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Encyclopedia > Division II

Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. It offers an alternative to both the highly competitive (and highly expensive) "big-time" level of intercollegiate sports offered in NCAA Division I and the non-scholarship, largely recreational level of competition offered in Division III. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Division III consists of institutions who recognize that collegiate athletics can be an integral part of the educational process. ...


Division II schools tend to be smaller public universities and many private institutions. Athletic scholarships are offered in most sponsored sports at most institutions, but with more stringent limits as to the numbers offered in any one sport than at the Division I level. Division II scholarship programs are frequently the recipients of student-athletes transferring from Division I schools; a transfer student does not have to sit out a year before resuming sports participation as would be the case in the event of transferring from one Division I institution to another.


Many Division II schools frequently schedule matches against members of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, which is something of a rival collegiate sports sanctioning authority to the NCAA which specializes primarily in smaller institutions. Division II schools also frequently schedule "money games", usually men's basketball games, against Division I schools, particularly lesser-known ones, early in the season in which they are almost invariably the visiting team and are invited to play with the almost-certain knowledge that they will be defeated but will receive a substantial (at least by Division II standards) monetary reward which will help to finance much of the rest of the season and perhaps other sports as well. Matches between Division I and Division II schools in non-revenue sports are often quite competitive; the difference in the level of competition between the two divisions is often considerably less in these sports than it is in football and men's basketball. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


The viability of Division II as an ongoing operation in the medium-to-long term is frequently called into question; it is noted that these institution's athletics programs share many of the major expenses of their Division I counterparts with regard especially to scholarships, facilities upkeep, and travel while receiving for the most part far smaller gate receipts and almost no television revenue. An increasing number of Division II schools are under pressure from administrators, boosters, and other interested parties either to "step up" to Division I or down to Division III; as a result, the NCAA has adopted rules which tend to make it harder for new institutions to join Division I, such as minimum attendance requirements for football and a long waiting period (now eight years) before a new Division I institution can participate in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament ("March Madness") or share in its considerable revenues. The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Division II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (317 words)
Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association.
Many Division II schools frequently schedule matches against members of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, which is something of a rival collegiate sports sanctioning authority to the NCAA which specializes primarily in smaller institutions.
Division II schools in non-revenue sports are often quite competitive; the difference in the level of competition between the two divisions is often considerably less in these sports than it is in football and men's basketball.
Division II Deregulation Package (5171 words)
Division II coaching salaries are, in most cases, not comparable to those in Division I and very often necessitate coaches securing outside employment during the summer when they are normally not under contract to the institution (i.e., Division II coaching contracts are not normally twelve-month contracts).
In Division II football, one telephone call to a prospect [or the prospect’s relatives or legal guardian(s)] may be made during the month of May of the prospect’s junior year in high school.
In Division II basketball, evaluation of contests in the state high-school basketball tournament that occurs within the state in which the member institution is located shall not count as an evaluation for any of the participating prospects.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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