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Encyclopedia > Doctor Fate
Doctor Fate


Kent Nelson and Hector Hall from the promotional art for JSA: All-Stars #3 (September 2003) cover, by John Cassaday and Mark Lewis. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (563x780, 159 KB)Cover to JSA: All-Stars #3. ... John Cassaday is a comic book artist, best known for his work on Planetary with Warren Ellis, and Astonishing X-Men with Joss Whedon. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Vertigo
First appearance (Kent, Inza)
More Fun Comics #55 (May 1940)
(Strauss)
Doctor Fate #1 (July 1987)
(Hall)
(as Doctor Fate) JSA #3
Created by (Kent, Inza)
Gardner Fox
Howard Sherman
(Strauss)
Keith Giffen
J. M. DeMatteis
(Kent V.)
Steve Gerber
Justiniano and Walden Wong
Characteristics
Alter ego - Kent Nelson
- Eric & Linda Strauss
- Inza Kramer Nelson
- Jared Stevens
- Hector Hall
- Kent V. Nelson
Team
affiliations
(Kent)
All-Star Squadron
Justice Society of America
(Kent, Strauss)
Justice League
Notable aliases (Kent, Strauss, Inza)
Nabu
Abilities Manipulation of the magics of Order
Dr. Fate (vol. 1)
Doctor Fate (vol. 2 &3)
Publisher All DC Comics
Schedule All
Monthly
Format All
Standard U.S., 4 color.
Vol. 1 & 3: Limited series
Vol. 2: When published, ongoing.
Publication dates Vol. 1: July 1987 - October 1987
Vol. 2: Winter 1988 - June 1992
1989 (Annual)
Vol. 3: October 2003 - February 2004
Number of issues Vol. 1: 4
Vol. 2: 41, +1 (Annual)
Vol. 3: 5
Main character(s) Vol. 1 & 2: Kent Nelson
Vol. 2: Eric Strauss
Linda Strauss
Inza Kramer Nelson
Vol. 3: Hector Hall

Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. Created by writer Gardner Fox and artist Howard Sherman, he first appeared in More Fun Comics #55 (May 1940). DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... John Marc DeMatteis (born December 15, 1953) is an American writer of comic books. ... Stephen Ross Gerber (born 20 September 1947, St. ... Justiniano is an American comic book artist. ... Fate, a fictional character of DC Comics. ... Doctor Fate, as seen in Justice League Unlimited Doctor Fate is a comic book superhero and wizard in the DC Comics universe, and a member of the Justice Society of America. ... The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981-1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by DC Comics about the adventures of a large team of superheroes which comprised of most of the feature characters owned by the company that appeared in the Golden Age of Comic Books... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... The Lords of Chaos and Lords of Order are complementary groups of supernatural entities with godlike powers that appear in DC Comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode, see Super Hero (Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode). ... otheruses|Magician}} The Enchanted Garden of Messer Ansaldo by Marie Spartali Stillman: a magician makes his garden bear fruit and flowers in winter. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... More Fun Comics was a DC Comics title which began as New Fun Comics in February 1935 and changed to More Fun with its seventh issue. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


This was Kent Nelson, the best known and longest used Doctor Fate. He was an archeologist who discovered the tomb of the mystical being Nabu and was trained by him in the arts of magic. This July 2007 does not cite any references or sources. ... The Lords of Chaos and Lords of Order are complementary groups of supernatural entities with godlike powers that appear in DC Comics. ... The Sorceress by John William Waterhouse Magic and sorcery are the influencing of events, objects, people and physical phenomena by mystical, paranormal or supernatural means. ...


This character was also used by DC in its Golden Age all-star group the Justice Society of America and was an essential part of the group during its 1970s revival. Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Afterwards, DC introduced several new versions of Doctor Fate. These included: Eric and Linda Strauss, a man and woman who could merge to form Doctor Fate; Inza Nelson, Kent Nelson’s reincarnated wife; a mercenary named Jared Stevens who used Nelson’s weapons as simply Fate; a resurrected Hector Hall, the son of Justice Society of America members Hawkman and Hawkgirl, and Kent V. Nelson, grand-nephew of the original,[1] who begins his journey as Doctor Fate in Las Vegas (also home to the writer), with no awareness of his family's connection to mysticism. Reincarnation, literally to be made flesh again, is a doctrine or mystical belief that some essential part of a living being (in some variations only human beings) survives death to be reborn in a new body. ... A mercenary is a person who takes part in an armed conflict who is not a national of a Party to the conflict and is motivated to take part in the hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain and, in fact, is promised, by or on behalf of a... Fate, a fictional character of DC Comics. ... Doctor Fate, as seen in Justice League Unlimited Doctor Fate is a comic book superhero and wizard in the DC Comics universe, and a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Carter Hall is a DC Comics superhero, the original Hawkman. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ...


The revivals prior to Kent V. Nelson were relatively short-lived; and as such Doctor Fate's appearances in other media and comics set outside the continuity of the DC Universe (for instance, in the DC animated universe) tend to be of the original Golden Age Kent Nelson incarnation. Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... An image of many of the DCAU heroes. ...

Contents

Publication history

More Fun Comics #55 (May 1940) first introduced the character of Doctor Fate. A year later, in More Fun Comics #67 (May 1941), his alter ego of Kent Nelson and origins are introduced. After a year with little or no background, the character was presented as the son of an archaeologist who had discovered the tomb of an Egyptian wizard named Nabu. Visually, the character was unusual in that he wore a full face helm in his earliest appearances. It has been suggested that Nebo (god) be merged into this article or section. ... A person wearing a helmet. ...


When the Justice Society of America was being designed for All Star Comics #3, Doctor Fate was one of the characters National Allied Publications provided for the joint venture with All-American Publications. He continued to appear in the book through issue #23, many months after his own strip in More Fun Comics had ended. This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ...


In More Fun Comics #72 (Sept 1941), Doctor Fate's appearance was modified, exchanging the full helmet for a half-helmet so his lower face was exposed. The focus of the stories also shifted away from magic to more standard superhero action. By the end of the following year, the character had been changed into a medical doctor with more of the mystic elements being droped. The character's popularity waned faster than many of his contemporaries, and he disappeared from the scene before the 1940s were out.


Doctor Fate was revived along with many the Justice Society members in the 1960s through the annual team-ups with the Justice League of America. These stories established that the two teams resided on parallel worlds. Unlike many of his JSA teammates, Doctor Fate did not have an analogue or counterpart among the JLA. This was perhaps because the Silver Age revivals initiated by Julius Schwartz took a more science fictional bent, with which the character was not essentially compatible. In addition, this may have boosted his long-term popularity especially considering he is the closest counterpart the company has had to Marvel Comics' Doctor Strange. The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... The Earths of the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each one. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... Julius Schwartz, editor for DC Comics Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 - February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Doctor Strange is a fictional character, a comic book sorcerer and superhero in the Marvel Comics Universe. ...


Aside from the annual team up in Justice League of America, DC featured Doctor Fate in other stories through the 1960s and 1970s. These included: a two issue run teaming him with Hourman in Showcase, #55-56[2] (wherein it was revealed Kent Nelson and Inza Cramer had married since the end of the Golden Age); team-ups with Batman in The Brave and the Bold and with Superman in World's Finest Comics and DC Comics Presents; and a solo story in First Issue Special #9 (1975), written by Martin Pasko and drawn by Walt Simonson. Pasko's story added a major new aspect to the character: that the spirit of Nabu resided in the helmet and took control of Nelson whenever the helmet was donned. In the early 1980s, Roy Thomas incorporated this into his All-Star Squadron series, set in late 1941, as an explanation of the changes in the character's helmet and powers. (In a caption box on the final panel of Squadron #28's main story [December 1983], Thomas indicated an explanation of how and why Nelson returned to the full helmet and possession by Nabu when the JSA reactivated in the 1960s was forthcoming, but it was never published.) This led to DC featuring Kent and Inza, combining into one Doctor Fate, in a series of back-up stories beginning in The Flash #305 (February 1982) and running through #313 (September 1982). Keith Giffen drew all nine stories and Cary Bates wrote the initial one, with Pasko taking over as writer in issue #306, aided by Steve Gerber from #310 to #313. DC later collected these stories, the Pasko/Simonson one, a 1978 retelling of the origin by Paul Levitz, Mike Nasser & Joe Staton, and a previously unreprinted tale from the original 1940s run (specifically, the second, from More Fun #56), in the three-issue limited series titled The Immortal Dr. Fate. Hourman (spelled Hour-Man in his earliest appearances) is the name of three different fictional DC Comics superheroes the first of whom was created by Ken Fitch and Bernard Bailey in Adventure Comics #48 (April 1940), during the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Worlds Finest Comics was a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1941 to 1986. ... DC Comics Presents. ... First Issue Special was a short-lived anthology series from DC Comics, done in similiar style to their Showcase series. ... Star Slammers graphic novel (1983) Walter or, usually, Walt Simonson (born September 2, 1946) is a comic book writer and artist. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981-1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by DC Comics about the adventures of a large team of superheroes which comprised of most of the feature characters owned by the company that appeared in the Golden Age of Comic Books... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Cary Bates is a comic book and animation writer. ... Stephen Ross Gerber (born 20 September 1947, St. ... Paul Levitz (born 21 October 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. ... Joe Staton (born January 19, 1948 in North Carolina), is an American illustrator and writer of comic books. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...


Following 1985's Crisis on Infinite Earths, Doctor Fate briefly joined the Justice League and was the star of a self titled, four-issue limited series by J. M. DeMatteis and Keith Giffen. In this story Kent Nelson finally died of old age and the mantle of was passed to a pair of humans, Eric and Linda Strauss, who would merge into one being to become Doctor Fate (similar in this regard to Firestorm, and to Kent and Inza in the 1982 back-up feature). Nelson's body was reanimated by Nabu who, revealed to be a Lord of Order at this point, started calling himself Kent to help train the pair in their new role. Based on the success of the limited series, DC continued the story in a separate ongoing series, also titled Doctor Fate, by DeMatteis and Shawn McManus. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... John Marc DeMatteis (born December 15, 1953) is an American writer of comic books. ... Firestorm is a DC Comics superhero. ... The Lords of Chaos and Lords of Order are complementary groups of supernatural entities with godlike powers that appear in DC Comics. ... Shawn McManus caricature of Stan Lee Shawn McManus (born June 30, 1958 in Brookline, Massachusetts) is an American artist who entered the comic book field in the early 1980s. ...


After two years, the series and character shifted such that Nelson's wife Inza inherited the Doctor Fate mantle and starred in a year's worth of stories in which she tried to change the world for the better using her powers.


After this, DC retired the classic characters, and "Fate" replaced Doctor Fate. He was a mercenary whose weapons were the transformed helm and amulet of Doctor Fate. He starred in two of his own series, Fate and The Books of Fate, but both were canceled after relatively short runs.


In 1999, during the revival of the Justice Society in JSA, DC allowed the character to be reworked. The initial story arc mirrored the transition from Doctor Fate to Fate, the old character was killed and the mantel, along with the original name and a restored helm and amulet, was passed to a new character. In this case the character was a reincarnated Hector Hall, son of the Golden Age Hawkman and Hawkgirl. In addition to appearing in JSA, DC produced a self-titled, five-issue limited series featuring Hall in 2003 and positioned him as a prominent magical character in various company wide event stories. The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ...


The character was again set up for change during the Day of Vengeance limited series, part of the lead in to the 2005 company wide event story, Infinite Crisis. This included both Hall and Nabu being killed and the sole remaining artifact of Doctor Fate, the helmet, being sent to find a new wearer. Day of Vengeance #1; cover by Walter Simonson. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...


DC has since used the helmet as a character in the weekly limited series 52, where it is in the possession of, and acting as a guide for, Ralph Dibny. It is later revealed that it is not the Helm of Fate that Dibny was in possession of, but rather Felix Faust masquerading as the Helm. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Felix Faust is a fictional sorcerer and supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ...


In early 2007, DC published a series of bi-weekly one-shot comics featuring the helmet passing through the hands of various magical characters. These included the Shadowpact's Detective Chimp; Ibis the Invincible; Sargon the Sorcerer; Zauriel; and Black Alice.[3] The one-shots were intended to be followed by a new Doctor Fate title in February 2007, written by Steve Gerber and illustrated by Paul Gulacy, featuring Kent V. Nelson, Kent Nelson's grandnephew, as the helm's new wearer.[4] However, the series was delayed due to extended production and creative difficulties. According to Steve Gerber and Newsarama, the Doctor Fate title will instead be the first half of Countdown to Mystery, a dual-feature eight issue series with Eclipso as the second story, which is set to launch sometime in September 2007.[5][6] The Shadowpact is a group of magic-based heroes who fought against the Spectre in the 2005 limited series Day of Vengeance, published by DC Comics. ... In the fictional DC Universe, Detective Chimp (alias Bobo T. Chimpanzee) is a chimpanzee wearing a deerstalker (in honor of Sherlock Holmes) with human-level intelligence who solves crimes, often with the help of the Bureau of Amplified Animals, a group of intelligent animals, like Rex the Wonder Dog. ... Ibis the Invincible is a fictional character, a comic book superhero originally published by Fawcett Comics in the 1940s and then by DC Comics beginning in the 1970s. ... Sargon the Sorcerer is a fictional character, a second string mystic, superhero, sorcerer in DC Comics during the Golden age of comic books. ... Zauriel is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Black Alice is also the title of a novel by Thomas M. Disch and John Sladek, under the pseudonym Thom Demijohn Black Alice is a DC Comics character introduced in Birds of Prey #76 (January 2005). ... Paul Gulacy is an American Comic Book Artist. ... Newsarama. ...


Fictional biographies

Kent Nelson/Nabu

Kent Nelson, the son of Sven Nelson an American archaeologist, accompanies his father on an expedition to the Valley of Ur (not Egypt as is often, mistakenly reported) in the year 1920. When his father opens the tomb of the wizard Nabu, a posion gas was released which ultimately resulted in the death of Sven Nelson. Nabu takes pity on the orphaned Kent. The wizard raises him, teaching him the skills of a wizard and bestowing upon him a mystical helm and amulet. For other uses, see Ur (disambiguation). ... For the New York prison see The Tombs. ... An amulet from the Black Pullet grimoire An amulet (from Latin amuletum, meaning A means of protection) or a talisman (from Arabic tilasm, ultimately from Greek telesma or from the Greek word talein wich means to initiate into the mysteries. ...


(Nabu is named after a god from Babylonian mythology. The Nabu of the DC Universe may originally have been meant to be this god.) It has been suggested that Nebo (god) be merged into this article or section. ...

Kent Nelson as Doctor Fate featured in More Fun Comics #67 (May 1941).Art by Howard Sherman.
Kent Nelson as Doctor Fate featured in More Fun Comics #67 (May 1941).
Art by Howard Sherman.

By 1940, Nelson has returned to the United States and resides in an invisible tower in Salem, Massachusetts. From this sanctum he embarks on a career fighting crime and supernatural evil as the hero called Doctor Fate. During the early part of this career he meets, romances, and eventually marries a red-headed woman named Inza. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (700x982, 307 KB) This is an interior page from More Fun Comics #67, May, 1941. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (700x982, 307 KB) This is an interior page from More Fun Comics #67, May, 1941. ... More Fun Comics was a DC Comics title which began as New Fun Comics in February 1935 and changed to More Fun with its seventh issue. ... An example of how an object could appear to be invisible through the use of mirrors Invisibility is the state of an object which cannot be seen. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex County Settled 1626 Incorporated 1626 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kimberley Driscoll Area  - City  18. ... Look up Supernatural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Evil (disambiguation). ...


In late 1940, Doctor Fate is among the founding members of the Justice Society of America.[7] He remains active with the group through the middle of the decade, withdrawing in 1945. By the end of the decade he has withdrawn entirely from public activities, either retiring or turning his attention elsewhere. When the team comes out of retirement to work with the Justice League, he returns as well, rejoining his old teammates. Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


In 1942 he is forced to change the helmet he uses, changing to a half-helmet that leaves his lower face exposed. Partially this is due to Nabu's personality which resided in the full helmet and exerts some control over Nelson when he wears the helm.[8] The change, while stripping him of most of his sorcerous might, leaves Nelson in full control of his actions. Shortly thereafter, when a supervillain steals the Helm of Nabu, Nelson loses all access to the Helm as both it and the thief are cast into an alternate dimension.[9] At some point between his withdrawal from the JSA and his return, he is able to retrieve the Helm as he returns to wearing it and relying on Nabu's presence. Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ...


Even with the return of the JSA, Doctor Fate's activities are less than public. These include assisting fellow JSA member Hourman with Solomon Grundy and the Psycho-Pirate,[10] and Superman.[citation needed] Hourman (spelled Hour-Man in his earliest appearances) is the name of three different fictional DC Comics superheroes the first of whom was created by Ken Fitch and Bernard Bailey in Adventure Comics #48 (April 1940), during the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Solomon Grundy is a DC Comics character, a large, strong zombie supervillain. ... The Psycho-Pirate was the name of two DC comics supervillains. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


When the JSA re-establishes itself early in the modern age of heroes, Doctor Fate is among the returning members. Though he has become increasingly erratic and withdraw from humanity, he is still committed to protecting Earth against supernatural menaces. During this time Nelson also goes through a period where, in order to become Doctor Fate, he must fuse with his wife, Inza.


After helping to stop Darkseid's plans to discredit the heroes of Earth in the eyes of humanity, Kent, as the sole wearer of the Helm, joins the re-constituted Justice League. He serves for a time, but eventually the magics he was using to maintain his and Inza's youth fail. This results in the pair aging and passing away in a short span of time. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Eric and Linda Strauss

Justice League of America #31 (October 1989) featuring Linda Strauss as Doctor Fate. Cover Art by Adam Hughes.
Justice League of America #31 (October 1989) featuring Linda Strauss as Doctor Fate. Cover Art by Adam Hughes.

With the passing of Kent Nelson, Nabu begins the search for a new Doctor Fate. This search takes him to Eric and Linda Strauss. He binds them so that they must merge to become Doctor Fate, but otherwise lead separate lives. He then animates Kent Nelson's corpse to join them as an advisor and instructor. Since the tower Nelson used as a sanctum is apparently destroyed, the pair operate out of Linda's apartment. Over time they are joined by a small, kind demon they dub Petey and a lawyer named Jack C. Small. Petey and Jack provide moral support and manage to assist in some of the battles. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x755, 177 KB) Summary http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x755, 177 KB) Summary http://www. ... I am Adam Hughes. ...


During a battle on Apokolips Eric is killed, leaving Linda to carry on as Doctor Fate on her own. Eventually the Helm rejects her. Eric's soul is not allowed to pass on, but is instead placed in the dying body of Eugene DiBellia, who had been severely injured in a car crash. Eugene is the father of a cosmically important girl named Raina, who is to usher in a new age for mankind.


Even though she is no longer Doctor Fate, the Anti-Fate, Doctor Benjamin Stoner, returns to plague Linda. This forces her to merge with Nabu to become Doctor Fate once again. Before retreating, the Lords of Chaos succeed in assaulting Linda and killing her. Similar to Eric, her soul is placed in the dying body of Wendy DiBellia, Eugene's wife, so that she and Eric can take care of Raina. The DiBellias were always fated to die, but thanks to the timely intervention of the Phantom Stranger and a character serving as the human avatar of God, Raina is not left without her caretakers. The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics, sometimes under their Vertigo imprint. ...


Inza Nelson

Inza and Kent Nelson's souls, which had been inhabiting Doctor Fate's amulet, are resurrected in new young bodies. They find however that only Inza alone is able to become Doctor Fate. She begins to work toward improving their neighborhood, but Kent chides her constantly about what he feels is reckless use of magic.


As a female Doctor Fate, she spends her time striving to improve the lot of humanity, being, unlike her husband, a proactive Doctor Fate. Her inexperience in the actual use of magicks backfires at first, but she grows into her own after some time. Early on she is instrumental in defeating Circe who had orchestrated a war among the gods of antiquity.[11] This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ...


As she develops in her magicks, she also starts to expand in her proactive role. She becomes increasingly reckless in the way she uses her magicks. Slowly but surely people start to become dependent on her to solve every little problem. Instead of retreating, she makes matters worse as she develops spheres that respond to the people's wishes.


This abuse of Doctor Fate's magicks ends up separating Kent and Inza as they steadily find themselves opposing each other's actions. The Nelsons learn that a Lord of Chaos has taken residence in the Helm of Nabu and has been providing Inza with magic deriving from Chaos instead of Order. This Lord of Chaos is also the reason that they cannot merge and become Doctor Fate. Kent eventually returns to his wife's side and helps her defeat this Lord of Chaos. Inza then learns that she draws her new powers from the people of Earth, rather than Chaos or Order.


Inza continues her proactive behavior, causing the US government to take notice of her and put her on trial before Congress. After giving a stern lecture to the Congressmen, she temporarily turns them all into newts. “Eft” redirects here. ...


After defeating the Lord of Chaos, the Nelsons began merging as the male Doctor Fate again. The Nelsons did retain the ability though to become independent Doctor Fates if the situation called for it. In these cases Kent's form would resemble that of his days of using the half-helm.


In their last actions as Doctor Fate, the Nelsons, along with the rest of the JSA, face the supervillain Extant during the attempt by Parallax to change the history of the universe. Extant, with seeming ease, causes most of the JSAers to rapidly approach their proper physical ages. He also separates the Nelsons from the raiments of Doctor Fate, the Helm, Amulet, and cloak. The greatly aged and depowered Nelsons are returned to Salem and to a forced retirement.[12] Hank Hall is a fictional character in DC Comics who first appeared in Showcase #75 as Hawk of Hawk and Dove. ... Parallax is a fictional comic book villain from DC Comics. ... Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ...


Jared Stevens

Main article: Fate (comics)
Fate #1 (November 1994) featuring Jared Stevens, cover art by Anthony Williams and Andy Lanning.
Fate #1 (November 1994) featuring Jared Stevens, cover art by Anthony Williams and Andy Lanning.

After the return of the Nelsons to Earth, Jared Stevens discovers the raiments of Doctor Fate. He alters them into a knife, set of throwing darts, and an arm binding and begins a career as a balance between Order and Chaos as simply "Fate". His sole encounter with the Nelsons results in the death of the couple and the return of their souls to the Amulet. Fate, a fictional character of DC Comics. ... Image File history File links Fatejaredstevens. ... Image File history File links Fatejaredstevens. ... Anthony Williams is a Welsh comic book artist. ... Andy Lanning is a British comic book writer and inker. ...


His apparent end comes at the hands of Mordru as part of the dark wizard's attempt to inherit the mantel and artifacts of Doctor Fate.


Hector Hall

Main article: Hector Hall
Panel from JSA featuring Hector Hall as Doctor Fate. Art by Stephen Sadowski.
Panel from JSA featuring Hector Hall as Doctor Fate. Art by Stephen Sadowski.

Nabu, aware of Mordru's ambitions, has planned ahead to insure that his Helm and the mantle of Doctor Fate will pass to a reincarnated Hector Hall. This plan coincides with the rebirth of the Justice Society which acts to protect the newly reborn Hector. Doctor Fate, as seen in Justice League Unlimited Doctor Fate is a comic book superhero and wizard in the DC Comics universe, and a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Image File history File links Doctor Fate (formerly the Silver Scarab) from DC Comics JSA This work is copyrighted. ... Image File history File links Doctor Fate (formerly the Silver Scarab) from DC Comics JSA This work is copyrighted. ...


The nature of the body into which Hector is born defines a change in purpose for Doctor Fate. The child is the son of Hank Hall and Dawn Granger, agents of both Chaos and Order once known as Hawk and Dove. This makes the child an agent of balance instead of an agent of one side or the other. Hawk and Dove are the names used by a number of DC Comics superheroes who fight crime together as duos, despite their sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ...


Later the Spectre, attempting to expunge evil by extinguishing magic, confronts Hector. This results in him and his wife, Lyta, being banished to "Hell," a snowy mountain landscape, where he would be forced to spend eternity. After protecting his unconscious wife from a group of demons, Hector collapses, just as Lyta wakes. She reveals that she had communicated with her son Daniel Hall, now the Lord of Dreams, and made a deal. The two join their son in the Dreaming, seemingly giving up the mortal world forever.[13]
The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Fury was the codename of two DC Comics superheroines, who are mother and daughter. ... This article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ...


Nabu

Unaware of the reasons behind the disappearance of Hector Hall, his teammates in the Justice Society travel to the Tower of Fate, hoping to use his services to travel to the Fifth Dimension and find Jakeem Thunder. At the Tower they find the raiments of Fate, but not Hector. Seeking to call forth Nabu, Sand dons the raiments allowing Nabu speak and act through him. He prepares a spell through which some of the team can travel to the Fifth dimension. However, Mordru returns before the spell is complete and causes it to malfunction. Jakeem Johnny Thunder (initially called J.J. Thunder, a name he dislikes) is a fictional character published by DC Comics and a member of the current version of the superhero team the Justice Society of America. ... Sanderson Sandy Hawkins, formerly known as Sandy the Golden Boy, now known as Sand, is a fictional character, superhero in the DC Comics universe created by Mort Weisinger and Paul Norris. ...

Nabu confronts Mordru without the use of a host body in a panel from JSA #80. Art by Don Kramer.
Nabu confronts Mordru without the use of a host body in a panel from JSA #80. Art by Don Kramer.

In turn, Mordru subjugates the remaining JSA members and Nabu. Mordru seemingly crushes Nabu and his helmet, which restores Sand's freewill and he uses his powers and free himself and his teammates. They regroup and engage Mordru, allowing Nabu time to channel himself through the raiments of Doctor Fate without a host. He attacks Mordru, transporting him to differing dimensions in hopes of defeating him. (Among the alternate realities visited were those of Kingdom Come and JLA: The Nail.) Image File history File links NabuMordru. ... Image File history File links NabuMordru. ... // Character Biography Mordru (also known as Mordru the Merciless) is a fictional character, a supervillain in the DC Comics Universe whose main foes are the Legion of Super-Heroes in the future world of the 30th and 31st centuries and the Justice Society of America and the Lord of Order... Kingdom Come was a four-issue comic book limited series published in 1996 by DC Comics. ...


The two continue their struggle, with Mordru seeming to get the upper hand, until the arrival of Jakeem and the rest of the JSA. Jakeem and his Thunderbolt single-handedly subdue Mordru. The Justice Society offer Nabu membership, but he senses that a crisis is coming and that his presence is required elsewhere and disappears. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...


During the waning hours of the Ninth Age of Magic, Nabu calls together the remaining great magicians to deal with the Spectre and the destruction of the Rock of Eternity. Nabu personally confronts and goads the Spectre, whose anger grows so great that he fatally wounds Nabu. This causes the Presence to take notice and send the Spectre to his new host. As a result of Nabu impending death, the Ninth Age of Magic ends and the birth of the Tenth Age begins.


Before his death, Nabu gives the Helmet to Detective Chimp to give to the Doctor Fate of the new Age, telling him that the Helmet will still have certain abilities, even though Nabu will no longer be contained within it. After Detective Chimp finds that the Helmet will not fit him, he asks Captain Marvel to throw the helmet down to Earth and let it land where it will, letting Fate pick its next Doctor.[14] In the fictional DC Universe, Detective Chimp (alias Bobo T. Chimpanzee) is a chimpanzee wearing a deerstalker (in honor of Sherlock Holmes) with human-level intelligence who solves crimes, often with the help of the Bureau of Amplified Animals, a group of intelligent animals, like Rex the Wonder Dog. ... For other uses, see Captain Marvel. ...


52

Main article: 52 (comic book)
Promotional art for 52 Week Forty-Two (April 2007) cover, by J. G. Jones.

Felix Faust disguises himself as Nabu in the Helmet of Fate, and attempts to trick Ralph Dibny into trading his soul for Faust's freedom from Neron by telling Dibny how to resurrect his dead wife, Sue. In his masquerade, Faust kills Tim Trench and fools the Shadowpact, but is found out by Dibny, who dies after binding Faust and Neron within the Tower of Fate. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... J. G. Jones is an American comic book artist. ... Felix Faust is a fictional sorcerer and supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Neron is also an alternative name of the Roman Emperor Nero. ... Tim Trench is a fictional comic book hero in the DC Comics universe. ...


One Year Later

Main article: One Year Later
Promotional art for Doctor Fate #1 cover, art by Paul Gulacy.
Promotional art for Doctor Fate #1 cover, art by Paul Gulacy.

The helmet resurfaces a year after Infinite Crisis, crossing paths with various heroes. In these appearances it resembles the half-helm that Kent Nelson used during the 1940s. One Year Later event logo. ... Image File history File links DrFateVol4No1. ... Image File history File links DrFateVol4No1. ... Paul Gulacy is an American Comic Book Artist. ...


It returns again to the possession of Detective Chimp, who finds he can now wear the altered helmet. After acting as Doctor Fate for a short time, he decides he does not have the temperament to wear the helmet and sends it on its way. In the fictional DC Universe, Detective Chimp (alias Bobo T. Chimpanzee) is a chimpanzee wearing a deerstalker (in honor of Sherlock Holmes) with human-level intelligence who solves crimes, often with the help of the Bureau of Amplified Animals, a group of intelligent animals, like Rex the Wonder Dog. ...


Next, the helm comes into the possession of Ibis the Invincible, and attracts the attention of the dark god Set. Set defeats Ibis, forcing the hero to retreat into hibernation as a mummy to heal. Ibis' last act is to find a replacement. The new Ibis confronts Set, retrieves the helmet and then sends it on. Ibis the Invincible is a fictional character, a comic book superhero originally published by Fawcett Comics in the 1940s and then by DC Comics beginning in the 1970s. ... In Egyptian mythology, Set (also spelled Sutekh, Setesh, Seteh, Seth) is an ancient god, who was originally the god of the desert, one of the two main biomes that constitutes Egypt, the other being the small fertile area on either side of the Nile. ...


Travelling from place to place, the helm is interrupted by the spirit of Sargon the Sorcerer, who diverts it in an effort to protect his grandson, David. David bestows something of himself into the helmet before returning it to its journey. Sargon the Sorcerer is a fictional character, a second string mystic, superhero, sorcerer in DC Comics during the Golden age of comic books. ...


Black Alice is the next recipient, who unsuccessfully tries to make the helm obey her. When the helmet starts to indiscriminately punish everyone who wronged her, including her loved ones, she realises the helmet would fulfill her desires, but destroy her life in the process. Black Alice then relinquishes it. Black Alice is also the title of a novel by Thomas M. Disch and John Sladek, under the pseudonym Thom Demijohn Black Alice is a DC Comics character introduced in Birds of Prey #76 (January 2005). ...


The helmet crosses paths with the angel Zauriel, and then falls to Kent V. Nelson, the original Kent Nelson’s grandnephew, who becomes the new Doctor Fate. Zauriel is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ...


Originally intended as the start of a new series, Steve Gerber's health caused delays such that it will now be serialized in a new anthology titled Countdown to Mystery. This anthology series will be shared with Eclipso. Stephen Ross Gerber (born 20 September 1947, St. ... Eclipso is a fictional character, a villain in the DC Comics Universe. ...


Other versions of Doctor Fate

Doctor Chaos artist Kurt Schaffenberger
Doctor Chaos
artist Kurt Schaffenberger

Image File history File links Doctorchaosdcu0. ... Image File history File links Doctorchaosdcu0. ... Kurt Schaffenberger (December 15, 1920-January 24, 2002) was an American comic book artist. ...

Doctor Chaos (Earth-One)

In New Adventures of Superboy #25 (January 1982), Professor Lewis Lang and his assistant Burt Belker discover a helmet identical to the one used by Nabu in the Valley of Ur which contained a Lord of Chaos. The Lord of Chaos possesses Burt to become Doctor Chaos, whose agenda differs from the one of Earth-Two's Doctor Fate. Doctor Chaos' costume mirrors Doctor Fate's, with an opposite color scheme. Superboy confronts him and is able to remove the helmet from Belker and jettison it into space. Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ...


There was no record of the helmet ever returning to Earth, and the merging of alternate universes during the Crisis on Infinite Earths removed the occurrence from DC Universe continuity. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


Fate (Kingdom Come)

The limited series Kingdom Come featured a version of Nabu, similar to his later appearance before his death, who was able to channel his consciousness through the Helm and Cloak without the need for a host body. This version of Fate sided with Batman's group during the series, and was amongst the survivors at the end of the story.


Future (Books of Magic)

In the fourth Book of the Books of Magic limited series by Neil Gaiman, Mister E shows a future version of Doctor Fate to Timothy Hunter. This one is a corrupt version of the Helmet which looks like a human skull. It would ultimately kill any of its worshippers that wears it. This one no longer cares about the war between Order and Chaos and believes that there is no meaning in life; just flesh and death. Mister E says he wanted to kill Doctor Fate and destroy the helm long ago, but the Justice League prevented him. (Note: In the first book, Hunter and the Phantom Stranger observe Kent Nelson, though Nelson was not aware of their presence.) Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Mister E is a fictional character that has appears mainly in the Vertigo comics universe, though he sometimes appears in the DC Comics universe. ... Timothy Hunter (often called Tim Hunter) is a fictional comic book character in the DC Comics universe, a young sorcerer who first appeared in the four-issue miniseries The Books of Magic (1990-91), written by Neil Gaiman, with painted art by John Bolton. ...


Doctor Strangefate (Amalgam Comics)

In the Amalgam Comics published jointly by DC and Marvel Comics, Doctor Strangefate is equivalent of Doctor Fate combined with Doctor Strange and Charles Xavier of Marvel Comics. His powers are based on both Doctors, but Charles Xavier is the man under the helmet. Doctor Strangefate is the protector of the Amalgam Comics universe, built up the universe around him from the battle between DC Comics and Marvel Comics respectively, and would literally kill to prevent his world from collapsing. Amalgam Comics was a metafictional American comic book publisher, and part of a collaboration between Marvel Comics and DC Comics, in which the two comic book publishers merged their characters to create new ones (e. ... Doctor Strangefate is an Amalgam Comics superhero who debuted in Doctor Strangefate #1, but his metafictional debut in Amalgam Comics continuity was Tales of Strangefate #1. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ...


52

In the final issue of 52, a new Multiverse is revealed, originally consisting of 52 identical realities. Among the parallel realities shown is one designated "Earth-2". As a result of Mister Mind "eating" aspects of this reality, it takes on visual aspects similar to the pre-Crisis Earth-2, including Doctor Fate, among other Justice Society of America characters. The names of the characters and the team are not mentioned in the panel in which they appear, but the Doctor Fate is visually similar to the Nelson, Strauss, and Hall versions.[15] 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Prominent members of the Monster Society Of Evil. ...


Based on comments by Grant Morrison, this alternate universe is not the pre-Crisis Earth-2.[16] Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ...


Powers and abilities

Doctor Fate possesses a variety of mystical powers. In general, even without wearing the Helmet of Nabu, the host can fly, is resistant to damage, has minor telekinesis, and has greater-than-human strength. A hummingbird Female Mallard Duck in midflight A dragonfly in flight Flight is the process by which an object achieves sustained movement either through the air by aerodynamically generating lift or aerostatically using buoyancy, or movement beyond earths atmosphere, in the case of spaceflight. ... The term psychokinesis (from the Greek ψυχή, psyche, meaning mind, soul, or breath; and κίνησις, kinesis, meaning motion; literally movement from the mind)[1][2] or PK, also known as telekinesis[3] (Greek + , literally distant-movement referring to telekinesis) or TK, denotes the paranormal ability of the mind to influence matter, time... Superhuman strength, also called super strength or enhanced strength, is an ability commonly utilized in fiction. ...


At his most potent, Doctor Fate is an accomplished sorcerer, able to match most other wizards in the DC Universe. He has been credited in DC's Who's Who as being one of the top 12 most powerful heroes in the DC Universe.


Doctor Fate has been observed throwing bolts of mystical energy, teleporting across the universe, crafting solid objects out of energy, and transforming objects into other kinds of matter. The full limits of his magical skills are unknown, and have varied greatly from one appearance to the next depending on the needs of the story. For example: In Swamp Thing #50 (July 1986), he slays the demon Abnegazar of the Demons Three with very little effort. Conversely in Justice League of America #148 (November 1977), the Demons Three control him and set him against his fellow heroes. The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... Abnegazar, Rath and Ghast are three fictional characters in the DC Universe. ...


At perhaps the peak of his abilities, he was able to take control of Etrigan the Demon, Darkseid, Highfather and Orion and harness their powers to take on the Anti-Life entity. In this instance, he was powerful enough to destroy a reality in order to halt the advance of the entity using a "Mystic Firebreak". As powerful as he is, he has been shown to be on the losing side of drawn out battles with the Spectre, as shown in the recent Day of Vengeance series. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Highfather is a comic book character. ... Orion is a fictional deity published by DC Comics. ...


Over time, Marvel Comics' Doctor Strange has evolved to be somewhat similar to Doctor Fate, in that both possess amulets which can emit beams of light, and both live in mysterious abodes filled with mystical books and objects. Fate is considerably more withdrawn from humanity in both demeanor and locale than is the Manhattan-based Strange. Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ...


Helm of Nabu

The helmet that Doctor Fate wears is the focus of the Doctor Fate identity. It originally housed Nabu's spirit and allowed him to possess the current host, it later only allowed him to advise the host instead. The helmet is what provides the link to Nabu and by not wearing it, as Kent Nelson did at one time, Doctor Fate loses much of its power and knowledge.


Putting on the helmet usually results in its wearer being clad in the other raiments of Doctor Fate, unless the one with the actual claim to the helmet wants to prevent it. On several occasions, villains seeking the power of Doctor Fate have stolen the helmet, in which case the result has typically been that the wearer goes insane when they try to put on the helmet.


Amulet of Anubis

The circular device that adorns the livery collar worn around Doctor Fate's chest and shoulders is the Amulet of Anubis, which gives anyone who wears it vast magical abilities. It holds many similarities to the Amulet of Agamotto of Marvel Comics character Doctor Strange, with both Amulets being capable of revealing and recognizing magical characters. The amulet has also been shown to house the souls of many who have worn the vestments of Fate. In JSA, the amulet contained the image of a farmhouse with the souls of Kent and Inza Nelson, Eric and Linda Strauss, Jared Stevens and Kid Eternity inhabiting it. This dimension was used more than once as a refuge for the JSA to regroup in battle or access the advice of previous Doctor Fates. Mordru was imprisoned in this dimension for some time. Sir Thomas More wearing the Collar of Esses as Lord Chancellor, by Hans Holbein the Younger (1527). ... Hit Comics #41 (July, 1946), Quality Comics Kid Eternity is a comic book superhero who first premired in Hit Comics #25, published by Quality Comics in December, 1942. ...


Awards

Both the character and the comics of the same name have received recognition, including:

  • 1963 Alley Award for Strip Favored for Revival
  • 1965 Alley Award for Best Revived Hero

Other media

Doctor Fate has guest appeared in animated form on Superman: The Animated Series, Justice League, and became a member of the Justice League in Justice League Unlimited. The Doctor Fate in those series is the Kent Nelson version. In Superman: The Animated Series George Del Hoyo provided his voice. In his return appearances in the Justice League series, Oded Fehr provides his voice. Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Oded Fehr (Hebrew: עודד פר) (born 23 November 1970) is an Israeli film and television actor. ...


In his Superman appearance, "The Hand of Fate", Superman goes to seek Fate's help when a supernatural threat named Karkull, whom Fate is responsible for defeating previously, invades and conquers the Daily Planet. At first, this Fate, who is animated as being middle-aged, refuses to get involved because he is tired of the eternal struggle between "good" and "evil". Superman's insistence on returning to fight on his own, despite his success being unlikely, inspires Fate to join the good fight again. The Daily Planet is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ...


This fatigue with mortal concerns has continued in his animated incarnations, as seen in his next appearance on Justice League entitled "The Terror Beyond". He and Aquaman help Solomon Grundy escape from the authorities so they can enact an age-old spell to save this dimension from an invasion by the Old Ones, creatures based on the writings of H. P. Lovecraft. They are stopped by the League and end up fighting the Old Ones in their own dimension. Aquaman is a fictional character, a superhero in DC Comics. ... Solomon Grundy is a DC Comics character, a large, strong zombie supervillain. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author from Providence, Rhode Island of fantasy, horror and science fiction. ...


Only after this episode does it seem that Fate maintains any continual relationship with fellow superheroes (miscommunication being the reason for the struggles between him and the League in "Terror"), including joining the expanded League in Unlimited. However, he is still not much of a team player, maintaining his own little mini-League of outsiders within the League. This team is a disguised version of Marvel Comics' Defenders; including Aquaman for Sub-Mariner, Hawkgirl for Nighthawk, Solomon Grundy for the Hulk and Amazo for the Silver Surfer. Fate is a stand-in for Doctor Strange. The Defenders are a Marvel Comics superhero group — usually presented as a non-team of individualistic outsiders each known for following their own agendas — that usually battles mystic and supernatural threats. ... Hawkgirl Hawkgirl appears in the animated Justice League series on Cartoon Network. ... Amazo is a fictional android from DC Comics. ...


Action Figures

Justice League Unlimited action figure by Mattel.
Justice League Unlimited action figure by Mattel.

To date, three versions of Doctor Fate have been made available in action figure form. The first Doctor Fate toy was released in 1985 under the second wave of Kenner's Super Powers Collection. The Super Powers Collection version also included a mini-comic book. In the book, Doctor Fate was forced to fight Superman and the Martian Manhunter who had fallen under control of Darkseid and were sent by him to collect Doctor Fate's artifacts. Image File history File links Dr_Fate_Mattel_Figure. ... Image File history File links Dr_Fate_Mattel_Figure. ... Mattel Inc. ... Zarbon action figure of from Dragon Ball Z made by Bandai An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, video game, or television program. ... The Super Powers Collection was a line of action figures based on DC Comics superheroes and supervillains that was created by Kenner Toys in the 1980s. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


DC Direct released the second in 2000 as part of the Mystics, Mages and Magicians collection. DC Direct[1] is the exclusive collectibles division of DC Comics, the Time Warner subsidiary that publishes comic books and licenses characters such as Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Flash, Batman, Batgirl and Hawkgirl. ...


The third was released with the Justice League Unlimited series several times as a single figure and as part of three-pack collections. Also, Minimates has released a 2-pack featuring Dr.Fate and Power Girl.


All versions were the Kent Nelson form of Doctor Fate.


A full-size replica helmet and amulet was announced by DC Direct at the 2004 San Diego Comic-Con International, for release in 2005.[17] It was besieged by manufacturing problem and delays and was never released. In September of 2006, the DC website indicated that DC Direct "hope(s) to have this great replica ready in 2007."[18]
Comic-Con International, commonly known as Comic-Con or the San Diego Comic-Con, is an annual multigenre fan convention founded as the Golden State Comic Book Convention and later the San Diego Comic Book Convention in 1970 by Shel Dorf and a group of San Diegans. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.stevegerber.com/sgblog/2007/03/03/some-thoughts-on-doctor-fate-part-1/
  2. ^ Hamilton, M. (2005-08-03). SHOWCASE #55: The Glory of Murphy Anderson. the comic book bin. Retrieved on 2007-02-11.
  3. ^ Brady, Matt (2006-10-12). Dr. Fate's Helmet Tours the DCU Before Return Next Spring. Newsarama. Retrieved on 2007-02-11.
  4. ^ McLauchlin, Jim (2006-12-03). A Twist of Fate. Wizard. Retrieved on 2007-02-11.
  5. ^ DC Announcement. stevegerblog (2007-06-15). Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  6. ^ Heroes Con/WW: Philly '07 - DC's Counting on More Countdown. Newsarama (2007-06-17). Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  7. ^  Fox, Gardner (w),  Hibbard, Everett (p),  All Star Comics v1 #3 Winter, 1940  DC Comics (1-4)
  8. ^  Pasko, Martin (w),  Simonson, Walt (p),  First Issue Special v1 #9 December, 1975  DC Comics
  9. ^  Thomas, Roy (w),  Howell, Richard (p), "A Spectre Is Haunting the Multiverse!" All-Star Squadron v1 #27 November, 1983  DC Comics
  10. ^  Fox, Gardner (w),  Anderson, Murphy (p),  Showcase v1 #55-56 March/April & May/June, 1965  DC Comics
  11. ^  Perez, George and Braun,Russell (w),  Perez, George and Braun,Russell (p),  War of the Gods v1 #1-4 September through December, 1991  DC Comics
  12. ^  Jurgens, Dan (w),  Jurgens, Dan (p),  Zero Hour v1 #4-0 September, 1994  DC Comics
  13. ^  Champagne, Keith (w),  Kramer, Don (p),  JSA v1 #79-80 January and February, 2006  DC Comics
  14. ^  Willingham, Bill (w),  Justiniano (p), "The Ninth Age of Magic" Day of Vengeance Infinite Crisis Special v1 #1 March, 2006  DC Comics
  15. ^  52 #52 May 2, 2007  DC Comics (13/3)
  16. ^ Brady, Matt (2007-05-08). "THE 52 EXIT INTERVIEWS: GRANT MORRISON". Newsarama. Retrieved on 2007-05-12.
  17. ^ 2004 San Diego Comic Con International: DC Direct. Raving Toy Maniac. Retrieved on 2007-02-11.
  18. ^ Ask DC Direct: #9. Time/Warner (2006-09-13). Retrieved on 2007-02-11.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Star Slammers graphic novel (1983) Walter or, usually, Walt Simonson (born September 2, 1946) is a comic book writer and artist. ... First Issue Special was a short-lived anthology series from DC Comics, done in similiar style to their Showcase series. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Richard Howell (Newark, Delaware, in 1753; died in Trenton, New Jersey, 28 April, 1802) was a state Governor of New Jersey from 1794 to 1802. ... The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981-1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by DC Comics about the adventures of a large team of superheroes which comprised of most of the feature characters owned by the company that appeared in the Golden Age of Comic Books... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Murphy Anderson (born 1926) is an American comic book penciller and inker who has worked for companies such as DC Comics for over 50 years, starting in the 1930s-40s Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... George Pérez (born June 9, 1954 in The Bronx, New York) is a Puerto Rican-American illustrator and writer of comic books. ... Russell Braun is a Canadian operatic lyric baritone. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Don Kramer is a Korean-born American comics artist. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Bill Willingham (born December 1956 in Fort Belvoir, Virginia) is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... Justiniano is an American comic book artist. ... Day of Vengeance #1; cover by Walter Simonson. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • [1] Comic Book Awards Almanac
  • The Grand Comics Database Project - Links to the various volumes of Doctor Fate.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Doctor Fate - Answers.com (4202 words)
Fate was revived along with the rest of the JSA in the 1960s through the annual team-ups with the Justice League of America, who were established as residing on a parallel world from the JSA.
In 1999, the Fate character was retired in the new JSA series, and Doctor Fate returned in the person of Hector Hall, the former Silver Scarab, and the son of the Golden Age Hawkman and Hawkgirl and father of the new Dream.
Fate was also a member of the JSA in the 1970s, though he had become increasingly erratic and withdrawn from humanity, though still committed to protecting Earth against supernatural menaces.
Dr. Fate (2452 words)
Doctor Fate is a comic book superhero and wizard in the DC Comics universe, and a member of the Justice Society of America.
In the late 1990s, the Fate character was retired in the new JSA series, and Doctor Fate returned in the person of Hector Hall, the former Silver Scarab, and the son of the Golden Age Hawkman and Hawkgirl.
As a female Doctor Fate, she spent a couple of years striving to improve the lot of humanity, later aided by Kent once he was able to regain his Superman-esque powers of earlier years.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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