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Encyclopedia > Diving suit
Two divers, one wearing a 1 atmosphere diving suit and the other standard diving dress, preparing to explore the wreck of the RMS Lusitania, 1935
Two divers, one wearing a 1 atmosphere diving suit and the other standard diving dress, preparing to explore the wreck of the RMS Lusitania, 1935

A diving suit is a garment or device designed to protect a diver from the underwater environment. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1828x1200, 241 KB) J. Peress 1-atm dive suit, Tritonia, explored the Lusitania wreck in 1935. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1828x1200, 241 KB) J. Peress 1-atm dive suit, Tritonia, explored the Lusitania wreck in 1935. ... RMS Mauretania, the Lusitanias sister ship. ... Diving refers to the sport acrobatically jumping or falling into water. ... An underwater scene just beneath the surface. ...


Modern diving suits can be divided into two kinds:

  • "soft" or ambient pressure diving suits - examples are wetsuits, drysuits, semi-dry suits and dive skins
  • "hard" or atmospheric pressure diving suits - an armored suit that permits a diver to remain at atmospheric pressure whilst operating at depth where the water pressure is high. Main article: atmospheric diving suits.

Standard diving dress is now obsolete but is historically interesting. Pressure (symbol: p) is the force per unit area acting on a surface in a direction perpendicular to that surface. ... A modern steamer with superflex properties. ... diurnal (daily) rhythm of air pressure in northern Germany (black curve is air pressure) Atmospheric pressure is the pressure above any area in the Earths atmosphere caused by the weight of air. ... Two divers, one wearing a 1 atmosphere diving suit and the other standard diving dress, preparing to explore the wreck of the RMS Lusitania, 1935. ... Hardhat diver entering water at Stoney Cove, England A standard diving dress consists of a metallic (copper, brass or bronze) diving helmet, an airline or hose from a surface supplied diving air pump, a canvas diving suit and boots. ...

Contents


Ambient pressure suits

There are four main types of ambient pressure diving suits:

  • wetsuits
  • drysuits
  • semi-dry suits
  • dive skins

These types of suit are not exclusively used by divers but are often used for thermal protection by people engaged in other water activities such as surfing, sailing, powerboating, windsurfing, waterskiing, caving and swimming. Surfing outside Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. ... Sailing at sunset Wooden sailing boat Sailing is the skillful art of controlling the motion of a sailing ship or smaller boat, across a body of water. ... Power boating describes activities performed in a motorized boat. ... Windsurfing (also called boardsailing) is a sport involving travel over water on a small 2-4. ... Recreational skiiers typically use two skis — other techniques abound. ... Inside the cave at Cave Stream, New Zealand Caving is the recreational sport of exploring caves. ... A breaststroke swimmer Swimming is a technique to move unaided through water. ...


Ambient pressure suits are a form of exposure protection protecting the wearer from the cold. They also provide some defence from abrasive and sharp objects as well as potentially harmful underwater life. They do not protect divers from the pressure of the surrounding water or resulting barotrauma and decompression sickness. Hypothermia is a medical condition in which the victims core body temperature has dropped to significantly below normal and normal metabolism begins to be impaired. ... Barotrauma is physical damage to body tissues caused by a difference in pressure between an air space inside or beside the body and the surrounding gas or liquid. ... Decompression sickness (DCS), divers disease, the bends, or caisson disease is the name given to a variety of symptoms suffered by a person exposed to a reduction in the pressure surrounding their body. ...


The suits are often made from Neoprene, heavy-duty fabric coated with rubber, or PVC. Neoprene is the DuPont Chemical trade name for a family of synthetic rubbers based on polychloroprene. ... Rubber is an elastic hydrocarbon polymer which occurs as a milky emulsion (known as latex) in the sap of several varieties of plants though can be produced synthetically. ... Polyvinyl chloride, commonly abbreviated PVC, is a widely-used plastic. ...


Added buoyancy, created by the volume of the suit, is a side effect of diving suits. Sometimes a weightbelt must be worn to counteract this buoyancy. Some drysuits have controls allowing the suit to be inflated to reduce "squeeze" caused by increasing pressure; they also have vents allowing the excess air to be removed from the suit on ascent. In physics, buoyancy is an upward force on an object immersed in a fluid (i. ... Divers wear weighting systems, weight belts or weights, generally made of lead, to counteract the buoyancy of other diving equipment, such as diving suits and aluminium diving cylinders. ...


Wetsuits

Main article: wetsuit

Wetsuits are relatively inexpensive, simple, Neoprene suits that are typically used where the water temperature is between 10 and 25 °C (50 to 80 °F). A modern steamer with superflex properties. ... Neoprene is the DuPont Chemical trade name for a family of synthetic rubbers based on polychloroprene. ...


Drysuits

Drysuits are used typically where the water temperature is between -2 and 15 °C (28 to 60 °F).


Seals at the wrists and neck prevent water entering the suit. Even so, the diver will be damp after a dive in a drysuit due to sweat and condensation. The seals are either made from latex rubber or Neoprene. Latex seals are supple but survive for a maximum of about two years before they must be removed from the suit and replaced. Neoprene seals last longer but let more water enter because, being stiffer, they do not make effective seals in the contours of the wrist and neck. SWEAT is an OLN/TSN show hosted by Julie Zwillich that aired in 2003-2004. ... Condensation is the change in matter of a substance to a denser phase, such as gas (or vapor) to a liquid. ...


A modern diving drysuit has an air inflation valve, which lets the diver control the buoyancy of the suit by injecting gas from the diving regulator to avoid squeeze during descent. Some old-type frogman's drysuits had a small "jack cylinder" to be inflated from, or the frogman (who was using an oxygen rebreather and so limited to about 30 feet (10 m) depth) had to put up with the suit squeeze. A gas pressure regulator has one or more valves in series, which let the gas out of a gas cylinder in a controlled way, lowering its pressure at each stage. ... Frogman is a popular term for a scuba diver. ... Inspiration closed circuit diving rebreather A rebreather is a type of breathing set that provides a breathing gas containing oxygen and recycles exhaled gas. ...


A drysuit is intended to be worn over an insulating undersuit such as those under the brand names Thinsulate or Polar Bear. Some divers wear a wetsuit under the drysuit instead. Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub | Diving ... A modern steamer with superflex properties. ...


A typical drysuit has an air vent valve, which lets the diver vent off higher pressure gas from the suit during the ascent. Vent valves can be automatic, operating as pressure relief valves, or manual, where the diver must raise the valve to vent. Automatic vents are generally located at the shoulder and manual vents are located at the wrist. Some drysuits have no vents, but the diver must pull one of the wrist or neck seals open to vent the drysuit.


Most drysuits have built-in boots, but some have ankle seals instead.


Modern drysuits have a waterproof zipper, for entry and exit, across the back of the shoulders, or diagonally across the front of the torso, or straight down the middle of the front. Before the invention of waterproof zips other methods had to be devised; at least one make of old-type British frogman's drysuit was one-piece with a wide neck hole for entry; the bottom of the hood and the edge of the suit's neck hole were clamped together by a large circular steel clamp around his neck; there was a watertight seal in the bottom of the hood. Frogman is a popular term for a scuba diver. ...


There are two types of drysuit:

  • Membrane dry suits are made from thin materials, with a consequent poor thermal insulation, such as vulcanised rubber or from laminated layers of nylon, butyl rubber and nylon. The diver must wear an insulating undersuit. Membrane drysuits are comfortable to put on, get off and wear. They can be unreliable because the suit’s buoyancy and insulation depends on the air trapped in the under suit: if the suit is punctured the buoyancy and insulation is lost. In warm waters some divers wear a membrane drysuit without an undersuit. Membrane drysuits may also be constructed with a waterproof and breathable membrane to enable comfortable wear for periods out of water.
  • Neoprene dry suits are constructed from Neoprene, a buoyant and thermally insulating material. This built-in buoyancy and thermal protection makes them safer to wear than membrane dry suits when punctured because they keep some of those properties when flooded. Being made of a fairly rigid heavy material, they are difficult to get on and off, and their buoyancy and thermal protection decreases with depth as the Neoprene is compressed. Neoprene also tends to shrink over the years. An alternative is crushed Neoprene, which is less susceptible to volume changes when under pressure and shrinks less.

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Nylon represents a family of synthetic polymers, a thermoplastic material, invented in 1935 by Wallace Carothers at DuPont. ... Butyl rubber is a synthetic rubber, a random copolymer of about 98% of isobutylene with about 2% of isoprene. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub | Diving ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub | Diving ... Neoprene is the DuPont Chemical trade name for a family of synthetic rubbers based on polychloroprene. ...

Semi-dry suits

Semi-dry suits are used typically where the water temperature is between 10 and 20 °C (50 to 70 °F). They are effectively a thick wetsuit with better-than-usual seals at wrist, neck and ankles.


The seals limit the volume of water entering and leaving the suit. The wearer gets wet in a semi-dry suit but the water that enters is soon warmed up and does not leave the suit readily, so the wearer remains warm. The trapped layer of water does not add to the suit's insulating ability. Any residual water circulation past the seals still causes heat loss. But semi-dry suits are cheap and simple compared to dry suits. They are made from thick Neoprene, which provides good thermal protection. They lose buoyancy and thermal protection as the trapped gas bubbles in the Neoprene compress at depth. Semi-dry suits can come in various configurations including a single piece or two pieces, made of 'long johns' and a separate 'jacket'. Semi dry suits do not usually include boots, so a separate pair of insulating boots are worn.


Dive skins

Dive skins are used when diving in water temperatures above 25 degrees C, 77 degrees F. They are made from Spandex and provide little thermal protection, but protect the skin from stings and abrasion. This kind of suit is also known as a 'Stinger Suit'. Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity (stretchability). ...


Diving suit combinations

  • Some divers wear a wetsuit under a membrane drysuit.
  • Some divers wear a thin "shorty" wetsuit under a full wetsuit.
  • Some divers wear a "skins" under a wetsuit. This practice started with divers (of both sexes) wearing women's body tights under a wetsuit to get a bit of extra warmth.

See also

U.S. Navy diving dress being lowered into the water
U.S. Navy diving dress being lowered into the water

Diving suit - source: family of Rupert C. King File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Diving suit - source: family of Rupert C. King File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Timeline of underwater technology // Pre-industrial Several centuries BC: (Relief carvings made at this time show Assyrian soldiers crossing rivers using inflated goatskin floats. ... Apollo 15 space suit A spacesuit is a complex system of garments, equipment, and environmental systems designed to keep a person alive and comfortable in the harsh environment of outer space. ... Hardhat diver entering water at Stoney Cove, England A standard diving dress consists of a metallic (copper, brass or bronze) diving helmet, an airline or hose from a surface supplied diving air pump, a canvas diving suit and boots. ...

External links

  • Scuba Gear Directory Reviews of Scuba Gear: over 180 wetsuits
  • Elios, Italy
  • Exceed Wetsuits
  • DUI
  • Experimental Dive Suit Flies Navy Divers Where None Have Gone Before
  • Gates
  • O'Three
  • Polar Bears: a make of undersuit
  • Sheico
  • USIA
  • Viking
  • Scuba America Historical Center
  • Wet Suit Pursuit: Hugh Bradner's Development of the First Wet Suit
  • Surfing whodunit: Who invented the first wetsuit?

  Results from FactBites:
 
Diving suit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2516 words)
A diving suit is a garment or device designed to protect a diver from the underwater environment.
A modern diving drysuit has an air inflation valve, which lets the diver control the buoyancy of the suit by injecting gas from the diving regulator to avoid squeeze during descent.
Membrane dry suits are made from thin materials, with a consequent poor thermal insulation, such as vulcanised rubber or from laminated layers of nylon, butyl rubber and nylon.
Diving suit - definition of Diving suit in Encyclopedia (2037 words)
Modern diving suits can be divided into two kinds: ambient pressure or "soft" diving suits and "hard" or atmospheric pressure diving suits.
Ambient pressure diving suits are a form of exposure protection used in scuba diving or free diving.
A side effect of diving suits is that they also provide buoyancy, which the diver must control underwater.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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