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Encyclopedia > Dizziness
Symptom/Sign: Dizziness
Classifications and external resources
ICD-10 R42.
ICD-9 780.4
DiseasesDB 17771
eMedicine neuro/693 

Many different terms are often used to describe what is collectively known as dizziness. Common descriptions include words such as lightheaded, floating, woozy, giddy, confused, helpless or fuzzy. Vertigo, Disequilibrium and Pre-syncope are the terms in use by most doctors. Dizziness is sometimes a symptom of a balance disorder. The term symptom (from the Greek meaning chance, mishap or casualty, itself derived from συμπιπτω meaning to fall upon or to happen to) has two similar meanings in the context of physical and mental health: Strictly, a symptom is a sensation or change in health function experienced by a patient. ... In medicine, a sign is a feature of disease as detected by the doctor during physical examination of a patient. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). ... // R00-R99 - Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00-R09) Symptoms and signs involving the circulatory and respiratory systems (R00) Abnormalities of heart beat (R000) Tachycardia, unspecified (R001) Bradycardia, unspecified (R002) Palpitations (R008) Other and unspecified abnormalities of heart beat (R01) Cardiac murmurs and other... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The Disease Bold textDatabase is a free website that provides information about the relationships between medical conditions, symptoms, and medications. ... eMedicine is an online clinical medical knowledge base that was founded in 1996. ... The Woozy is a fictional creature in the childrens novel The Patchwork Girl of Oz by L. Frank Baum. ... Balance is the result of a number of body systems working together. ...

Contents

Vertigo

Main article: vertigo (medical)

The word "vertigo" comes from the Latin "vertere", to turn + the suffix "-igo", a condition = a condition of turning about. For other uses, see Vertigo. ...


Vertigo is a specific medical term used to describe the sensation of spinning or having the room spin about you. Most people find vertigo very disturbing and often report associated nausea and vomiting.[weasel words] For other uses, see Vertigo. ...


Otologic causes of vertigo:


Typically if the vertigo arises from the inner ear, it is severe and has associated Nausea and vomiting. One common cause of otologic vertigo is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo BPPV. Alternate causes of vertigo originating from the inner ear include Ménière's disease, superior canal dehiscence syndrome and labyrinthitis. For other uses, see Nausea (disambiguation). ... Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) (or Benign paroxysmal vertigo) is a condition caused by problems in the inner ear. ... Ménières disease is a disorder of the inner ear that can affect hearing and balance. ... Labyrinthitis is a balance disorder that usually follows an upper respiratory tract infection (URI). ...


Central nervous system causes of vertigo:


If vertigo arises from the balance centers of the brain, it is typically more mild, and usually has accompanying neurologic deficits, such as slurred speech, double vision or nystagmus. Alternately, brain pathology can cause a sensation of disequilibrium which is an off-balance sensation. Double vision may refer to: Diplopia, the perception of two images from a single object. ... Nystagmus is involuntary eye movement that can be part of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), with the eyes moving first in the direction of the lesioned side (slow phase) followed by a quick correction (fast phase) to the opposite side or away from the lesioned side. ...


Often vertigo can be treated by the Epley manoeuvre.


Disequilibrium

Disequilibrium is the sensation of being off balance, and is most often characterized by frequent falls in a specific direction. This condition is not often associated with nausea or vomiting. Equilibrioception or sense of balance is one of the physiological senses. ...


Pre-syncope

Pre-syncope is most often described as lightheaded or feeling faint. Syncope, by contrast, is actually fainting. Pre-syncope, or lightheadedness, does not result from primary central nervous system pathology. Nor does it originate in the inner ear. It is most often cardiovascular in etiology. In many patients, lightheadedness is a symptom of orthostatic hypotension. Orthostatic hypotension occurs when the blood pressure drops significantly when the patient stands from a supine or seated position. If loss of consciousness occurs in this situation, it is termed syncope. It has been suggested that Central Ischaemic Response be merged into this article or section. ... Light-headedness is a common and often unpleasant sensation of dizziness and/or feeling that one may be about to faint, which may be transient, recurrent, or occasionally chronic. ... Orthostatic hypotension (also known as postural hypotension, orthostatic intolerance and, colloquially, as head rush or a dizzy spell) is a sudden fall in blood pressure, typically greater than 20/10 mm Hg, that occurs when a person assumes a standing position, usually after a prolonged period of rest. ... It has been suggested that Central Ischaemic Response be merged into this article or section. ...


External links

  • Citizendium on Dizziness
  • Dizzytimes.com Online Community for Sufferers of Vertigo and Dizziness

See also

Motion sickness or kinetosis is a condition in which a disagreement exists between visually perceived movement and the vestibular systems sense of movement. ... Balance is the result of a number of body systems working together. ... For other uses, see Vertigo. ... It has been suggested that Central Ischaemic Response be merged into this article or section. ... Equilibrioception or sense of balance is one of the physiological senses. ... The term symptom (from the Greek meaning chance, mishap or casualty, itself derived from συμπιπτω meaning to fall upon or to happen to) has two similar meanings in the context of physical and mental health: Strictly, a symptom is a sensation or change in health function experienced by a patient. ... In medicine, a sign is a feature of disease as detected by the doctor during physical examination of a patient. ... // R00-R99 - Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00-R09) Symptoms and signs involving the circulatory and respiratory systems (R00) Abnormalities of heart beat (R000) Tachycardia, unspecified (R001) Bradycardia, unspecified (R002) Palpitations (R008) Other and unspecified abnormalities of heart beat (R01) Cardiac murmurs and other... For transport in plants, see Vascular tissue. ... The Respiratory System Among four-legged animals, the respiratory system generally includes tubes, such as the bronchi, used to carry air to the lungs, where gas exchange takes place. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Bradycardia, as applied to adult medicine, is defined as a resting heart rate of under 60 beats per minute, though it is seldom symptomatic until the rate drops below 50 beat/min. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Murmurs are abnormal heart sounds that are produced as a result of turbulent blood flow which is sufficient to produce audible noise. ... Gangrene is the necrosis and subsequent decay of body tissues caused by infection or thrombosis. ... For the plant referred to as nosebleed plant, see Yarrow. ... Hemoptysis (US English) or haemoptysis (International English) is the expectoration (coughing up) of blood or of blood-stained sputum from the bronchi, larynx, trachea, or lungs (e. ... Dyspnea (R06. ... Orthopnoea is breathing difficulty which occurs when lying flat. ... Stridor is a high pitched sound heard on inspiration that is indicative of airway obstruction. ... A wheeze is a continuous, coarse, whistling sound produced in the respiratory airways during breathing. ... Cheyne-Stokes respiration is an abnormality of the pattern of breathing. ... In medicine, hyperventilation (or hyperpnea) is the state of breathing faster or deeper (hyper) than necessary, and thereby reducing the carbon dioxide concentration of the blood below normal. ... Mouth breathing refers to the state of inhaling and exhaling through the mouth. ... For information on Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography, see Chromatography. ... Bradypnea refers to an abnormally slow breathing rate. ... In medicine, hypoventilation (also known as respiratory depression) occurs when ventilation is inadequate (hypo means below) to perform needed gas exchange. ... In medicine, chest pain is a symptom of a number of conditions and is generally considered a medical emergency, unless the patient is a known angina pectoris sufferer and the symptoms are familiar (appearing at exertion and resolving at rest, known as stable angina). When the chest pain is not... Suffocation redirects here, for the band, see Suffocation (band). ... Pleurisy, also known as pleuritis, is an inflammation of the pleura, the lining of the pleural cavity surrounding the lungs, which can cause painful respiration (also called pleuritic chest pain) and other symptoms. ... Respiratory arrest is the cessation of the normal tidal flow of the lungs due to paralysis of the diaphragm, collapse of the lung or any number of respiratory failures. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bruit is the term for the unusal sound that blood makes when it rushes past an obstruction in an artery when the sound is observed with a stethoscope. ... A carotid bruit is a bruit or sound heard over the carotid artery area, usually by a nurse or physician during auscultation. ... Rales,crackles or crepitation, are the clicking, rattling, or crackling noises heard on auscultation of the lungs with a stethescope during inhalation. ... what was here was sick and improperly spelled. ... The human abdomen (from the Latin word meaning belly) is the part of the body between the pelvis and the thorax. ... Abdominal pain can be one of the symptoms associated with transient disorders or serious disease. ... The term acute abdomen refers to a sudden, severe pain in the abdomen that is less than 24 hours in duration. ... For other uses, see Nausea (disambiguation). ... Emesis redirects here. ... Dysphagia () is a medical term defined as difficulty swallowing. ... Flatulence is the presence of a mixture of gases known as flatus in the digestive tract of mammals expelled from the rectum. ... Abdominal distension (or Distended abdomen) can be a sign of many other conditions, including: diverticulitis lactose intolerance obstructed bowel premenstrual syndrome pregnancy weight gain See also Gastric distension Bloating External links University of Maryland MedlinePlus/NIH Category: ... Bloating is any abnormal general swelling, or increase in diameter of the abdominal area. ... Burping, also known as belching, ructus, or eructation involves the release of gas from the digestive tract (mainly esophagus and stomach) through the mouth. ... This article is about the medical condition. ... Fecal incontinence is the loss of regular control of the bowels. ... Encopresis is involuntary fecal soiling in children who have usually already been toilet trained. ... Hepatosplenomegaly is the simultaneous enlargement of both the liver (hepatomegaly) and the spleen (splenomegaly). ... Hepatomegaly is the condition of having an enlarged liver. ... Splenomegaly is an enlargement of the spleen, which usually lies in the left upper quadrant (LUQ) of the human abdomen. ... Look up jaundice in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Fecal occult blood is a term for blood present in the feces that is not visibly apparent. ... Halitosis, oral malodor (scientific term), breath odor, foul breath, fetor oris, fetor ex ore, or most commonly bad breath are terms used to describe noticeably unpleasant odors exhaled in breathing – whether the smell is from an oral source or not. ... For other uses, see Skin (disambiguation). ... The subcutis is the layer of tissue directly underlying the cutis. ... Hypoesthesia refers to a reduced sense of touch or sensation, or a partial loss of sensitivity to sensory stimuli. ... Paresthesia or paraesthesia (in British English) is a sensation of tingling, pricking, or numbness of a persons skin with no apparent long-term physical effect, more generally known as the feeling of pins and needles or of a limb being asleep (but not directly related to the phenomenon of... Hyperesthesia (or Hyperaesthesia) is a condition that involves an abnormal increase in sensitivity to stimuli of the senses. ... A rash is a change in skin which affects its color, appearance, or texture. ... Cyanosis refers to the bluish coloration of the skin due to the presence of deoxygenated hemoglobin in blood vessels near the skin surface. ... Pallor is a reduced amount of oxyhemoglobin in skin or mucous membrane, a pale color which can be caused by illness, emotional shock or stress, avoiding excessive exposure to sunlight, anaemia or genetics. ... For a person to flush is to become markedly red in the face and often other areas of the skin, from various physiological conditions. ... minor Petechia A petechia (IPA pronunciation: ), plural petechiae (IPA pronunciation: ) is a small red or purple spot on the body, caused by a minor hemorrhage (broken capillary blood vessels). ... Desquamation is the shedding of the outer layers of the skin. ... Induration (indoo rāshən, -dyoo-), a noun, means, in terms of pathology, (a) hardening of an area of the body as a reaction to inflammation, hyperemia, or neoplastic infiltration, or (b) an area or part of the body that has undergone such a reaction. ... Diaphoresis is excessive sweating commonly associated with shock and other medical emergency conditions. ... The nervous system is a highly specialized network whose principal components are cells called neurons. ... The musculoskeletal system (also known as the locomotor system) is an organ system that gives animals the ability to physically move using the muscles and skeletal system. ... For the film see Tremors (film). ... A spasm is a sudden, involuntary contraction of a muscle, a group of muscles, or a hollow organ, or a similarly sudden contraction of an orifice. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Twitching. ... Athetosis is a continuous stream of slow, sinuous, writhing movements, typically of the hands and feet. ... Persons suffering from peripheral neuropathy experience numbness and tingling in their hands and feet. ... For other uses, see Ataxia (disambiguation). ... Dysmetria (Greek: dificult to measure) is a symptom exhibited by patients after cerebellar injury. ... Dysdiadochokinesia is the medical term for an inability to perform rapid, alternating movements. ... Hypotonia is a condition of abnormally low muscle tone (the amount of tension or resistance to movement in a muscle), often involving reduced muscle strength. ... Diseases and other conditions that increase action potential frequency cause unwanted contraction of muscles. ... Meningism is the triad of nuchal rigidity, photophobia (intolerance of bright light) and headache. ... Hyperreflexia is defined as overactive or overresponsive reflexes. ... The urinary system is the organ system that produces, stores, and eliminates urine. ... Renal colic is a type of pain commonly caused by kidney stones. ... In medicine, specifically urology, dysuria refers to any difficulty in urination. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Urinary retention also known as ischuria is a lack of ability to urinate. ... Oliguria and anuria are the decreased or absent production of urine, respectively. ... Polyuria is the passage of a large volume of urine in a given period. ... Nocturia is the need to get up during the night in order to urinate, thus interrupting sleep. ... Extravasation of urine refers to the condition where an interruption of the urethra leads to a collection of urine in other cavities, such as the scrotum. ... Uremia is a toxic condition resulting from renal failure, when kidney function is compromised and urea, a waste product normally excreted in the urine, is retained in the blood. ... Look up Cognition in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In psychology and the cognitive sciences, perception is the process of acquiring, interpreting, selecting, and organizing sensory information. ... In psychology and common terminology, emotion is the language of a persons internal state of being, normally based in or tied to their internal (physical) and external (social) sensory feeling. ... Behavior or behaviour refers to the actions or reactions of an object or organism, usually in relation to the environment. ... Anxiety is a physiological state characterized by cognitive, somatic, emotional, and behavioral components (Seligman, Walker & Rosenhan, 2001). ... Somnolence (or drowsiness) is a state of near-sleep, a strong desire for sleep, or sleeping for unusually long periods. ... For other uses, see Coma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Amnesia (disambiguation). ... Anterograde amnesia is a form of amnesia, or memory loss, in which new events are not transferred from short-term memory to long-term memory. ... Retrograde amnesia is a form of amnesia where someone will be unable to recall events that occurred before the onset of amnesia. ... For other uses, see Vertigo. ... Anosmia is the lack of olfaction, or a loss of the ability to smell. ... Ageusia (pronounced ay-GOO-see-uh) is the loss of taste functions of the tongue, particularly the inability to detect sweetness, sourness, bitterness, and saltiness. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Parageusia is the medical term for a bad taste in the mouth. ... Bold text This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The word voice can be used to refer to: Sound: The human voice. ... Speech disorders or speech impediments, as they are also called, are a type of communication disorders where normal speech is disrupted. ... Dysphasia should not be confused with the similarly pronounced dysphagia, which is a difficulty swallowing. ... For other uses, see Aphasia (disambiguation). ... Look up dysarthria in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about developmental dyslexia. ... Alexia (from the Greek , privative, expressing negation, and = word) is an acquired type of sensory aphasia where damage to the brain causes a patient to lose the ability to read. ... Agnosia (a-gnosis, non-knowledge, or loss of knowledge) is a loss of ability to recognize objects, persons, sounds, shapes, or smells while the specific sense is not defective nor is there any significant memory loss[1][2]. It is usually associated with brain injury or neurological illness, particularly after... Apraxia is a neurological disorder characterized by loss of the ability to execute or carry out learned (familiar) movements, despite having the desire and the physical ability to perform the movements. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Dysgraphia (or agraphia) is a deficiency in the ability to write, regardless of the ability to read, not due to intellectual impairment. ... Speech disorders or speech impediments, as they are also called, are a type of communication disorders where normal speech is disrupted. ... Lisp may mean: Lisp programming language Lisp (speech) This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Aphasia is a loss or impairment of the ability to produce or comprehend language, due to brain damage. ... The term symptom (from the Greek meaning chance, mishap or casualty, itself derived from συμπιπτω meaning to fall upon or to happen to) has two similar meanings in the context of physical and mental health: Strictly, a symptom is a sensation or change in health function experienced by a patient. ... In medicine, a sign is a feature of disease as detected by the doctor during physical examination of a patient. ... An analogue medical thermometer showing the temperature of 38. ... In medicine, hyperpyrexia is an excessive and unusual elevation of body temperature above 107. ... A headache (cephalgia in medical terminology) is a condition of pain in the head; sometimes neck or upper back pain may also be interpreted as a headache. ... Chronic pain was originally defined as pain that has lasted 6 months or longer. ... Malaise is a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness, an out of sorts feeling, often the first indication of an infection or other disease. ... Exhaustion redirects here. ... Asthenia (Greek: ασθένεια, lit. ... It has been suggested that Central Ischaemic Response be merged into this article or section. ... Vasovagal syncope is the most common cause of syncope, also known as fainting. ... A febrile seizure, also known as a fever fit or febrile convulsion is a generalized convulsion caused by elevated body temperature. ... This article is about the medical condition. ... Cardiogenic shock is based upon an inadequate circulation of blood due to primary failure of the ventricles of the heart to function effectively. ... Lymphadenopathy is a term meaning disease of the lymph nodes. ... This page is about the condition called edema. ... Peripheral edema ... Anasarca is a medical symptom characterised by widespread swelling of the skin due to effusion of fluid into the extracellular space. ... Primary hyperhidrosis is the condition characterized by abnormally increased perspiration, in excess of that required for regulation of body temperature. ... Sleep hyperhidrosis, more commonly known as the night sweats, is the occurrence of excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis) during sleep. ... The term Delayed milestone (or developmental delays) is used to describe the condition where a child does not reach one of these stages at the expected age. ... Failure to thrive is a medical term which denotes poor weight gain and physical growth failure over an extended period of time in infancy. ... People who are shorter have short stature. ... Idiopathic short stature (ISS) refers to extreme short stature that does not have a diagnostic explanation (idiopathic designates a condition that is unexplained or not understood) after an ordinary growth evaluation. ... Anorexia (deriving from the Greek α(ν)- (a(n)-, a prefix that denotes absence) + όρεξη (orexe) = appetite) is the decreased sensation of appetite. ... Polydipsia is a medical condition in which the patient ingests abnormally large amounts of fluids by mouth. ... Phagy or phagia is an ecological term that is used to identify particular nutritional systems. ... Xerostomia is the medical term for a dry mouth due to a lack of saliva. ... For other uses, see Clubbing (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Information on vestibular balance disorders (causing dizziness, vertigo, lightheadedness, or motion sickness) produced ... (958 words)
Dizziness is a general-purpose, rather imprecise term used to describe the sensation of imbalance (sensory disorientation).
Although patients often use the word dizziness to describe balance or inner ear problems, it is typically not caused by a disorder of the inner ear.
Whereas vertigo, lightheadedness, and dizziness are symptoms of diseases, motion sickness is a normal response to an abnormal situation.
Dizziness (356 words)
Dizziness relates to feeling lightheaded, feeling like you might faint, being unsteady or the loss of balance, while vertigo relates to feeling that you or the room is spinning or moving.
Dizziness, when not related to other illnesses, conditions or inner ear problems (for example, Meniere's disease or labyrinthitis), is commonly a sign of a neurological condition.
Dizziness related to multiple sclerosis is not usually a permanent event and it tends to pass over the course of several weeks.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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