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Encyclopedia > Docosanol
Docosanol
Systematic (IUPAC) name
docosan-1-ol
Identifiers
CAS number 661-19-8
ATC code D06BB11
PubChem 12620
DrugBank APRD00933
Chemical data
Formula C22H46O 
Mol. mass 326.6 g/mol
SMILES eMolecules & PubChem
Synonyms 1-Docosanol, n-docosanol, docosyl alcohol, behenic alcohol, behenyl alcohol, Cachalot BE-22, Dehydag wax 22 (lanette), Emery 3304, Loxiol VPG 1451
Physical data
Melt. point 71 °C (160 °F)
Boiling point 180 °C (356 °F)
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability Not absorbed
Metabolism N/A
Half life N/A
Excretion  ?
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.

B(US) IUPAC nomenclature is a system of naming chemical compounds and of describing the science of chemistry in general. ... CAS registry numbers are unique numerical identifiers for chemical compounds, polymers, biological sequences, mixtures and alloys. ... The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System is used for the classification of drugs. ... A section of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. ... PubChem is a database of chemical molecules. ... The DrugBank database available at the University of Alberta is a unique bioinformatics and cheminformatics resource that combines detailed drug (i. ... A chemical formula is an easy way of expressing information about the atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound. ... For other uses, see Carbon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemistry of hydrogen. ... This article is about the chemical element and its most stable form, or dioxygen. ... The molecular mass (abbreviated Mr) of a substance, formerly also called molecular weight and abbreviated as MW, is the mass of one molecule of that substance, relative to the unified atomic mass unit u (equal to 1/12 the mass of one atom of carbon-12). ... The simplified molecular input line entry specification or SMILES is a specification for unambiguously describing the structure of chemical molecules using short ASCII strings. ... Synonyms (in ancient Greek, συν (syn) = plus and όνομα (onoma) = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ... The melting point of a solid is the temperature range at which it changes state from solid to liquid. ... Italic text This article is about the boiling point of liquids. ... In pharmacology, bioavailability is used to describe the fraction of an administered dose of unchanged drug that reaches the systemic circulation, one of the principal pharmacokinetic properties of drugs. ... Drug metabolism is the metabolism of drugs, their biochemical modification or degradation, usually through specialized enzymatic systems. ... The biological half-life of a substance is the time required for half of that substance to be removed from an organism by either a physical or a chemical process. ... The kidneys are important excretory organs in vertebrates. ... The pregnancy category of a pharmaceutical agent is an assessment of the risk of fetal injury due to the pharmaceutical, if it is used as directed by the mother during pregnancy. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...

Legal status

OTC(US) The regulation of therapeutic goods, that is drugs and therapeutic devices, varies by jurisdiction. ... Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are medicines that may be sold without a prescription, in contrast to prescription drugs. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...

Routes Topical

Docosanol, also known as behenyl alcohol, is a saturated fatty alcohol used mainly as an antiviral agent, specifically for treatment of "cold sores" caused by the herpes simplex virus. It is normally administered topically in a cream containing a base and a 10% mix of the active ingredient. In pharmacology and toxicology, a route of administration is the path by which a drug, fluid, poison or other substance is brought into contact with the body. ... In medicine, a topical medication is applied to body surfaces such as the skin or mucous membranes such as the vagina, nasopharynx, or the eye. ... In chemistry, saturation has four different meanings: In physical chemistry, saturation is the point at which a solution of a substance can dissolve no more of that substance and additional amounts of that substance will appear as a precipitate. ... Fatty alcohols are aliphatic alcohols derived from natural fats and oils, originating in plants, but also synthesized in animals and algae. ... Antiviral drugs are a class of medication used specifically for treating viral infections. ... This article is about the disease. ... Species Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) This article is about the virus. ...


It functions by inhibiting the fusion of the human host cell with the viral envelope of the herpes virus, thus preventing its replication. Many viruses (e. ... Viral replication is the term used by virologists to describe the propagation of biological viruses during the infection process in the target host cells. ...


Docosanol was approved for use after clinical trials by the FDA in July 2000.[1] It was shown to shorten the healing by about 1 day. Marketed by Avanir Pharmaceuticals under the brand name Abreva, it was the first over-the-counter antiviral drug approved for sale in the United States and Canada. In March, 2007 it was the subject of a US nationwide class-action suit against Avanir and GlaxoSmithKline as the claim that it cut recovery times in half was found to have been misleading in a California court.[2] The United States Food and Drug Administration is the government agency responsible for regulating food, dietary supplements, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, biologics and blood products in the United States. ... Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are medicines that may be sold without a prescription, in contrast to prescription drugs. ... Antiviral drugs are a class of medication used specifically for treating viral infections. ... March 2007 is the third month of the year. ...


See also

Behenic acid, also docosanoic acid, is a normal carboxylic acid, a fatty acid with formula C21H43COOH. In appearance, it consists of white to cream color crystals or powder with a melting point of 74-78°C and boiling point of 306°C. At 9%, it is a major component of...

References

External links

Neuraminidase inhibitors are a class of antiviral drugs, whose mode of action relies on blocking the function of viral neuraminidase protein, thus preventing the virus from budding from the host cell. ... Oseltamivir (INN) (IPA: ) is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment and prophylaxis of both Influenzavirus A and Influenzavirus B. Like zanamivir, oseltamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor. ... Zanamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor used in the treatment of and prophylaxis of both influenza A and influenza B. Zanamivir was the first neuraminidase inhibitor commercially developed. ... Peramivir is a pharmaceutical drug used to viral infections. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... A reverse transcribing virus is any virus which replicates using reverse transcription, the formation of DNA from an RNA template. ... Inosine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when hypoxanthine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N9-glycosidic bond. ... Interferons (IFNs) are natural proteins produced by the cells of the immune system of most vertebrates in response to challenges by foreign agents such as viruses, bacteria, parasites and tumor cells. ... This box:      In health care, a clinical trial is a comparison test of a medication or other medical treatment (such as a medical device), versus a placebo (inactive look-a-like), other medications or devices, or the standard medical treatment for a patients condition. ... “FDA” redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
docosanol topical (1138 words)
Docosanol is an antiviral medication used to treat cold sore infections caused by the herpes simplex virus.
Docosanol topical is used to treat cold sores on the face and lips.
Docosanol topical should be applied at the very first sign of a cold sore, such as the tingle, redness, bump, or itch.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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