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Encyclopedia > Dixie
Ten Dollar Note from Banque Des Citoyens of Louisiana, 1860
Ten Dollar Note from Banque Des Citoyens of Louisiana, 1860

Dixie is a nickname for the Southern United States. Dixie refers to several things: Areas in the United States named Dixie: Dixie is a nickname for the southeastern United States Dixie is a southern region in the state of Utah Little Dixie is a southern region in the state of Oklahoma Little Dixie is a region of the state... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Historic Southern United States. ...

Contents

Origin of Dixie

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the origins of this nickname remain obscure. According to A Dictionary of Americanisms on Historical Principles (1951), by Mitford M. Mathews, three theories most commonly attempt to explain the term: The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. The word "Dixie" refers to a privately issued currency from banks in Louisiana[1]. These banks issued ten-dollar notes, labeled "Dix" (French for "ten") on the reverse side. These notes are now highly sought-after for their numismatic value. The notes were known as "Dixies" by English-speaking southerners, and the area around New Orleans and the Cajun-speaking parts of Louisiana came to be known as "Dixieland". Eventually, usage of the term broadened to refer to most of the Southern States.
  2. The word preserves the name of a kind slave owner on Manhattan Island, a Mr. Dixy. (Slavery was legal in New York until 1827.) His rule was so kindly that "Dixy's Land" became famed far and wide as an Elysium abounding in material comforts.
  3. "Dixie" derives from Jeremiah Dixon of the Mason-Dixon line defining the boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania (the northern boundary of Dixie).

The Mason-Dixon theory is the most popularly known, but few lexicographers give it much weight[citation needed]. For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Numismatics (ancient Greek: νομισματική) is the scientific study of money and its history in all its varied forms. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Cajun French (sometimes called Louisiana Regional French [2]) is one of three varieties or dialects of the French language spoken primarily in the U.S. state of Louisiana, specifically in the southern parishes. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Slave redirects here. ... This article is about the state. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jeremiah Dixon (July 27, 1733 – January 22, 1779) was an English surveyor and astronomer who is perhaps best known for his work with Charles Mason, from 1763 to 1767, in determining what was later called the Mason-Dixon line. ... For the fictional character, see Mason Dixon (Rocky Balboa character). ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ...


I Wish I Was in Dixie

Main article: "Dixie (song)"
"I Wish I Was in Dixie's Land" Sheet music
"I Wish I Was in Dixie's Land" Sheet music

"I Wish I Was in Dixie" is a popular song about the South. It was written by composer Daniel Emmett, a Northerner, and published in 1859. A blackface minstrel-show troupe debuted the song that same year in New York City. As with other minstrel show numbers, the song was performed in blackface and in exaggerated Black English Vernacular. The song proved extremely popular and became widely known simply as "Dixie". The song has also been published as "Dixie's Land". Sheet music cover, c. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1881x645, 183 KB) Summary Sheet music for Dixies Land. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1881x645, 183 KB) Summary Sheet music for Dixies Land. ... Daniel Decatur Dan Emmett (1815-1904), was born at Mount Vernon, Ohio. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. ... Detail from cover of The Celebrated Negro Melodies, as Sung by the Virginia Minstrels, 1843 The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, was an American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, performed by white people in blackface or, especially after the American Civil War, African Americans in blackface. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... African-American Vernacular English (AAVE), also called Ebonics, Black English, or Black English Vernacular (BEV) is a dialect of American English. ...


The song became the unofficial anthem of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. This and the tune's minstrel-show origins have created a strong association of "Dixie" with the Old South. As a result, some today view the song as offensive and racist. Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Geographically, Old South is a subregion of the American South, differentiated from the Deep South as being the Southern States represented in the original thirteen American colonies, as well as a way of describing the former lifestyle in the Southern United States. ...

"Dixie"
1916 rendition of Dixie by the Metropolitan Mixed Chorus with Ada Jones and Billy Murray
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Image File history File links Dixie_(1916). ... Ada Jones (June 1, 1873 – May 22, 1922) was a popular singer whose recordings ranged from 1905 to the early 1920s. ... Billy Murray (25 May 1877 - 17 August 1954) was one of the most popular singers in the United States in the early decades of the 20th century. ...

Dixie as a region

As a definite geographic location within the United States, "Dixie" is usually defined as the 11 Southern states which seceded to form the Confederate States of America. They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. This definition is strongly correlated with history and, in the minds of many Southerners, remains the traditional and emotional South. Historic Southern United States. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest City = Charlotte Largest city {{{LargestCity}}} Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... A person originating from or residing in the geographical south of a country. ...


In other ways however, the "location" and boundaries of Dixie has become, over time, more limited, vernacular, and/or mercurial. In popular mindset today, it is most often associated with those parts of the Southern United States where Old South traditions and legacies of the Confederacy live most strongly, and are most widely celebrated and remembered. Or where the image of "moonlight and magnolias" is very rooted in reality. Geographically, Old South is a subregion of the American South, differentiated from the Deep South as being the Southern States represented in the original thirteen American colonies, as well as a way of describing the former lifestyle in the Southern United States. ...


In this particular contemporary realm, there are no hard and fast lines. Roughly however, it might be an area which begins in southern Virginia and extends south into the Florida panhandle. On the northern boundary it sweeps west to take in Tennessee (and perhaps the southern parts of Kentucky), then westward through a good part of Arkansas. On the southern end it would run through the Gulf states until the northern and southern boundary lines connect to include and take in East Texas. The Florida Panhandle is the region of the state of Florida which includes the westernmost 16 counties in the state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Red counties show the core of East Texas; pink and red counties may or may not be included in East Texas, and thus their inclusion varies from source to source. ...


Many businesses in the South contain "Dixie" in their name as an identifier, e.g. "Dixie Produce." One of the more famous is supermarket chain Winn-Dixie. Related to this fact, renowned cultural sociologist and "Southernologist" Dr. John Shelton Reed has attempted to "locate" Dixie by a criterion measuring the ratio of business listings containing the term as compared to those utilizing "American." First published in a 1976 article in Social Forces, this particular study was later updated in 1988. In contrasting the two, the delineating lines measuring over 6% of Dixie to American remained fairly constant in covering the Old Confederate States, with the exception being in Texas where, in both surveys, it was fairly well limited to eastern parts of the state. Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Social Forces (formerly Journal of Social Forces) is a social science academic journal published by University of North Carolina Press. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


Noted anomalies were the inclusion, and later even slight extension, into parts of the lower Midwest, particularly southern Indiana and southwestern Ohio. Neither of these areas can be properly considered a part of the South, so one explanation could be the extent of the so-called "Dixie Highway" into those particular locales and business names reflecting such. Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Dixie Highway in St. ...


In using a yardstick of 15%, all but a tiny slice of northeast Texas drops out of the picture. Also losing considerable ground were Virginia and most of Florida save the panhandle. Notable losses also occurred in North Carolina and Kentucky. Most remarkable of all however, was, as Reed stated, the fact that Dixie "dissolves as a coherent region" when the even more demanding standard of 25% was applied. In 1988 as compared to 1976, with the exception of small and isolated parts of adjoining states, only in Mississippi, Georgia, and South Carolina were large areas still recorded on the data map.


The first 12 notes of Dixie are the opener on The Dukes Of Hazzard. Also, they are the horn of The General Lee.


See also

Dixieland music is a style of jazz. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Black Belt Region in the U.S. refers to the social and demographic crescent of 623 southern counties that contain a higher than average percentages of African American residents. ... The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red The Bible Belt is an informal term for an area of the United States of America in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a dominant part of the culture. ... For the fictional character, see Mason Dixon (Rocky Balboa character). ... Dixie Dregs is a progressive rock band formed in the 1970s. ...

Songs

Jake Owen, born Josh Owen, is an American country music singer-songwriter. ... Dixie Lullaby is a song from United States country music singer-songwriter Pat Green. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

References

  • John Shelton Reed (with J. Kohl and C. Hanchette) (1990). The Shrinking South and the Dissolution of Dixie. Social Forces, 69 (September 1990): 221-233. 

Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The All-Inclusive Dixie Chicks Page (1174 words)
Long before then, the Dixie Chicks were local favorites in their home base of Dallas, Texas, working the honky tonk and high school cafeteria circuit.
They call themselves the "Dixie Chicks", a delightfully whimsical name to match their frilly cowgirl look, but their music is the real thing.
The All-Inclusive Dixie Chicks Page is proud to host the mirror sites for several now-defunct web sites, as a way to preserve the history of the group, and of the musical scene it came from and continues to shape.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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