K, sometimes MST 3000 or MST 3K or just MST) is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...

The Doctor in his fourth incarnation has been represented on several episodes of The Simpsons, starting with the episode "Sideshow Bob's Last Gleaming". Jon Culshaw frequently impersonates the Fourth Doctor in the BBC Dead Ringers series. Culshaw's "Doctor" has telephoned four of the "real" Doctors — Tom Baker, Peter Davison, Colin Baker and Sylvester McCoy — in character as the Fourth Doctor. In the 2005 Dead Ringers Christmas special, broadcast shortly before "The Christmas Invasion", Culshaw impersonated both the Fourth and Tenth Doctors, while the Second, Seventh and Ninth Doctors were impersonated by Mark Perry, Kevin Connelly and Phil Cornwell, respectively. Image File history File links Simpsons_Doctor_Who. ... Image File history File links Simpsons_Doctor_Who. ... The Fourth Doctor is the name given to the fourth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Sideshow Bobs Last Gleaming is the ninth episode of The Simpsons seventh season. ... Jonathan Peter Culshaw (born 2 June 1968 in Ormskirk, Lancashire) is a British impressionist and comedian. ... Dead Ringers is a UK radio and television comedy impressions show broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and BBC Two. ... The Christmas Invasion is a 60-minute special episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Mark Perry is an British impressionist and his notable impressions include; David Dickinson, John Prescott and the late Robin Cook. ... Kevin Connelly was born in Middlesbrough, England. ... Phil Cornwell (born 5 October 1957 in Southend-on-Sea) is a British comedian, actor, impressionist and writer. ...


Less a spoof and more of a pastiche is the character of Professor Justin Alphonse Gamble, a renegade from the Time Variance Authority, who appeared in Marvel Comics' Power Man and Iron Fist #79 and Avengers Annual #22. His enemies include the rogue robots known as the Dredlox.[70] The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Power Man and Iron Fist was a Marvel comic book featuring the superheroes Power Man and Iron Fist. ... The Avengers is a team of fictional superhero characters in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ...


There have also been many references to Doctor Who in popular culture and other science fiction franchises, including Star Trek: The Next Generation ("The Neutral Zone", among others) and The Invisible Man (in the pilot episode, a torn business card for I.M. Foreman: Scrap Metal & Salvage is used for identification). In the Channel 4 series Queer As Folk (created by current Doctor Who executive producer Russell T. Davies), the character of Vince was portrayed as an avid Doctor Who fan, with references appearing many times throughout in the form of clips from the programme. References to Doctor Who have also appeared in the young adult fantasy novel High Wizardry,[71] the video game Rock Band,[72] the soap opera EastEnders, the Adult Swim comedy show "Robot Chicken" and the Family Guy Star Wars spoof episode "Blue Harvest", among other sources. The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... The Invisible Man series debuted in 2000 and starred Vincent Ventresca, Paul Ben-Victor, Eddie Jones, Shannon Kenny and Mike McCafferty. ... This article is about the character of the Doctor. ... Queer as Folk is a 1999 British television series that chronicles the lives of three gay men let loose in Manchesters gay village around Canal Street. ... High Wizardry is the third book in the Young Wizards series by Diane Duane. ... Rock Band redirects here. ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ... Adult Swim, usually stylized [adult swim], is an adult-oriented television network sharing channel space with Cartoon Network in the United States. ... Robot Chicken is an Emmy Award-winning American stop motion animated television series created by Seth Green and Matthew Senreich, who are the executive producers. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... This article is about the series. ... Blue Harvest is the hour-long premier to the sixth season of the FOX series Family Guy, and which originally aired on September 23, 2007. ...


The Doctor also makes an appearance in the June 10, 2008 edition of This Modern World by Tom Tomorrow as a visitor from the future who informs Sparky in 2003 that the Democratic Party (USA) has nominated an African-American (Barack Obama), much to his disbelief.[73] This Modern World is a weekly satirical comic strip by cartoonist and political commentator Tom Tomorrow (aka Dan Perkins) that covers current events from a liberal point of view. ... Dan Perkins (born 1961 in Wichita, Kansas), better known by the pen name Tom Tomorrow, is an editorial cartoonist. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


Merchandise

Since its beginnings, Doctor Who has generated many hundreds of products related to the show, from toys and games to collectible picture cards and postage stamps. These include board games, card games, gamebooks, computer games, roleplaying games and action figures. The long running British science fiction television series Doctor Who has since its beginnings in the 1960s generated many hundreds of products related to the show, from toys and games to picture cards and postage stamps. ... A teddy bear A toy is an object used in play. ... For other uses, see Game (disambiguation). ... Trade card describes small cards, similar to the visiting cards exchanged in social circles, that businesses would distribute to clients and potential customers. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... A shelf of board games. ... For the game on The Price Is Right, see Card Game (pricing game). ... A gamebook is a book with a branching plot that serves as a medium for gameplay. ... -1... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Zarbon action figure made by Bandai, from the Dragon Ball franchise An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, comic book, video game, or television program. ...


Many games have been released that feature the Daleks. See Dalek computer games. This article is about the fictional species. ... This article is about the fictional species. ...


Books

Doctor Who books have been published from the mid-sixties through to the present day. Since the relaunch of the programme in 2005, a new range of novels have been published by BBC Books, featuring the adventures of the Ninth and Tenth Doctors. BBC Books is the book publishing division of BBC Worldwide, the commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ...

The Past Doctor Adventures (sometimes known by the abbreviation PDA or PDAs) are a series of spin-off novels based on the long running BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who and published under the BBC Books imprint. ... The Eight Doctors was the first novel in the Eighth Doctor Adventures range. ... The Clockwise Man was the first volume in the New Series Adventures range. ...

Awards

Although Doctor Who was fondly regarded during its original 1963–1989 run, it received little critical recognition at the time. In 1975, Season 11 of the series won a Writers' Guild of Great Britain award for Best Writing in a Children's Serial. In 1996, BBC television held the "Auntie Awards" as the culmination of their "TV60" season, celebrating sixty years of BBC television broadcasting, where Doctor Who was voted as the "Best Popular Drama" the corporation had ever produced, ahead of such ratings heavyweights as EastEnders and Casualty.[74] In 2000, Doctor Who was ranked third in a list of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes of the twentieth century, produced by the British Film Institute and voted on by industry professionals.[75] In 2005, the series came first in a survey by SFX magazine of "The Greatest UK Science Fiction and Fantasy Television Series Ever". Also, in the 100 Greatest Kids' TV shows (a Channel 4 countdown in 2001), the 1963–1989 run was placed at number eight. Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ... Casualty is the longest running emergency medical drama series in the world[1], first broadcast in 1986 and transmitted in the UK on BBC One (with repeats on UKTV Gold). ... 100 Greatest British Television Programmes was a list compiled in 2000 by the British Film Institute (BFI) chosen by a poll of industry professionals, to determine what were the greatest British television programmes of any genre ever to have been screened. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... SFX is a British science fiction magazine, published every four weeks. ... The 100 Greatest Kids TV Shows was a poll conducted by the British television channel Channel 4 in 2001. ... This article is about the British television station. ...


The revived series has received particular recognition from critics and the public. In 2005, at the National Television Awards (voted on by members of the British public), Doctor Who won "Most Popular Drama", Christopher Eccleston won "Most Popular Actor" and Billie Piper won "Most Popular Actress". The series and Piper repeated their wins at the 2006 National Television Awards, and David Tennant won "Most Popular Actor" in 2006 and 2007, with the series again taking the Most Popular Drama award in 2007.[76][77] A scene from "The Doctor Dances" won "Golden Moment" in the BBC's "2005 TV Moments" awards,[78] and Doctor Who swept all the categories in BBC.co.uk's online "Best of Drama" poll in both 2005[79] and 2006.[80] The programme also won the Broadcast Magazine Award for Best Drama.[81] Eccleston was awarded the TV Quick and TV Choice award for Best Actor in 2005; in the same awards in 2006 Tennant won Best Actor, Piper won Best Actress and Doctor Who won Best-Loved Drama.[82][83] The National Television Awards is a British television awards ceremony, sponsored by the ITV network and initiated in 1995. ... The Doctor Dances is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on May 28, 2005. ... The domain name bbc. ...


Doctor Who was nominated in the Best Drama Series category at the 2006 Royal Television Society awards,[84] but lost to BBC Three's medical drama Bodies.[85] The Royal Television Society is a British-based society for the discussion, analysis and preservation of television in all its forms, past, present and future. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 3. ... Bodies is a 2004 medical drama from BBC3 based on the book Bodies by Jed Mercurio. ...


Doctor Who also received several nominations for the 2006 Broadcasting Press Guild Awards: the programme for Best Drama, Eccleston for Best Actor (David Tennant was also nominated for Secret Smile), Piper for Best Actress and Davies for Best Writer. However, it did not win any of these categories.[86] The Broadcasting Press Guild is a British association of journalists who specialise in writing and broadcasting about television, radio and the media generally. ... Secret Smile was a drama serial in two parts shown by ITV in December 2005, based on the Nicci French book of the same name and starring David Tennant, Claire Goose and Kate Ashfield. ...


Several episodes of the 2005 series of Doctor Who were nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form: "Dalek", "Father's Day" and the double episode "The Empty Child"/"The Doctor Dances". At a ceremony at the Worldcon (L.A. Con IV) in Los Angeles on 27 August 2006, the Hugo was awarded to "The Empty Child"/"The Doctor Dances".[87] "Dalek" and "Father's Day" came in second and third places respectively.[88] The 2006 series episodes "School Reunion", "Army of Ghosts"/"Doomsday", and "The Girl in the Fireplace" were nominated for the same category of the 2007 Hugo Awards, with "The Girl in the Fireplace" winning.[89] The 2007 series episodes "Blink" and "Human Nature"/"The Family of Blood" also secured nominations in this category in the 2008 Hugo Awards.[90] The Hugo Awards are given annually by members of the World Science Fiction Convention for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... Dalek is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on April 30, 2005. ... Fathers Day is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on May 14, 2005. ... The Empty Child is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on May 21, 2005. ... The Doctor Dances is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on May 28, 2005. ... The logo of L.A.con IV The 64th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) will be L.A.con IV, which will be held in Los Angeles, United States 23-27 August, 2006. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The British Academy Television Awards (BAFTA) nominations, released on 27 March 2006, revealed that Doctor Who had been short-listed in the category of Best Drama Series. This is the highest-profile and most prestigious British television award for which the series has ever been nominated. Doctor Who was also nominated in several other categories in the BAFTA Craft Awards, including Best Writer (Russell T Davies), Best Director (Joe Ahearne), and Break-through Talent (production designer Edward Thomas). However, it did not eventually win any of its categories at the Craft Awards. The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Russell T Davies, OBE (born Steven Russell Davies,[1] 27 April 1963), is a Welsh television producer and writer. ... Joe Ahearne appearing on Doctor Who Confidential Joe Ahearne (born 23 November 1963) is a British television director, best known for his work on several fantasy-based cult programmes. ...


On 7 May 2006 the main BAFTA award winners were announced, and Doctor Who won both of the categories it was nominated for, the Best Drama Series and audience-voted Pioneer Award. Russell T. Davies also won the Dennis Potter Award for Outstanding Writing for Television.[91] Writer Steven Moffat won the Best Writer category at the 2008 BAFTA Craft Awards for his 2007 Doctor Who episode "Blink".[92] is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Academy Television Award for Best Drama Series is one of the major categories of the British Academy Television Awards (BAFTAs), the primary awards ceremony of the British television industry. ... Liber Amoris Dennis Christopher George Potter (17 May 1935—7 June 1994) was a controversial British dramatist who is best known for several widely acclaimed television dramas which mixed fantasy and reality, the personal and the social. ... Steven Moffat (born 1961 in Paisley, Scotland) is a British comedy/drama writer who has contributed to television series since the late 1980s. ... Blink is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...


On 22 April 2006, the programme won five categories (out of fourteen nominations) at the lower-profile BAFTA Cymru awards, given to programmes made in Wales. It won Best Drama Series, Drama Director (James Hawes), Costume, Make-up and Photography Direction. Russell T. Davies also won the Siân Phillips Award for Outstanding Contribution to Network Television.[93] The programme enjoyed further success at the BAFTA Cymru awards the following year, winning eight of the thirteen categories in which it was nominated, including Best Actor for David Tennant and Best Drama Director for Graeme Harper.[94] is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BAFTA Cymru (or BAFTA Wales) is the regional organisation for Wales of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. ... James Hawes is a British television director, who has worked on a variety of the most popular series on British television since the early 1990s. ... Siân Phillips (pronounced IPA: ), CBE is a Welsh actress who was born Jane Elizabeth Ailwên Phillips in Betws, Carmarthenshire, Wales, on May 14, 1933. ... David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... Graeme Harper is a British television director. ...


On 7 July 2007, the series won three Constellation Awards: David Tennant won "Best Male Performance in a 2006 Science Fiction Television Episode" for the episode "The Girl in the Fireplace", and the series itself won "Best Science Fiction Television Series of 2006" and "Outstanding Canadian Contribution to Science Fiction Film or Television in 2006". It was eligible for the latter award due to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's involvement as co-producer of the series. is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Constellation Awards logo The Constellation Awards are a set of Canadian awards that are awarded annually for the best science fiction or fantasy television or film works of the previous year. ... David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... The Girl in the Fireplace is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Radio-Canada redirects here. ...


On 8 November 2007, the series received its first mainstream American award nomination when it was nominated for the 34th Annual People's Choice Awards in the category of "Favorite Sci-Fi Show". The awards, broadcast on CBS on 8 January 2008 are voted on by the people via an Internet poll. Doctor Who faced competition from American-produced series Battlestar Galactica (itself a revival of an older series), and Stargate Atlantis.[95] It was defeated by Stargate Atlantis.[96] In June 2008, the series won the inauguaral Best International Series category at the 34th Saturn Awards, defeating its spin-off, Torchwood, which was also nominated.[97] is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Peoples Choice Awards, held annually in January, is one of the few awards shows to be based on popularity. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the 2004 television series. ... Stargate Atlantis (often abbreviated as SGA) is an American-Canadian science fiction television program, part of the Stargate franchise owned by MGM. Developed by longtime SG-1 producers Brad Wright and Robert C. Cooper, it is a spin-off from the television series Stargate SG-1. ...


See also

BBC portal
Doctor Who portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... Doctor Who Chronology redirects here. ... The Stranger was a series of direct-to-video science fiction dramas made by BBV and starring Colin Baker. ... Doctor Who in Australia refers to the Australian history and culture around the British science fiction programme Doctor Who. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ "Dr Who 'longest-running sci-fi'", BBC News (2006-09-28). Retrieved on 2006-09-30. 
  2. ^ "The end of Olde Englande: A lament for Blighty" (2006-09-14). The Economist. Retrieved on 2006-09-18. 
  3. ^ a b "ICONS. A Portrait of England". Retrieved on 2007-11-10.
  4. ^ a b Moran, Caitlin (2007-06-30). "Doctor Who is simply masterful", The Times, News Corporation. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. "[Doctor Who] is as thrilling and as loved as Jolene, or bread and cheese, or honeysuckle, or Friday. It’s quintessential to being British." 
  5. ^ "Series Four confirmed". Doctor Who - News. BBC (22 March 2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  6. ^ a b "Tate to be Doctor's new companion". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-04.
  7. ^ Spilsbury, Tom (2008-07-23 cover date). "Gallifrey Guardian". Doctor Who Magazine (397): 10. 
  8. ^ Howe, Stammers, Walker (1994), p. 54
  9. ^ Howe, Stammers, Walker (1994), pp. 157–230 ("Production Diary")
  10. ^ Newman is often given sole creator credit for the series. Some reference works such as The Complete Encyclopedia of Television Programs 1947–1979 by Vincent Terrace erroneously credit Terry Nation with creating Doctor Who, due to the way his name is credited in the two Peter Cushing films.
  11. ^ Newman and Lambert's role in originating the series was recognised in the 2007 episode "Human Nature", in which the Doctor, in disguise as a human named John Smith, gives his parents' names as Sydney and Verity.
  12. ^ Richards, p. 23
  13. ^ Howe, Stammers, Walker (1992), p. 3
  14. ^ Deans, Jason (2005-06-21). "Doctor Who makes the Grade". Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved on 2007-02-04. “But Mr Grade was not at the helm when Doctor Who was finally retired for good in 1989 - that decision fell to the then BBC1 controller, Jonathan Powell.”
  15. ^ a b "Series Five", Doctor Who: News, BBC (2007-09-03). Retrieved on 2007-09-03. , note that Tennant is confirmed for the 2009 specials.
  16. ^ a b "Doctor Who guru Davies steps down". BBC News (2008-05-20). Retrieved on 2008-05-20.
  17. ^ Outpost Gallifrey: TV Series FAQ
  18. ^ Clark, Anthony. "Doctor Who (1963–89, 2005–)". Screenonline. Retrieved on 2007-03-21. “The science fiction adventure series Doctor Who (BBC, 1963–89) has created a phenomenon unlike any other British TV program.”
  19. ^ Tulloch, John. "Doctor Who". Museum of Broadcast Communications. Retrieved on 2007-03-21. “The official fans have never amounted to more than a fraction of the audience. Doctor Who achieved the status of an institution as well as a cult.”
  20. ^ "Biography of Mary Whitehouse". Retrieved on 2007-07-06.
  21. ^ "Doctor Who Producer Dies". Retrieved on 2007-07-06.
  22. ^ a b Howard, Philip (1972-01-29). "Violence is not really Dr Who's cup of tea", The Times, pp. 2. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  23. ^ "The Times Diary - Points of view", The Times (1972-01-27), pp. 16. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  24. ^ "Case details for Trade Mark 2104259". UK Patent Office. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  25. ^ "Trade mark decision". UK Patent Office website. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  26. ^ Knight, Mike. "IN THE MATTER OF Application No. 2104259 by The British Broadcasting Corporation to register a series of three marks in Classes 9, 16, 25 and 41 AND IN THE MATTER OF Opposition thereto under No. 48452 by The Metropolitan Police Authority" (PDF). UK Patent Office. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  27. ^ "BBC wins police Tardis case". BBC News (2002-10-23). Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  28. ^ Leith, Sam (2008-07-04). "Worshipping Doctor Who from behind the sofa", Daily Telegraph. Retrieved on 2008-07-07. 
  29. ^ Robinson, James (2007-03-18). "Television's Lord of prime time awaits his next regeneration", The Observer. Retrieved on 2007-03-19. 
  30. ^ The Daleks' Master Plan. Writers Terry Nation and Dennis Spooner, Director Douglas Camfield, Producer John Wiles. Doctor Who. BBC. BBC One, London. 13 November 196529 January 1966.
  31. ^ "Mission to the Unknown". Writer Terry Nation, Director Derek Martinus, Producer Verity Lambert. Doctor Who. BBC. BBC One, London. 1965-10-09.
  32. ^ The War Games. Writers Malcolm Hulke and Terrance Dicks, Director David Maloney, Producer Derrick Sherwin. Doctor Who. BBC. BBC One, London. 19 April 196921 June 1969.
  33. ^ The Trial of a Time Lord. Writers Robert Holmes, Philip Martin and Pip and Jane Baker, Directors Nicholas Mallett, Ron Jones and Chris Clough, Producer John Nathan-Turner. Doctor Who. BBC. BBC One, London. 6 September 19866 December 1986.
  34. ^ Black Orchid. Writer Terence Dudley, Director Ron Jones, Producer John Nathan-Turner. Doctor Who. BBC. BBC One, London. 1 March 19822 March 1982.
  35. ^ The tapes, based on a 405-line broadcast standard, were rendered obsolete when UK television changed to a 625-line signal in preparation for the soon-to-begin colour transmissions.
  36. ^ Molesworth, Richard. "BBC Archive Holdings". Doctor Who Restoration Team. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. “A full set was held at least until early 1972, as 16 mm black and white film negatives (apart - of course - from 'Masterplan' 7). .”
  37. ^ Molesworth, Richard. "BBC Archive Holdings". Doctor Who Restoration Team. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. “the videotapes began to be wiped, or re-used, until the formation of the BBC’s Film and Videotape Library in 1978 put a stop to this particular practice.”
  38. ^ Flash Frames, a featurette included on the DVD release of The Invasion, BBC Video, 2006.
  39. ^ "Blue Peter — Missing Doctor Who tapes". bbc.co.uk (April 2006). Retrieved on 2006-04-24.
  40. ^ Now an entry in the Oxford English Dictionary the word "TARDIS" is often used to describe anything that appears larger on the inside than its exterior implies. "Full record for Tardis-like adj.". Science Fiction Citations. Retrieved on 2007-09-07.
  41. ^ "BBC official episode guide". BBC (2008-03-31). Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  42. ^ BBC - Doctor Who - Classic Series - Episode Guide - Seventh Doctor Index
  43. ^ "TV Movie cast & crew". BBC. Retrieved on 2008-04-15.
  44. ^ "Doctor Who: the TV movie". BBC. Retrieved on 2008-06-13.
  45. ^ BBC - Doctor Who - FAQ - Plot and Continuity
  46. ^ "More Martha!". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-02.
  47. ^ "Doctor Who to get extra companion". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-02.
  48. ^ "Billie Piper to return to Dr Who". bbc.c.uk. Retrieved on 2007-11-27.
  49. ^ ""Doctor Who Confidential: The Saxon Mystery"". BBC News (2007-06-23). Retrieved on 2007-07-09.
  50. ^ "NATION, TERRY". Retrieved on 2008-05-19.
  51. ^ Doctor Who Magazine Special Edition #2, 5 September 2002, [subtitled The Complete Third Doctor], page 14)
  52. ^ a b c Peel, Ian (2008-07-07). "Doctor Who: a musical force?". The Guardian. blog. Retrieved on 2008-07-07.
  53. ^ "Who soundtrack soon". bbc.co.uk (2006-07-17). Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  54. ^ "Silva Screen announces Doctor Who CD release date" (2006-11-01). Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  55. ^ Spilsbury, Tom (2006-09-13 cover date). "Public Image". Doctor Who Magazine (373): 8. 
  56. ^ Mark Wright (2007-11-01). "“These sci-fi people vote”", The Stage. Retrieved on 2008-01-09. 
  57. ^ "Turning Japanese" (30 June 2006). Although Fuu is an accurate romanisation of the Japanese name, the Japanese version of the programme also employs the English name alongside the Japanese equivalent. Additionally, many speakers will pronounce Fuu as Huu. See also NHK's Doctor Who website.
  58. ^ Clements, Jonathan (March), “Anime Pulse: Soundalikes”, NEO (no. 30): 20 
  59. ^ "Canada: Runaway Bride and Series Three on CBC". CBC.ca. Retrieved on 2007-06-09.
  60. ^ "Sci Fi On Air Schedule". Scifi.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-09.
  61. ^ "'Doctor Who' Season Four, 'Sarah Jane' Travel to Sci Fi". Zap2it. Retrieved on 2008-02-04.
  62. ^ "Series Four Starts September 19 on CBC". www.dwin.org. Retrieved on 2008-05-22.
  63. ^ "Planet of the Doctor". Retrieved on 2007-02-20.
  64. ^ Torchwood programme information, BBC Three listings. Retrieved on 15 October 2006.
  65. ^ "Doctor Who spin-off made in Wales", BBC News (2005-10-17). Retrieved on 2006-04-24. 
  66. ^ "Team Torchwood". bbc.co.uk (2006-02-24). Retrieved on 2006-04-24.
  67. ^ "Doctor Who dog K9 gets spin-off". BBC News (2006-04-26). Retrieved on 2006-07-26.
  68. ^ BBC (2006-09-14). "Russell T Davies creates new series for CBBC, starring Doctor Who's Sarah Jane Smith". Press release. Retrieved on 2006-09-14.
  69. ^ "Who's a Toon?", BBC Doctor Who website (2007-01-26). Retrieved on 2007-01-26. 
  70. ^ "Professor Justin Alphone Gamble". The Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe (2004-09-26). Retrieved on 2006-06-22.
  71. ^ "Man In The Bar, the". The Errantry Concordance. Diane Duane (2005-03-25). Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  72. ^ "Doctor who Love in Rock Band". flickr. zerolives (2007-11-20). Retrieved on 2007-12-24.
  73. ^ "This Modern World". The Week that Was. Tom Tomorrow (2008-06-10). Retrieved on 2008-06-12.
  74. ^ Culf, Andrew (1996-11-04). "Viewers spurn TV's golden age in poll of small screen classics as the BBC fetes its 60th birthday", The Guardian, p. 4. 
  75. ^ "Fawlty Towers tops TV hits". BBC News Online (2000-09-05). Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  76. ^ "Dr Who scores TV awards hat-trick", BBC News, bbc.co.uk (2006-10-31). Retrieved on 2006-10-31. 
  77. ^ "Ant and Dec win three TV awards". BBC News Online (2007-11-01). Retrieved on 2007-11-01.
  78. ^ "2005 TV Moments". bbc.co.uk (December 2005). Retrieved on 2006-04-24.
  79. ^ "Drama Best of 2005". bbc.co.uk (December 2005). Retrieved on 2006-04-24.
  80. ^ "Drama Best of 2006". bbc.co.uk (January 2007). Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  81. ^ "Doctor Who wins Broadcast Award". bbc.co.uk (2006-01-26). Retrieved on 2006-04-24.
  82. ^ "Street is best soap at TV awards", BBC News (2005-09-06). Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  83. ^ "Doctor Who lands three TV awards", BBC News (2006-09-05). Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  84. ^ "RTS Programme Awards - Nominations", The Guardian (2006-02-21). Retrieved on 2006-04-24. 
  85. ^ "Bleak House wins TV drama award", BBC News (2006-03-15). Retrieved on 2006-04-24. 
  86. ^ "Broadcasting Press Guild Awards 2006". Broadcasting Press Guild (31 March 2006). Retrieved on 2006-04-24.
  87. ^ "Hugo and Campbell Awards Winners". Locus Online (2006-08-26). Retrieved on 2006-08-27.
  88. ^ "Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form". 2006 Hugo Award & Campbell Award Winners (2006-08-26). Retrieved on 2006-08-28.
  89. ^ "2007 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society (2007-09-01). Retrieved on 2007-09-01.
  90. ^ "2008 Hugo Nomination List". Denvention 3: The 66th World Science Fiction Convention. World Science Fiction Society (2008). Retrieved on 2008-03-21.
  91. ^ "Doctor Who is Bafta award winner", BBC News (2006-05-08). Retrieved on 2006-05-08. 
  92. ^ "Bafta glory for Channel 4's Boy A". BBC News Online (2008-05-12). Retrieved on 2008-05-13.
  93. ^ "Doctor leads Bafta Cymru winners", BBC News (2006-04-22). Retrieved on 2006-04-24. 
  94. ^ "Dr Who sweeps Bafta Cymru board". BBC News Online (2007-04-29). Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  95. ^ ""Bourne" Earns 3 People's Choice Nods", Associated Press (2007-11-09). Retrieved on 2007-12-15. 
  96. ^ People's Choice Awards website, accessed 8 January 2008
  97. ^ Winners list, accessed June 30, 2008

This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Caitlin Moran (b. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Times. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: , LSE: NCRA) is an American media conglomerate company and the third worlds largest. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Doctor Who Magazine (abbreviated as DWM) is a magazine devoted to the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... For the Doctor Who novel of the same name, see Human Nature (Doctor Who novel). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... screenonline is a website devoted to the history of British film and television, and to social history as revealed by film and television. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Museum of Broadcast Communications is located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Times. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Times. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The UK Intellectual Property Office, or UK-IPO, formerly known as The Patent Office,[1] is the lead United Kingdom government agency responsible for developing and administering policy in most areas of intellectual property, under the overall aegis of the Department of Trade and Industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The UK Intellectual Property Office, or UK-IPO, formerly known as The Patent Office,[1] is the lead United Kingdom government agency responsible for developing and administering policy in most areas of intellectual property, under the overall aegis of the Department of Trade and Industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... The UK Intellectual Property Office, or UK-IPO, formerly known as The Patent Office,[1] is the lead United Kingdom government agency responsible for developing and administering policy in most areas of intellectual property, under the overall aegis of the Department of Trade and Industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daleks Master Plan is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in twelve weekly parts from November 13, 1965 to January 29, 1966. ... Terry Nation (August 8, 1930 – March 9, 1997) was a British television screenwriter and is probably best known for creating the villainous Daleks for the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Dennis Spooner (born 1 December 1932 in Tottenham London; died 20 September 1986) was a British television scriptwriter, known for his ability to write to order if necessary, who created the classic British television series Man in a Suitcase, The Champions and The Adventurer, as well as writing for others... Douglas Camfield was an accomplished director for television in the 1960s to the 1980s. ... John Wiles was the second producer of the popular science fiction serial Doctor Who, succeeding Verity Lambert. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Mission to the Unknown is a single-episode Doctor Who story. ... Terry Nation (August 8, 1930 – March 9, 1997) was a British television screenwriter and is probably best known for creating the villainous Daleks for the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Verity Lambert (born November 27, 1935 in London, England, UK) is a British television and film producer, best known for producing the science-fiction series Doctor Who for the BBC for its first two years, from 1963 to 1965. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Doctor Who serial. ... Malcolm Hulke (died July 6, 1979) was a British television writer, notable for his work on the science fiction series Doctor Who. ... Terrance Dicks (born 1935 in East Ham, London) is an English writer, best known for his work in television and for writing a large number of popular childrens books during the 1970s and 80s. ... David Maloney is a British television director and producer. ... Derrick Sherwin was one of the key figures on the production side of the BBC programme Doctor Who during the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Trial of a Time Lord is the on-screen title for all fourteen episodes comprising the 23rd season (1986) of the original Doctor Who series. ... This entry is about the television scriptwriter. ... Philip Martin (born 1938 in Liverpool) is an English television screenwriter. ... Pip and Jane Baker are British television writers best known for their contributions the long running science fiction series Doctor Who. ... Ron Jones (6 August 1945-1995) was a British television director. ... John Nathan-Turner. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Black Orchid is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in two parts on March 1 and March 2, 1982. ... Terence Dudley was a television director of many years standing who directed many programmes for the BBC. In 1980 he began an association with Doctor Who when he directed Meglos for John Nathan-Turner. ... Ron Jones (6 August 1945-1995) was a British television director. ... John Nathan-Turner. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... -1... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The Doctor Who Restoration Team is a loose collection of Doctor Who fans, many within the television industry, who restore Doctor Who episodes for release on DVD. The Restoration Team was formed in 1992 when a small group of Doctor Who fans approached the BBCs Television Archivist wanting funding... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Doctor Who Restoration Team is a loose collection of Doctor Who fans, many within the television industry, who restore Doctor Who episodes for release on DVD. The Restoration Team was formed in 1992 when a small group of Doctor Who fans approached the BBCs Television Archivist wanting funding... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Invasion is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in eight weekly parts from November 2 to December 21, 1968. ... BBC Video is a video company of the United Kingdom and United States. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Doctor Who Magazine (abbreviated as DWM) is a magazine devoted to the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Stage is a weekly British newspaper founded in 1880, available nationally and published on Thursdays. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Jonathan Clements (born July 9, 1971) is a British author and scriptwriter. ... NEO is a 100-page monthly magazine that is published in the UK and Ireland that reviews and contains articles about different forms of asian entertainment, including anime and manga, live action films originating from Hong Kong, Korea, Japan and other asian countries; and J-pop/J-rock etc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Diane Duane (b. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dan Perkins (born 1961 in Wichita, Kansas), better known by the pen name Tom Tomorrow, is an editorial cartoonist. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Broadcasting Press Guild is a British association of journalists who specialise in writing and broadcasting about television, radio and the media generally. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

David J. Howe is a British novelist, writer, journalist, publisher, and media historian. ... Mark Stammers is a graphic designer, editor and author best known for his work related to the BBC Television series Doctor Who. ... Stephen James Walker is a writer and editor most associated with his work relating to the BBC Television series Doctor Who, usually with co-editors David J. Howe and/or Mark Stammers. ... Virgin Books is the book publishing arm of Virgin Enterprises, the company originally set up by Richard Branson as a record company. ... David J. Howe is a British novelist, writer, journalist, publisher, and media historian. ... Mark Stammers is a graphic designer, editor and author best known for his work related to the BBC Television series Doctor Who. ... Stephen James Walker is a writer and editor most associated with his work relating to the BBC Television series Doctor Who, usually with co-editors David J. Howe and/or Mark Stammers. ... Virgin Books is the book publishing arm of Virgin Enterprises, the company originally set up by Richard Branson as a record company. ... Justin Richards is a British writer. ... BBC Books is the book publishing division of BBC Worldwide, the commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... David J. Howe is a British novelist, writer, journalist, publisher, and media historian. ... Stephen James Walker is a writer and editor most associated with his work relating to the BBC Television series Doctor Who, usually with co-editors David J. Howe and/or Mark Stammers. ... BBC Books is the book publishing division of BBC Worldwide, the commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... Telos Publishing Ltd. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

Official sites

See also: Doctor Who tie-in websites

The 2005 series revival of the long-running British science fiction television programme Doctor Who features several tie-in websites produced by the BBC website team that viewers can access on the Internet. ... The domain name bbc. ... The domain name bbc. ...

Reference sites

General information

Awards
Preceded by
Shameless
British Academy Television Awards
Best Drama Series

2006
Succeeded by
The Street
Wikia (no official pronunciation[2]; originally Wikicities) is a selective wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) operated by Wikia, Inc. ... For other uses, see Shameless (disambiguation). ... The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... The Street is a BBC television series created by Jimmy McGovern which follows the lives of different residents of one street. ... This article is about the character of the Doctor. ... Companion, in the long-running BBC television science fiction programme Doctor Who and related works, is a term used to describe a character who travels with and shares the adventures of the Doctor. ... This article is about the fictional species. ... The Cybermen are a fictional race of cyborgs who are amongst the most persistent enemies of the Doctor in the British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. ... This article is about the character. ... For the Big Finish Audio of the same name, see Davros (Doctor Who audio). ... The Sontarans are a fictional extraterrestrial race from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The current TARDIS prop. ... Regeneration, in the context of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, is a biological ability exhibited by the Time Lords, a race of humanoids originating on the planet Gallifrey. ... Look up unit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Torchwood Institute is a fictional organisation from the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and its spin-off series, Torchwood. ... Combatants Time Lords Dalek Empire Commanders President of Gallifrey Dalek Emperor Casualties Virtually the entire Time Lord population; the Doctor and the Master are known survivors. ... // The Whoniverse, a portmanteau of Doctor Who and universe, is the fictional universe in which Doctor Who, Torchwood and other related stories take place. ... The Doctor Who diamond logo, used in the shows opening titles from 1973 to 1980 Doctor Who is a British television science-fiction series, produced and screened by the British Broadcasting Corporation on their BBC One channel from 1963 to 1989 in its original form, with a new series... In both the original run and since the 2005 revival, long-running British science fiction television programme Doctor Who has featured a number of story arcs. ... Material from missing Doctor Who serials has seen release in books, and in audio form on CD, and two episodes have been animated for DVD release. ... The Doctor Who theme music was created in 1963, composed by Ron Grainer and realised with electronics by Delia Derbyshire of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. ... The long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who has developed a large fan base over the years. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... This is a list of Doctor Who serials that, as far as is known, no longer exist in the form that they were transmitted (that is, serials that are incomplete in the archives). ... During the long run of the British science fiction television programme Doctor Who, a number of stories were proposed but, for a variety of reasons, never fully produced. ... This is a list of titled episodes in the early years of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Every Region 2 Doctor Who Classic Series DVD release. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a series of lists of those who have received a producer credit (executive, associate, etc. ... This is a list of those who have received an official script editing credit on the long-running British science fiction television programme Doctor Who. ... This is a list of those who have received a writer credit on the long-running British science fiction television programme Doctor Who. ... Many celebrities and notable actors have made guest appearances in Doctor Who. ... Over the course of its many years on television, the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who has not only seen changes in the actors to play the Doctor, but in the supporting cast as well. ... This is a list of historical, mythical and fictional characters who have encountered the time traveller known as the Doctor, in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... This is a list of monsters and aliens from the long-running BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The War Chief redirects here. ... This is a list of henchmen, fictional characters serving villains and/or monsters and aliens in the long-running British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. ... The long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who has featured many robots. ... This is a list of planets, fictional or otherwise, that are mentioned in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and its spinoff literature. ... This is a list of items from the BBC television series Doctor Who. ... The science fiction television series Doctor Who has presented various vehicles belonging to multiple races/societies. ... This is a list of songs and incidental music that have/has been featured on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who Chronology redirects here. ... For a list of Doctor Who television serials by year of historical setting, see Chronology of the Doctor Who universe. ... Sarah Jane Smith (Elisabeth Sladen) and K-9. ... TARDISODEs are mini-episodes of the television programme Doctor Who, approximately 60 seconds long. ... For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ... The Sarah Jane Adventures is a British television series, produced by BBC Wales for CBBC, starring Elisabeth Sladen and created by Russell T. Davies. ... For the Doctor Who character, see K-9 (Doctor Who). ... The Doctor Who Confidential logo Doctor Who Confidential is a documentary series created by the British Broadcasting Corporation to complement the revival of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Totally Doctor Who is a childrens television series produced by the BBC to accompany the science fiction series Doctor Who. ... Torchwood Declassified is a documentary series created by the British Broadcasting Corporation to complement the British science fiction television series Torchwood. ... Doctor Who spin-offs refers to material created outside of, but related to, the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Dr. Who is a character in two films made by AARU Productions in the 1960s based on the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... The long running science fiction television series Doctor Who has over the years been the subject of many comedy sketches and especially made comedy programmes, from Spike Milligans Pakistani Dalek to the Comic Relief episode Doctor Who and the Curse of Fatal Death. ... The cover to Kaldor City: Checkmate, designed by Andy Hopkinson Kaldor City is a human city of the future on an unspecified alien world, created by Chris Boucher for the Doctor Who serial The Robots of Death broadcast in 1977, and reused in his Past Doctor Adventure Corpse Marker in... This is a list of fictional characters who were companions of the Doctor, in various spin-off media based on the long-running British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who Magazine (abbreviated as DWM) is a magazine devoted to the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who Adventures is a magazine based on the British science fiction television programme Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who - Battles in Time is both a trading card game and the supplementary fortnightly magazine from the partwork publishers, GE Fabbri who have the license to produce Battles in Time for a two-year period. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Doctor (Doctor Who) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8772 words)
The Doctor is the central fictional character in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who, and also featured in a vast range of spin-off novels, audio dramas and comic strips connected to the series.
The Doctor Who novels have suggested that these may have been faces of the Other, a figure from Gallifrey's ancient past and the genetic predecessor of the Doctor (although being from the tie-in novels, the canonicity of this character is debatable).
As the Doctor had a granddaughter, it was implicit from the beginning that he probably had had, at some point, romantic or at least sexual relations with someone (in Fear Her (2006), he states that he was once a father).
Doctor Who - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6449 words)
Doctor Who is a long-running British science fiction television programme produced by the BBC about a mysterious time-travelling adventurer known only as "The Doctor", who explores time and space with his companions, fighting evil.
Rowan Atkinson as the Doctor and Julia Sawalha as Emma in the parody The Curse of Fatal Death.
The Doctor in his fourth incarnation (the one most Americans associate the Doctor with) has been represented on several episodes of The Simpsons, starting with the episode "Sideshow Bob's Last Gleaming" where (along with Krusty the Clown and Steve Urkel) he was part of a delegation to the Pentagon of "the esteemed representatives of television".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m