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Encyclopedia > Division (military)
Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code
Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code

A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. In most armies, a division is composed of several regiments or brigades, and in turn several divisions make up a corps. In most modern militaries, a division tends to be the largest combined arms unit capable of independent operations; due to its self-sustaining role as a unit with a range of combat troops and suitable combat support forces, which can be divided into various organic combinations. Image File history File links Dywizja_wiki. ... Image File history File links Dywizja_wiki. ... Symbol of the division in modern NATO code Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division () was a tactical unit of the Polish Army between the World Wars. ... Military Symbols for Land Based Systems APP-6A is the NATO standard for military map marking symbols. ... A military unit is an organisation within an armed force. ... A formation is a high-level military organization, such as a Brigade, Division, Corps, Army or Army group. ... A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - - commanded by a colonel. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... A corps (a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: , but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body; plural same as singular) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or signals... Modern warfare involves the widespread use of highly advanced technology. ... Combined arms is an approach to warfare which seeks to integrate different arms of a military to achieve mutually complementary effects. ... Military tactics (Greek: Taktikē, the art of organizing an army) is the collective name for methods of engaging and defeating an enemy in battle. ... Military doctrine is a level of military planning between national strategy and unit-level tactics, techniques, and procedures. ... Combate Naval de Iquique - oil on canvas painting by Thomas Somerscales, XIX century Combat, or fighting, is purposeful violent conflict between one or more persons or organizations, often intended to establish dominance over the opposition. ... In military terminology, organic refers to a military unit of one type within a larger unit predominantly of a different type. ...

Contents

History

Origins

The first one to think of organising an army into smaller combined-arms units was Maurice de Saxe, Marshal General of France, in his book Mes Réveries. Because of his early death in 1750, it remained just an idea for the time being. Maurice de Saxe, Marshal General of France, in 1748 Maurice, comte de Saxe (German Moritz Graf von Sachsen) (28 October 1696 – 20 November 1750), Marshal of France and later also Marshal General of France. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex...


It was another French military leader who put the ideas into practice, Victor-François de Broglie. He conducted practical experiments in the Seven Year’s War, and even though the war was not a success for the French, the divisional system was. Victor-François, 2nd duc de Broglie (19 October 1718–30 March 1804) was a French aristocrat and soldier and a marshal of France. ...


Early Divisions

The first war that the divisional system was employed in was the French revolutionary war. The revolutionary government came to the same conclusion about it as the previous royal government and the army was organised into divisions.


It made the armies more flexible and easy to manoeuvre, and it also made the large army of the revolution manageable. Under Napoleon the divisions were grouped together into corps, because of their increasing size. Napoleons' military success spread the divisional and corps system all over Europe. When the Napoleonic Wars ended, all armies in Europe had adopted it. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... A corps (a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: , but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body; plural same as singular) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or signals... World map exhibiting the location of Europe. ... Combatants Allies: Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Spain[3] Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[5] Saxony[6] Denmark [7] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von Blücher Duke of Brunswick Prince...


The Modern Division

In modern times, the divisional structure has been standardized by most military forces. This does not mean that divisions are equal in size or structure from military to military, but generally divisions have in most cases come to be units of 10,000 to 20,000 troops with substantial enough support organic to the unit to be capable of independent operations. Usually the direct organization of the division consists of one to four brigades or regiments of the combat arm of the division along with a brigade or regiment of combat support (usually artillery) and a number of direct-reporting battalions for various specialized support tasks (often reconnaissance and combat engineers). In most militaries, ideal organization strength is standardized for each type of division, encapsulated in a Table of Organization and Equipment, or TO&E, which specifies exact assignments of units, personnel, and equipment for the division. Historically, artillery (from French artillerie) refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... ... A table of organization and equipment (TOE) is a document published by the U.S. Department of Defense which prescribes the organization, manning, and equippage of units from divisional size and down, but also including the headquarters of Corps and Armies. ...


The modern division has become in many militaries the primary identifiable combat unit, supplanting the regiment. The peak of use of the division as the primary combat unit was during World War II, when hundreds of divisions were deployed. Presently, smaller numbers of divisions represent significant combat power. The recent Invasion of Iraq was completed with only a handful of divisions with significant support forces. Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom South Korea Australia Poland Romania others. ...


Types

Divisions are often formed to organize units of a particular type together with appropriate support units to allow independent operations. In more recent times, divisions are more often organized as a combined arms unit with subordinate units representing various combat arms. In this case, the division often retains the name of a more specialized division, and may still be tasked with a primary role suited to that specialization. Combined arms is an approach to warfare which seeks to integrate different arms of a military to achieve mutually complementary effects. ... A hierarchy (in Greek hieros = sacred, arkho = rule) is a system of ranking and organizing things. ...


Infantry

The most common form of divisions formed throughout most of history have been infantry divisions. Often, in small militaries, all divisions were infantry and therefore the term division is synonymous with infantry division in those forces. The basic infantry division is usually formed with a number of infantry regiments (usually three), an artillery regiment, and a few support battalions. Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ...


Infantry divisions are often formed for specific purposes, and these are sometimes reflected in their name. Basic infantry, without its own transportation (thus relying on leg and horse mobility), is in modern times often considered light infantry, thus the formation of the light infantry division. Its primary value in today's military environment is that it is easy to transport and keep supplied due to its lack of heavy equipment. It is ideal for low-intensity conflict, but lacks firepower for full scale warfare. Low intensity conflict (LIC) is an armed conflict, usually between a regular army or law enforcement and non-regular armed militias (terror organization, guerrilla fighters, gangs, rioters etc). ...


Another kind of infantry division is mountain infantry. These units are designed to move and fight in alpine environments, and thus their training and equipment must be able to withstand rugged terrain and inclement conditions. Mountain units are often considered elite units, and they may be used in more conventional environments when high-quality troops are needed. Another popular elite infantry formation is the airborne infantry, commonly called parachute infantry (or paratroopers). These units are designed to drop their forces by air (both parachute and glider) and maintain combat operations autonomously behind enemy lines. More so than mountain divisions, these units require special training and equipment. A recent off-shoot has been the air-mobile infantry, designed to use helicopter insertion versus traditional airborne operations. All of these units are often employed as elite infantry in traditional combat situations. Look up elite, élite in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


During World War II, infantry units began becoming more and more mechanized. Many were given enough trucks to carry their entire force, sometimes becoming known as motorized infantry. Some were equipped with halftracks and other armored carriers, and were known as armored infantry (Germany's units were given the name Panzergrenadier). As these units were developed after the war, the term motorized became common regardless of the type of transportation. For example, the Soviet Union made wide use of armored personnel carriers in its motor rifle divisions, as did the United States Army in its infantry (motorized) divisions. East German BRDMs on parade during celebrations of the 40th anniversary of East Germany in 1989 Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are light armoured fighting vehicles for the transport of infantry. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the United States armed forces and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ...


Today, one of the most common kinds of infantry divisions are mechanized infantry divisions. Essentially an evolution of the motorized infantry division, mechanized infantry divisions contain infantry soldiers transported in armored personnel carriers and infantry fighting vehicles, backed up with heavy fire and striking power provided by tanks, helicopters, and artillery. In the US Army, three out of the eight active infantry divisions (the 1st, 3rd, and 4th) are mechanized, and another, the 2nd, has a mixture of mechanized and non-mechanized forces. East German BRDMs on parade during celebrations of the 40th anniversary of East Germany in 1989 Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are light armoured fighting vehicles for the transport of infantry. ... A Warrior vehicle with UN markings, during the making of the eponymous film. ... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more large horizontal rotors (propellers). ... Historically, artillery (from French artillerie) refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ...


Cavalry

For most nations, cavalry was deployed in smaller units and was not therefore organized into divisions, but for larger militaries, such as that of the United States, First French Empire, Russian Empire, and Soviet Union, a number of cavalry divisions were formed. They were most often similar to the nations' infantry divisions in structure, although they usually had fewer and lighter support elements, with cavalry brigades or regiments replacing the infantry units, and supporting units such as artillery and supply being horse-drawn. For the most part, large cavalry units did not remain after World War II. Soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat are commonly known as cavalry (from French cavalerie). ... The First French Empire, commonly known as the French Empire or the Napoleonic Empire, covers the period of the domination of France and much of continental Europe by Napoleon I of France. ... Anthem: God Save the Tsar! Russian Empire in 1914 Capital Saint Petersburg Language(s) Russian Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1721-1725 Peter the Great  - 1894-1917 Nicholas II History  - Established 22 October, 1721  - February Revolution 2 March, 1917 Area  - 1897 22,400,000 km2 8,648,688 sq mi Population  - 1897... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict...


While horse cavalry had been found to be obsolete, the concept of cavalry as a fast force capable of missions traditionally fulfilled by horse cavalry made a return to military thinking during the Cold War. In general, two new types of cavalry were developed: air cavalry or airmobile, relying on helicopter mobility, and armored cavalry, based on an autonomous armored formation. The former was pioneered by the U.S. 11th Airborne Division, under the name 11th Air Assault Division, and was reflagged as the 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) during the Vietnam War. A US Army UH-1 Huey seen offloading troops during the Vietnam War Air Assault (or air mobile, in the U.S. Air Cavalry) is the movement of forces by helicopter or aircraft to engage and destroy enemy forces or to seize and hold key terrain. ... Shoulder sleeve patch of the 11th Airborne Division. ... The 1st Cavalry Division (1st Cav Div) is a heavy armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Fort Hood, Texas. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


After the end of the Vietnam War, the 1st Cavalry Division was reorganised and re-equipped with tanks and armored scout vehicles to form armored cavalry, as were all of the United States' independent Cavalry Regiments.


After the 1990-91 Gulf War, the U.S. 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment (2nd ACR) was re-equipped with Humvees and designated Armored Cavalry (Light), while units retaining their Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting Vehicles were classified as Armored Cavalry (Heavy). In 2004 the 2nd ACR was again reequipped, this time with Stryker Armored Combat Vehicles, and renamed the 2nd Cavalry Regiment. {{Infobox Military Unit |unit_name=2nd Cavalry Regiment |image= |caption=2nd CR Coat Of Arms |dates=May 23, 1836-Present. ... This article refers to the Military HMMWV, not the civilian Hummer sold by General Motors The M998 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV or Humvee) is a military motor vehicle created by AM General. ... The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army and the United States Marine Corps, with three main versions being deployed starting in 1980: the M1, M1A1, and M1A2. ... The M2 Bradley IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle) and M3 Bradley CFV (Cavalry Fighting Vehicle) are American infantry fighting vehicles manufactured by BAE Systems Land and Armaments, (formerly United Defense, originally FMC). ... The Stryker is a family of eight-wheeled all wheel drive (AWD) armored combat vehicles (ACVs) produced by General Dynamics Land Systems, in current use by the US Army. ...


Armoured divisions

The development of the tank near the end of World War I prompted some nations to experiment with forming them into division-size units. Many did this the same way as they did cavalry, by merely replacing infantry with tank units and giving motorization to the support units. This proved unwieldy in combat, as the units had many tanks but few infantry units. Instead, a more balanced approach of balancing the number of tank, infantry, and artillery units within the division took place. Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz...


By the end of World War II, in most cases armoured division referred to divisions with significant tank battalions and motorization for its infantry, artillery, and support units. Infantry division referred to divisions with a majority of infantry units.


Since the end of the war, most armoured and infantry divisions have had significant numbers of both tank and infantry units within them. The difference has usually been in the mix of battalions assigned. Additionally, in some militaries, armoured divisions would be equipped with the most advanced or powerful tanks - such as the M1A2 Abrams in the United States.


Nomenclature

In most nations, divisions are designated by combining an ordinal number and a type name. Nicknames are often assigned or adopted although these often are not considered an official part of the unit's nomenclature. In some cases, divisions are titled without an ordinal number, often in the case of unique units, or units serving as elite or special troops. For clarification in histories and reports, the nation is identified previous to the number. Commonly, ordinal numbers, or ordinals for short, are numbers used to denote the position in an ordered sequence: first, second, third, fourth, etc. ...


It is important to note that division names are completely subject to the whim of whatever controlling body names the unit. Fanciful and incongruous names are commonly found. It is common for the ordinal number to not be sequential, leading to high numbers without that many divisions existing. Types as well are not always indicative of the actual structure or mission of the unit. Germany raised a parachute armoured division (Fallschirmpanzer-Division) during World War II which obviously never conducted, nor was intended to conduct, a parachute drop.


The primary purpose of nomenclature is to give each unit a unique identification to assist in command and control of units. This is also helpful in historical studies, but due to the nature of intelligence on the battlefield, division names and assignments are at times obscured. However, the size of the division makes such obfuscation rarely necessary.


National organization

Canada

The first division sized formation raised by the Canadian military was the First Contingent of the Canadian Expeditionary Force; raised in 1914, it was renamed the Canadian Division in early 1915 when it took to the field, and became the 1st Canadian Division when a 2nd Canadian Division took to the field later that year. A 3rd Canadian Division and 5th Canadian Division saw service in France and Flanders, and a Fifth Canadian Division was disbanded in the United Kingdom and broken up for reinforcements. The four divisions (collectively under the command of the Canadian Corps) were disbanded in 1919. The Canadian Corps - 1st Canadian Division – World War I Formed in August of 1914, the 1st Canadian Division was initially made up from Provisional Battalions that were named after their Province of origin but these Provisional titles were dropped before the Division arrived in Britain on October 14, 1914. ... The Canadian Corps - 2nd Canadian Division – World War I The formation of the 2nd Canadian Division began in May of 1915 in France in September of 1915. ... The Canadian Corps - 3rd Canadian Division – World War I The 3rd Canadian Division was formed in France in December of 1915 under the command of Major-General M.S. Mercer. ... The Canadian Corps - 5th Canadian Division – World War I The 5th Canadian Division began assembling in Britain in February, 1917, but was broken up in February of 1918 before it was fully formed. ...


Canada had nominal divisions on paper between the wars, overseeing the Militia (part time reserve forces), but no active duty divisions. On 1 September 1939, two divisions were raised as part of the Canadian Active Service Force; a Third Division was raised in 1940, followed by a First Canadian (Armoured) Division and Fourth Canadian Division. The First Armoured was renamed the Fifth Canadian (Armoured) Division and the Fourth Division also became an armoured formation. The 1st and 5th Divisions fought in the Mediterranean between 1943 and early 1945; the 2nd, 4th and 5th Divisions served in Northwest Europe. A Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Division were raised for service in Canada, with one brigade of the Sixth Division going to Kiska in 1943. By 1945, the latter three divisions were disbanded as the threat to North America diminished. A Third Canadian Division (Canadian Army Occupation Force) was raised in 1945 for occupation duty in Germany, organized parallel to the combatant Third Division, and a Sixth Canadian Division (Canadian Army Pacific Force) was undergoing formation and training for the invasion of Japan when the latter country surrendered in September 1945. All five combatant divisions, as well as the CAOF and CAPF were disbanded by the end of 1946.


A First Canadian Division Headquarters (later renamed simply First Division) was authorized once again in April 1946, but remained dormant until formally disbanded in July 1954. Simultaneously, however, another "Headquarters, First Canadian Infantry Division" was authorized as part of the Canadian Army Active Force (the Regular forces of the Canadian military), in October 1953. This, the first peace-time Division in Canadian history, consisted of a brigade in Germany, one in Edmonton and one at Valcartier. This Division was disbanded in April 1958.


The First Canadian Division was reactivated one last time in 1988, but is no longer on the official order of battle. Canada currently has no active duty divisions.


United Kingdom

In the British Army a division is commanded by a major-general and consists of three infantry, mechanised and/or armoured brigades and supporting units. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ...


Currently, the British Army has five active divisions:

The British 1st Armoured Division is the title of an armoured division of the British Army. ... The British 2nd Infantry Division has seen much service including fighting in Burma against the Japanese during World War II. See British 2nd Division (World War I) for the divisions World War I history. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... The British 3rd Infantry Division was part of the ill-fated British Expeditionary Force evacuated from Dunkirk early in World War II. It was the first British division to land at Sword beach on D-Day. ... Tidworth is a town in south-east Wiltshire, England with a growing civilian population. ... The British 4th Infantry Division served during World War II in France in 1940, North Africa and Italy. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The British 5th Infantry Division was a World War II infantry division. ... Statistics Population: 70,059 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SJ495123 Administration District: Shrewsbury and Atcham Shire county: Shropshire Region: West Midlands Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Shropshire Historic county: Shropshire Services Police force: West Mercia Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: West Midlands Post office and...

Germany

The German Army has today five active divisions: Army The German Army (German: Heer  ) is the land component of the Bundeswehr (Federal Defence Forces) of the Federal Republic of Germany. ...

1. Panzerdivision includes the main part of the rapid reaction forces. DSO is specialized in airborne and commando operations, DLO covers army aviation, airmobile forces and combat support troops. 10. Panzerdivision and 13. Panzergrenadierdivision are planned for peace keeping missions. Map of Germany showing Hanover Hanover (in German: Hannover [haˈnoːfɐ]), on the river Leine, is the capital of the state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... Veitshöchheim is a municipality in the district of Würzburg, in Bavaria, Germany. ... Coat of arms of Airmobile Operations Division The Airmobile Operations Division (Division Luftbewegliche Operationen) is a division of the German Army. ... Stadtallendorf is a town in Marburg-Biedenkopf district in Hesse, Germany, which lies about 18 km east of Marburg. ... Sigmaringen is a city in southern Germany, in the state of Baden-Württemberg, formerly Hohenzollern, capital of the Sigmaringen district. ... [] (Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the Federal State (Bundesland) of Saxony in Germany. ...


Each division is structured in 2-3 maneuver brigades. 1. PzDiv, DSO and DLO have division troops.


United States

In the United States Army, a divisional unit typically consists of 10,000 to 20,000 soldiers commanded by a major general. Two divisions usually compose a corps and each division is composed of four maneuver brigades, an aviation brigade, an engineer brigade, and division artillery, along with a number of smaller specialized units. The United States Army is the largest branch of the United States armed forces and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... A corps (a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: , but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body; plural same as singular) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or signals... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ...


The United States Army currently has ten active divisions:

The United States Marine Corps has a further three active divisions and one reserve division. They consist of three infantry regiments, one artillery regiment, a tank battalion, a Light Armored Reconnaissance battalion, an Amphibious Assault Vehicle battalion, a Reconnaissance battalion, a Combat Engineer battalion, and a Headquarters battalion. The 1st Infantry Division of the United States Army —nicknamed “The Big Red One” after its shoulder patch—is the oldest continuously serving division in the United States Army. ... Fort Riley is a census-designated place and United States Army post, in Northeast Kansas, on the Kansas River. ... Official language(s) none Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... The 1st Armored Division —nicknamed “Old Ironsides”— is an armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Wiesbaden, Germany. ... The 1st Cavalry Division (1st Cav Div) is a heavy armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Fort Hood, Texas. ... Fort Hood is a census-designated place and US Army post located outside of Killeen Texas. ... Official language(s) English (de facto) See also languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... The 2nd Infantry Division (Medium) is a formation of the United States Army. ... The 3d Infantry Division (Mechanized) —nicknamed the Rock of the Marne— is a United States Army infantry division based at Fort Stewart, Georgia. ... Fort Stewart is a census-designated place and U.S. Army post primarily located in Liberty County, Georgia, but also occupying significant portions of Bryan County, Georgia. ... It has been suggested that U.S. 1st Brigade 4th Infantry Division be merged into this article or section. ... The 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) is a light infantry division of the United States Army currently serving under the XVIII Airborne Corps. ... Fort Drum is a census-designated place and military reservation located in Jefferson County, New York. ... (Redirected from 25th Infantry Division) Patch of the United States Army 25th Infantry Division. ... A Army soldier practices with a M16A2 at Schofield Barracks Schofield Barracks is a United States Army installation (and census-designated place or CDP) located in the City & County of Honolulu and in the Wahiawa District of the island of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was constituted in the National Army as the 82nd Division on March 5, 1917, and was organized on March 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ... Fort Bragg is a census-designated place and a major United States Army fort, in Cumberland County, North Carolina, USA, near Fayetteville. ... The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)—nicknamed the “Screaming Eagles”—is an airborne division of the United States Army primarily trained for air assault operations. ... Fort Campbell is a United States Army installation located between Hopkinsville, Kentucky and Clarksville, Tennessee and is home to the 101st Airborne Division. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces to global crises. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ...

The 1st Marine Division is the oldest, largest (active duty), and most decorated division in the United States Marine Corps representing a combat-ready force of more than 19,000 men and women. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton is near Oceanside, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The U.S. 2nd Marine Division is a division of the United States Marine Corps, which forms the ground-force component of the II Marine Expeditionary Force. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune is near Jacksonville, North Carolina, on the Atlantic seaboard of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... The 3rd Marine Division is a division-sized unit in the United States Marine Corps based out of Okinawa, Japan. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler (usually Butler Marine Base in Okinawa) is a United States military Marine base located in the Japanese prefecture of Okinawa. ... This article is about the prefecture. ... The 4th Marine Division is a reserve infantry division of the United States Marine Corps. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W...

Russian Federation

There are two different types of units that match the English "division" term: дивизия (that is between regiment and army in size) and дивизион. The last one may be
  1. an artillery division as a set of batteries, or
  2. a ship division (корабельный дивизион, a specific service of a ship crew), or
  3. a division of ships (дивизион кораблей, set of ships).

The title Guard is the honor bestowed on units for heroism demonstrated in battles. The Guard was born on 18 September 1941 when divisions ## 100, 127, 153 were renamed into the First, the Second and the Third Guard Divisions respectively. In many cases the unit simultaneously received a name usually related to place of the heaviest battles for which it was honored, like Russian 4th Guards Kantemirovskaya Tank Division, Russian 2nd Guards Tamanskaya Motor Rifle Division and others. In military science, a battery is a unit of artillery guns or rockets, so grouped in order to facilitate battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion. ... Guards (Russian: гвардия) or Guards units (Russian: гвардейские части) were and are elite military units in Imperial Russia, Soviet Union and Russian Federation. ... The 4th Guards Kantemirovskaya Tank Division (Cyrillic: гвардейская танковая Кантемировская дивизия, Guards Tank Kantemirovskaya Division), more usually known as the Kantemirovskaya Division or Kantemir Division, is an elite armoured division of the Russian Army. ... The 2nd Guards Tamanskaya Motor Rifle Division, also known as the Tamanskaya Division, Taman Division and Taman Guards (Cyrillic: гвардейская мотострелковая Таманская дивизия, Guards Motor Rifle Tamanskaya Division), is one of the most famous divisions of the Russian Ground Forces. ...


During the Soviet era a motorized rifle division had 12,000 soldiers organized into three motorized rifle regiments, a tank regiment, an artillery regiment, an air defense regiment, surface-to-surface missile and antitank battalions, and supporting chemical, engineer, signal, reconnaissance, and rear services companies. A typical tank division had 10,000 soldiers organized into three tank regiments and one motorized rifle regiment. In 1989 the Ground Forces also included eight brigades of air assault, or air-mobile, units that conducted helicopter landing operations. Soviet redirects here. ...


Compared to Russian forces, US Army divisions have more infantry troops and larger logistic support, but fewer armored vehicles and artillery pieces. Russian forces are intended primarily for local regional operations and thus have fewer mobility assets and projection capabilities than possessed by the United States. The US military posture thus can deploy and operate at long distances, but the Russian military posture cannot do so to nearly such a degree. The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ...


In the early 1980s, out of a total of 194 active tank, motorized rifle and airborne divisions in the Soviet force, 65 were located in the western USSR, 30 in Eastern Europe and an additional 20 in the Transcaucasus and North Caucasus Military Districts (MDs). All these divisions were available for offensive operations against NATO. In addition to these forces, 17 low-strength divisions, centrally located in the USSR, constituted the Strategic Reserves. For operation in the Southern Theater the Soviets had in place six divisions in the Turkestan MD and four engaged in combat operations in Afghanistan. These forces could be reinforced by the 20 divisions from the Caucasus MDs if they were not engaged against NATO. Soviet forces for operations in the Far East were composed of 52 tank and motorized rifle divisions. The six Warsaw Pact Allies of the Soviet Union had a total of 55 active divisions, which, collectively with Soviet divisions, amounted to 249 combat divisions. Regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked salmon):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium... The Transcaucasus is a region covering the majority of Caucasus mountain range. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation[2] (NATO; French: ; also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance, the Western Alliance, or the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) is a military alliance established by the signing of the North Atlantic Treaty on 4 April 1949. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ...


Many of these divisions, most notably those in the interior of the USSR, were at low stages of readiness. The Soviets also maintained 17 mobilization bases, predominantly in the western USSR, that could form additional combat divisions. These bases usually contained the combat equipment needed to form new divisions and would require augmentation in manpower and a substantial amount of training before they could be committed to combat operations.


In 1989 the Soviet Union had 150 motorized rifle and 52 tank divisions in three states of readiness. The Ground Forces had sixty-five divisions, kept at between 50 and 75 percent of their projected wartime strengths, in the westernmost military districts of the Soviet Union; fifty-two divisions at less than half their wartime levels in the Siberian, Transbaykal, Central Asian, and Far East military districts along the border with China; and twenty-six low-readiness divisions in the Transcaucasus, North Caucasus, and Turkestan military districts. Siberian federal subjects of Russia Siberia (Russian: Сиби́рь, common English transliterations: Sibir, Sibir; possibly from the Mongolian for the calm land) is a vast region of Russia and northern Kazakhstan constituting all of northern Asia. ... Central Asia is a region of Asia. ... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ... The Transcaucasus is a region covering the majority of Caucasus mountain range. ... North Caucasus in Russia The North Caucasus (sometimes referred to as Ciscaucasia or Ciscaucasus) is the northern part of the Caucasus region between Europe and Asia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russian Tank and Motorized-Rifle Divisions were reduced to near-cadre state. A "cadre" division is equipped with all the heavy armaments of a full-strength motor-rifle or tank division, while having only skeleton personnel strength. The officers and men of a cadre division focus primarily on maintaining the equipment in working condition. During wartime mobilization such a division would be beefed up to full manpower strength; however, in peacetime a cadre division is unfit for any combat.


In 1995, of 81 land forces divisions, 51 were not combat ready. Of 26 brigades, 14 are not in a state of operational readiness. Airborne troops and two peacekeeping divisions had the highest level of readiness. By 1996 the ground forces included sixty-nine divisions: seventeen armored, forty-seven motorized infantry, and five airborne.


Under the new defense policy document signed by President Yeltsin on 1 August 1998, the number of divisions in the regular armed forces was to be reduced to ten. These were to be full-strength, high-readiness Ground Forces divisions, one of which will be specifically trained in peacekeeping operations. The divisions, deployed in various parts of the country, would engage exclusively in combat training. Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin (b. ...


The Motorized Rifle Troops have been mechanized infantry since 1957. The Soviet Union fielded a new model of armored personnel carrier (APC) every decade since the late 1950s, and in 1967 it deployed the world's first infantry fighting vehicle (IFV). Similar to an APC, the tactically innovative IFV had much greater firepower, in the form of a 73mm main gun, an antitank missile launcher, a heavy machine gun, and firing ports that allowed troops to fire their individual weapons from inside the vehicle. In 1989 the Soviet Union had an inventory of over 65,000 APCs and IFVs, with the latter accounting for almost half of this inventory.


The Soviet Ground Forces viewed the tank as their primary weapon. In 1989 the Tank Troops had five types of main battle tanks, including the T-54/55, T-62, T-64, T-72, and T-80. The greater part of the total tank inventory of 53,000 consisted of older, although still highly potent, T-54/55 and T-62 tanks.


The Rocket Troops and Artillery have been an important combat arm of the Ground Forces because of the belief that firepower has tremendous destructive and psychological effect on the enemy. In 1989 the Ground Forces had eighteen artillery divisions, in addition to the artillery and missile units organic to armies and divisions. Artillery and surface-to-surface missile brigades were attached to each combined arms or tank army. An artillery regiment and a surface-to-surface missile battalion were parts of each Soviet motorized rifle and tank division. In 1989 the Rocket Troops and Artillery manned 1,400 "operational-tactical" surface-to-surface missile launchers.


People's Republic of China

The People’s Liberation Army (PLA) deploys the world’s largest ground force, currently totalling some 1.6 million personnel, or about 70% of the PLA’s total manpower (2.3 million in 2005). The ground forces are divided into 7 military regions (MR). The regular forces of the ground forces consist of 18 group armies, which are corps-size combined arms units each with 24,000~50,000 personnel. The group armies contain among them 25 infantry divisions, 28 infantry brigades, 9 armoured divisions, 9 armoured brigades, 2 artillery divisions, 19 artillery brigades, 19 antiaircraft artillery/air-defence missile brigades, and 10 army aviation (helicopter) regiments. There are also three airborne divisions, which are manned by the PLA Air Force (PLAAF). The PLA Navy (PLAN) has two multi-arm marine brigades. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


In time of crisis, the PLA ground forces will be reinforced by numerous reserve and paramilitary units. The PLA reserve component has about 1.2~1.5 million personnel divided into 50 infantry, artillery, and anti-aircraft artillery (AAA) divisions. In addition, approximately 1.1 million personnel serve in the People’s Armed Police (PAP), which includes internal security and border defence forces under the control of the Ministry of Public Security. The PAP internal security forces are organised into 14 mobile divisions, 31 provisional/municipal internal security general corps, and 23 provisional/municipal border defence general corps. The Peoples Armed Police Force (PAP) (人民武装警察部队; Renmin wuzhuang jingcha budui) is a paramilitary police force primarily responsible for domestic security within the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Ministry of Public Security (MPS) (公安部, pinyin: gōng ān bù) is the principal police authority in the mainland of the Peoples Republic of China and the agency that is responsible for most of the day-to-day police work in mainland China. ...


The PLA’s tank inventory was numbered around 10,000 during its peak time in the 1980s/90s, but this was estimated to have reduced to 6,000~8,000 over the past few years. The Chinese-produced versions of the Soviet T-54/55 (Type 59/69) account for over 2/3 of the total PLA tank inventory. While retiring some of the older Type 59/69 series and replacing them with the second generation Type 88 and Type 96, the PLA is also upgrading the remaining Type 59/69 series tanks with new technologies including improved communication and fire-control systems, night vision equipment, explosive reactive armour, improved powerplant, and gun-fired anti-tank missiles so that they can remain in service as mobile fire-support platforms.


The PLA also operates about 2,000 light tanks including the Type 62 light tank and the Type 63 amphibious tank, both of which entered production in the 1960s. The Type 63 has now been replaced by the improved Type 63A featuring computerised fire-control, gun-fired anti-tank guided missile (ATGM), night fighting equipment, satellite navigation, and improved powerplant.


The armoured combat units previously known as tank divisions and brigades are now called armoured divisions and brigades to reflect their more combined arms nature. The PLA has transformed some former motorised infantry divisions (truck mobile) into mechanised units with tracked or wheeled armoured personnel carriers (APC). Two amphibious mechanised divisions were also created in Nanjing and Guangzhou MR. At least 40% of PLA divisions and brigades are now mechanised or armoured, almost double the percentage before the reduction. A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around 10,000 soldiers. ...


Pakistan

The Pakistani army, which traces its lineage to the British Army and its doctrines to the United States Army, has evolved its operational use of its 20 Infantry, 2 Armoured and an unknown number of Artillery and Air Defence Divisions based upon the exepriences in its war with India, as well as the nature of the task facing it. The Pakistani Army faces varied operational conditions, thus the tasks allocated to different divisions also vary.


A division, typically is subordinate to a Corps, e.g. 17 Infantry Division is subordinated to I Corps, though it is believed that Air Defence and Artillery Divisions are directly under the command of field armies, which are activated in war time. A division typically has three or four Brigades, however this varies according to the role and the threat facing that particular formation, 12th Infantry Division for example has 6 brigades, while others might only have 2. An Infantry division also has a number of troops in supporting roles, i.e armour, artillery, air defence, Air Elements as well as engineering and logistics, organized in brigades or battalions (as required for a total strength of 15-20,000 men.


See also

An Air Division (AD) was a United States Air Force echelon of command. ... The article provides links to lists of military divisions arranged by ordinal number, name, country or conflict. ... A military unit is an organisation within an armed force. ...

References

  • Creveld, Martin van. The Art of War: War and Military Thought. London: Cassell, 2000. ISBN 0-304-35264-0
  • Jones, Archer. The Art of War in the Western World. University of Illinois Press, 2000. ISBN 0-252-06966-8

  Results from FactBites:
 
Division (military) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3984 words)
In most modern militaries, a division tends to be the largest combined arms unit capable of independent operations; due to its self-sustaining role as a unit with a range of combat troops and suitable combat support forces, which can be divided into various organic combinations.
This does not mean that divisions are equal in size or structure from military to military, but generally divisions have in most cases come to be units of 10,000 to 20,000 troops with substantial enough support organic to the unit to be capable of independent operations.
Usually the direct organization of the division consists of one to four brigades or regiments of the combat arm of the division along with a brigade or regiment of combat support (usually artillery) and a number of direct-reporting battalions for various specialized support tasks (often reconnaissance and combat engineers).
Division - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (285 words)
Division (organisation), a subsidiary of a larger organisation
Division (military), a unit typically consisting of from 10,000 to 20,000 troops
Division (botany), a classification of plants (the botanical counterpart to zoology's phylum)
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