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Encyclopedia > Divine Providence

In theology, Divine Providence, or simply Providence, is the sovereignty, superintendence, or agency of God over events in people's lives and throughout history. Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The title page to The Historians History of the World. ...

Contents

Etymology

This word comes from Latin providnetios "foresight, precaution", from pro- "ahead" + videre "to see". The current meaning of the word (Divine Providence) derives from the sense "knowledge of the future" or omniscience, which was the privilege of gods. The initial meaning of providere remains in 'to provide' = "to take precautionary measures". Omniscience is the capacity to know everything infinitely, or at least everything that can be known about a character including thoughts, feelings, life and the universe, etc. ...


In Christian thought

Protestant theology

This term is an integral part of John Calvin's theological framework known as Calvinism, which emphasizes the depravity of man and the complete sovereignty of God. God's plan for the world and every soul that he has created is guided by his will, or providence. According to Calvin, the idea that man has a free will and is able to make choices independently of what God has already determined is based on our limited understanding of God's perfection and the delusion that God's purposes can be circumvented. In this mode of thought, providence is related to predestination. John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Calvinism is a theological... Predestination and foreordination are religious concepts, under which the relationship between the beginning of things and the destiny of things is discussed. ...


The idea of providence as a central issue of piety was further developed by many of Calvin's followers, such as the English Puritans. In modern times, this concept remains prominent among many Protestant denominations that identify with Calvinism, the Reformed churches. The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Calvinism is a theological... -1...


Swedenborgian theology

Divine Providence is also a book (see external links), published by Emanuel Swedenborg in 1764, which describes his systematic theology regarding providence, free will, theodicy, and other related topics. Both meanings of the word providence described above ('foresight' and 'to provide') are applicable in the theology defined in Swedenborg's writings in that providence encompasses understanding, intent and action. Divine Providence relative to man is 'foresight', and relative to the Lord is 'providence'[1]. Swedenborg proposes that one law of Divine Providence is that man should act from freedom according to reason, and that man is regenerated according to the faculties of rationality and liberty[2]. Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Free-Will is a Japanese independent record label founded in 1986. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Catholic theology

St. Augustine of Hippo is perhaps most famously associated with the doctrine of Divine Providence in the Latin West. However, Christian teaching on providence in the high Middle Ages was most fully developed by St. Thomas Aquinas in Summa Theologica. Providence, as care exercised by the Supreme Being over the universe, His foresight and care for its future is extensively developed and explained by Thomas Aquinas and modern thomists. One of the studies by foremost modern thomist, Dominican father Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange entitled "Providence. God's loving care for man and the need for confidence in Almighty God." (published first in 1932) presents and solves in the light of Catholic doctrine the most difficult issues as related to providence. In the subsequent generation, Catholic theologians such as Henri de Lubac and Hans urs von Balthasar developed the doctrine in ways which emphasized its biblical and Augustinian origins in Catholic thought. “Augustinus” redirects here. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas (also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... The Summa Theologica (also widely known as the Summa Theologiae) is the most famous work of St. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas (also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... Thomism is the philosophical school that followed in the legacy of St. ... Reginald Marie Garrigou-Lagrange (1877 - 1964) was a Catholic theologian and is generally accepted to be the greatest neo-thomist of the 20th century. ... Henri de Lubac (February 20, 1896-September 4, 1991), a French Jesuit, can be considered to be one of the most influential theologians of post-modern time. ... Hans Urs von Balthasar (August 12, 1905—June 26, 1988) was a Swiss theologian and was nominated to be a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


In deistic thought

Since deism does not have dogma, individual deists are free to believe in Providence or not to, whichever is more reasonable to them. Many do believe that God's plan has carefully provided for humanity. For other uses, see Ceremonial deism. ... Dogma (the plural is either dogmata or dogmas, Greek , plural ) is the established belief or doctrine held by a religion, ideology or any kind of organization, thought to be authoritative and not to be disputed or doubted. ...


Some allege that George Washington belonged to the latter group of deists. While believing Providence had a hand in the victory of his Revolutionaries, he believed and said that Providence is "inscrutable"[3]; he told his men to fight and work hard so they would win the favor of Providence. See George Washington and religion. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... This, the earliest portrait of Washington, was painted in 1772 by Charles Willson Peale, and shows Washington in uniform as colonel of the Virginia Regiment. ...


In Jewish thought

Divine providence (Hebrew השגחה פרטית Hasgochoh Protis / Hasgachah Pratit lit. [Divine] supervision of the individual) is discussed throughout Rabbinic literature, and in particular by the classical Jewish philosophers. The discussion brings into consideration the Jewish understanding of nature, and its reciprocal, the miraculous. This analysis thus underpins much of Orthodox Judaism's worldview, particularly as regards questions of interaction with the natural world. “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Rabbinic literature, in the broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of Judaisms rabbinic writing/s throughout history. ... “Natural” redirects here. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by a God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Worldview is Chicago Public Radios daily international-affairs radio show, hosted by Jerome McDonnell. ...


Classical Jewish philosophy

Divine providence is discussed by all of the major thinkers, but its extent and nature is a matter of dispute [4]. There are, broadly, two views, differing largely as to the frequency with which God intervenes in the natural order. The first view admits a frequency of miracles. Here there is a stability of the natural order which nevertheless allows for the interference of God in the regulation of human events, or even in disturbing the natural order on occasion. The second, rationalist view does not deny the occurrence of miracles, but attempts to limit it, and will rationalize the numerous miraculous events related in the Bible and bring them within the sphere of the natural order. Jewish philosophy refers to the conjunction between serious study of philosophy and Jewish theology. ... The natural order is the moral source from which natural law seeks to derive its authority. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by a God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ...


Nachmanides

The teachings of Nachmanides ("Ramban") are largely representative of the first view. He holds that the Creator endowed the universe with physical properties, and sustains the natural order, and that any act of providence involves — by definition — an intrusion into the laws of nature. In the absence of providential interference, cause and effect governs the affairs of the universe. In Ramban's view, reward and punishment — as well as guidance of the fate of Israel — are the typical expressions of such providence (see Ramban: Torat Hashem Temimah). In this sense there is no difference between God causing it to rain (as a reward) and His separating the waters of the Red Sea. Both are the result of Divine intervention. Nahmanides is the common name for Moshe ben Nahman Gerondi; the name is a Greek translation of the Hebrew Ben Nahman, meaning Son of Nahman. He is also commomly known as Ramban, being an acronym of his Hebrew name and title, Rabbi Moshe ben Nahman, and by his Catalan name... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... “Natural” redirects here. ... The natural order is the moral source from which natural law seeks to derive its authority. ... Cause and Effect is considered by many fans to be one of the best episodes of the series Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Rain is a type of precipitation which forms when separate drops of water fall to the Earths surface from clouds. ... In Black is the traditional Exodus Routes as agreed on by Biblical Scholars, Historians, and Geologists. ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ...

"And from the great and well-known miracles a man comes to admit to hidden miracles which are the foundation of the whole Torah. A person has no portion in the Torah of Moses unless he believes that all our matters and circumstances are miracles and they do not follow nature or the general custom of the world …rather, if one does mitzvot he will succeed due to the reward he merits …" (Exodus 13:16 ad loc)

All events (natural or providential) are the result of the direct will of God, and, as such, the seemingly natural order of the world is an illusion. At the same time, any (obvious) breach in the chain of causality involves a "compromise” in the default cause and effect nature of the universe — providence is thus exercised sparingly, and in a "seemingly natural" manner (Genesis 6:19 ad loc). Thus, whereas the fate of the Jews as a nation is guided by providence, individuals do not enjoy the same providential relationship with the Almighty. Only the righteous and the wicked can expect providential treatment. The fate of more “average” individuals is primarily guided by natural law (Deuteronomy 11:13 ad loc). A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by a God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... “Tora” redirects here. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Exodus is the second book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Genesis (‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible. ...


Maimonides

Maimonides ("Rambam") is representative of the rationalist school. He holds that the pattern of nature is basically immutable. “This Universe remains perpetually with the same properties with which the Creator has endowed it… none of these will ever be changed except by way of miracle in some individual instances….” (Guide 2:29). This notwithstanding, Maimonides believes that God rewards and punishes appropriately. Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... This article is not about continental rationalism. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by a God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... The Guide for the Perplexed (Hebrew:מורה נבוכים, translit. ...


To some extent, Rambam reconciles the two views by defining providence as an essentially natural process. Here individual providence depends on the development of the human mind: that is, the more a man develops his mind the more he is subject to the providence of God. Providence is, in fact, a function of intellectual and spiritual activity: it is the activity, not the person that merits providence. "Divine Providence is connected with Divine intellectual influence, and the same beings which are benefited by the latter so as to become intellectual, and to comprehend things comprehensible to rational beings, are also under the control of Divine Providence, which examines all their deeds in order to reward or punish them." (Guide 3:17). The Guide for the Perplexed (Hebrew:מורה נבוכים, translit. ...


Further, by defining Providence as function of human activity, Maimonides avoids the problem of how God can be affected by events on Earth, lessening any implication of change within God and the resultant implication of a lack of perfection. [5]; see Divine simplicity. Maimonides, relatedly, views "reward and punishment" as manifesting in the World to Come as opposed to in this world (see Talmud, Kiddushin 39b; Pirkei Avot 2:16) — he therefore defines Divine providence as that which facilitates intellectual attainment as opposed to as an instrument of reward and punishment. In theology, the doctrine of divine simplicity says that God is without parts. ... There are a number of basic Jewish principles of faith that were formulated by medieval rabbinic authorities. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The first page of the Vilna Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Berachot, folio 2a. ... Pirkei Avoth (Hebrew: Chapters of the Fathers, פרקי אבות ) or simply Avoth is a tractate of the Mishna composed of ethical maxims of the Rabbis of the Mishnaic period. ...

“[The] reward given for fulfilling commandments is life in the World to Come.. [So] where it is written that if one listens, one will receive such-and-such, and that if one doesn't listen such-and-such will happen to one … such as plenty, famine, war, peace, monarchy, humility, living in Israel, exile, success, misfortune … [this refers to that] which will aid us in fulfilling the Torah, [and which] will be influenced to come our way so that we will not have to occupy ourselves all day in obtaining bodily needs, but that we will be free … to learn and gather knowledge and fulfill commandments.” (Mishneh Torah, Teshuva 9:1.)

This article is about commandments in Judaism. ... The Mishneh Torah or Yad ha-Chazaka is a code of Jewish law by one of the most important Jewish authorities, Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, better known as Maimonides or by the Hebrew abbreviation RaMBaM (usually written Rambam in English). ...

Contemporary Orthodox thought

From a religious point of view, the extent to which nature is fixed, and to which God intervenes in human affairs, will have very strong implications as to what level, and kind, of interaction with the natural world are appropriate. The question of Divine providence thus remains relevant in (Orthodox) Jewish thought. In fact, both of the above approaches continue to influence contemporary Orthodox Judaism. In general, Nachmanides' view is influential in Ultra Orthodox Haredi Judaism, while Maimonides' view — in addition to Nachmanides' — underpins much of Modern Orthodox thought. The difference between the two approaches manifests particularly in the importance assigned to, and attitudes toward, three areas: This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Nahmanides is the common name for Moshe ben Nahman Gerondi; the name is a Greek translation of the Hebrew Ben Nahman, meaning Son of Nahman. He is also commomly known as Ramban, being an acronym of his Hebrew name and title, Rabbi Moshe ben Nahman, and by his Catalan name... Haredi or chareidi Judaism is the most theologically conservative form of Orthodox Judaism. ... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Modern Orthodox Judaism (or Modern Orthodox or Modern Orthodoxy; sometimes abbreviated as MO or Modox) is a movement within Orthodox Judaism that attempts to synthesize traditional observance and values with the secular, modern world. ...

  • Derech eretz: involvement with the natural world, particularly for purposes of livelihood.
  • Technology: the use and manipulation of nature.
  • Madda: knowledge of the functioning of nature and society, both to facilitate derech eretz and as a complement to Torah study.

Torah im Derech Eretz (Hebrew תורה עם דרך ארץ - Torah with the way of the land) is a philosophy of Orthodox Judaism articulated by Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (1808-1888), which formalizes a relationship between traditionally observant Judaism and the modern world. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Look up Complement in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Torah study is the study by Jews of the Torah, Tanakh, Talmud, responsa, rabbinic literature and similar works, all of which are Judaisms religious texts, for the purpose of the mitzvah (commandment) of Torah study itself, meaning study for religious (as opposed to academic) purposes. ...

Haredi Judaism

The view of Rabbi Eliyahu Eliezer Dessler is representative of the Haredi approach. To generalise, Rabbi Dessler [6] (along with the Chazon Ish) teaches that given the illusory "nature of nature", each individual must find their appropriate balance between personal effort (hishtadlus / hishtadlut השתדלות) and trust (bitochon / bitachon ביטחון). "Rav Dessler", relatedly, often repeated the idea that every object and circumstance in the material world should be viewed as a means of serving Hashem (God). Rabbi, in Judaism, means a religious ‘teacher’, or more literally, ‘great one’. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root word , rav, which in biblical Hebrew means ‘great’ or ‘distinguished (in knowledge)’. Sephardic and Yemenite Jews pronounce this word ribbÄ«; the modern Israeli pronunciation rabbÄ« is derived from a... Eliyahu Eliezer Dessler ([ [ 1892]]-[[30 diciembre ] ] [ [ 1953 ] ]) era un influyente [ [ juda�smo ortodoxo|Jud�o ortodoxo ] ] [ [ rabbi ] ], [ [ erudito de Talmud]]ic, y fil�sofo jud�o del vig�simo siglo. ... Rabbi Avraham Yishayahu Karelitz, The Chazon Ish Avraham Yishayahu Karelitz (Abraham Isaiah Karelitz) (1878-1953) known by his pen name as the Chazon Ish (in Hebrew: Vision [of] Man), was a Lithuanian born Orthodox Judaism rabbi who became leader of Haredi Judaism in Israel. ... Hashem/השם, literally: The Name is a term used by Orthodox Jews to casually refer to God, Whose Name is only used in blessings and prayer. ...

  • In line with Ramban, Rabbi Dessler defines nature as the arena of "Nisayon" (נסיון Hebrew: [spiritual] test) — i.e. one will engage in derech eretz in inverse proportion to his recognition of God's providential role. Rabbi Dessler thus advises (based on Mesillat Yesharim Ch. 21) that one make his Torah fixed (kavua קבוע) and his derech eretz temporary and contingent on circumstances (arai עראי). Note that Rabbi Dessler stresses that "[one cannot] exploit a tendency to laziness in order to bolster his bitochon in Hashem ("trust in God") … Trust in Hashem cannot be built up this way because the goal here is not to refrain from work but to attain certainty in bitochon in Hashem that leads to lessening worldly endeavors."
  • Given this conception of nature, Rav Dessler castigates preoccupation with technological enterprises and deems this the equivalent of idolatry. He writes that a civilization which is preoccupied with developing the external and the material, and neglects the inner moral content will eventually degenerate to its lowest possible depths [7]: “Happiness in this world comes only as a result of being content with what one has in this world, and striving intensively for spirituality” and thus “the more that people try to improve this world, the more their troubles will backlash … Instead of realizing they are drowning in materialism, they search for further ways to enhance physicality” (See Mikhtav me-Eliyahu, vol. 2 p. 236-310 and vol. 3 p.143-70). [8]
  • Rav Dessler writes that the acquisition of secular knowledge is unlikely to be other than at the expense of Torah knowledge. "[T]he philosophy of Yeshiva education is directed towards one objective alone, to nurture Gedolei Torah ("greats in Torah knowledge") and Yirei Shamayim (those "fearful of Heaven") in tandem. For this reason university was prohibited to [yeshiva] students… [educators] could not see how to nurture Gedolei Torah unless they directed all education towards Torah exclusively" (letter in Mikhtav me-Eliyahu vol. 3). [9]

“Hebrew” redirects here. ... Torah im Derech Eretz (Hebrew תורה עם דרך ארץ - Torah with the way of the land) is a philosophy of Orthodox Judaism articulated by Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (1808-1888), which formalizes a relationship between traditionally observant Judaism and the modern world. ... In mathematics, two quantities are called proportional if they vary in such a way that one of the quantities is a constant multiple of the other, or equivalently if they have a constant ratio. ... The work Mesillat Yesharim was composed by the influential Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato (1707-1746) in 1740 when living in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and published in the same city. ... Hashem/השם, literally: The Name is a term used by Orthodox Jews to casually refer to God, Whose Name is only used in blessings and prayer. ... Idolatry is a major sin in the Abrahamic religions regarding image. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... In philosophy, materialism is that form of physicalism which holds that the only thing that can truly be said to exist is matter; that fundamentally, all things are composed of material and all phenomena are the result of material interactions. ... This article is about the Jewish educational system. ...

Modern Orthodox Judaism

Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik — probably Modern Orthodoxy’s most influential theologian — echoes Maimonides’ teaching. He writes that “the fundamental of providence is… transformed into a concrete commandment, an obligation incumbent upon man. Man is obliged to broaden the scope and strengthen the intensity of the individual providence that watches over him. Everything is dependent on him; it is all in his hands”. (Halakhic Man, p. 128) Rabbi, in Judaism, means a religious ‘teacher’, or more literally, ‘great one’. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root word , rav, which in biblical Hebrew means ‘great’ or ‘distinguished (in knowledge)’. Sephardic and Yemenite Jews pronounce this word ribbÄ«; the modern Israeli pronunciation rabbÄ« is derived from a... Rav Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov, Yoshe Ber) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Rav Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov, Yoshe Ber) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ...

  • In line with this emphasis on proactivity, Modern Orthodox thought regards derech eretz, Man's involvement with the natural world, as a divine imperative inherent in the nature of creation (as opposed to as a "necessary evil" as above). Here, "worldly involvement" extends to a positive contribution to general society [10]. This understanding is reflected both in Soloveitchik's conception as well as in the teachings of Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch; see Torah Umadda, Torah im Derech Eretz.
  • Similarly, Rabbi Soloveitchik, in The Lonely Man of Faith, mandates the involvement of human beings in technological activity. This is based on God's blessing to Adam and Eve "Fill the land and conquer it" (Genesis 1:28), which extends to the obligation of imitatio dei. The use and development of Technology, then, is not characterised as "prideful", but rather is seen as obligatory upon man.
  • Further, Madda, knowledge of the natural world and society, is regarded as vital in Modern Orthodox thought. This knowledge plays an obvious role in the facilitation of derech eretz and the development of technology. It is also seen as valuable as a complement to Torah study. This further reflects Maimonides, in that he, famously, defines science and philosophy as "Handmaidens" of Torah study — one could not be a learned Jew without this knowledge [11].

This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ... Torah im Derech Eretz (Hebrew תורה עם דרך ארץ - Torah with the way of the land) is a philosophy of Orthodox Judaism articulated by Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (1808-1888), which formalizes a relationship between traditionally observant Judaism and the modern world. ... This article is about commandments in Judaism. ... Rabbi S.R. Hirsch Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (June 20, 1808 – December 31, 1888) was the intellectual founder of the Torah im Derech Eretz school of contemporary Orthodox Judaism. ... Torah Umadda (Hebrew: תורה ומדע, Torah and secular knowledge) is a philosophy of Modern Orthodox Judaism, concerning the interrelationship between the secular world and Judaism, and in particular between secular knowledge and Jewish knowledge. ... Torah im Derech Eretz (Hebrew תורה עם דרך ארץ - Torah with the way of the land) is a philosophy of Orthodox Judaism articulated by Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (1808-1888), which formalizes a relationship between traditionally observant Judaism and the modern world. ... Rav Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov, Yoshe Ber) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ... Genesis (‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Imitatio dei (Latin, imitating god) is a religious concept according to which virtue among man is found by resembling God, to which man should aspire. ... Torah Umadda (Hebrew: תורה ומדע, Torah and secular knowledge) is a philosophy of Modern Orthodox Judaism, concerning the interrelationship between the secular world and Judaism, and in particular between secular knowledge and Jewish knowledge. ... Look up Complement in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Torah study is the study by Jews of the Torah, Tanakh, Talmud, responsa, rabbinic literature and similar works, all of which are Judaisms religious texts, for the purpose of the mitzvah (commandment) of Torah study itself, meaning study for religious (as opposed to academic) purposes. ...

See also

For other uses of Fate, see Fate Destiny refers to a predetermined course of events. ... Omniscience is the capacity to know everything, or at least everything that can be known. ... Synchronicity is the experience of two or more events which occur in a meaningful manner, but which are causally inexplicable to the person or persons experiencing them. ... Qadar in Arabic means fate or divine destiny. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ S. Warren, Compendium of Swedenborg's Theological Writings, page 480
  2. ^ Swedenborg, E. Divine Providence, note 71-73
  3. ^ George Washington and Deism, deism.com
  4. ^ "Jewish Philosophy" Dagobert D. Runes, "Dictionary of Philosophy", 1942.
  5. ^ "How bad things can happen to good people" Rabbi Gidon Rothstein, Moreh Nevukhim—Chapter 51, Part 5
  6. ^ "Rav Eliyohu Eliezer Dessler, zt'l, His Fiftieth Yahrtzeit" Rabbi Dov Wein, Dei'ah veDibur, January 2004
  7. ^ "Cellular Terrorism" Rabbi Nosson Grossman, Dei'ah veDibur, May 2001
  8. ^ See also "Do We have a Hammer . . . or a Gun?" Mordechai Plaut, Dei'ah veDibur, December 2004
  9. ^ See also "Call to Stand Firm Against Chareidi Yeshiva High Schools" Yated Ne'eman Staff, December 2003
  10. ^ "Practical Endeavor and the Torah U'Madda Debate" Rabbi Dr. David Shatz, Torah U'Madda Volume 3: 1991-1992
  11. ^ "Tinsel Town does Morality" Rabbi D Hecht, nishma.org

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Divine Providence (3893 words)
Providence is assumed by Our Lord, who draws therefrom practical lessons both in regard to confidence in God (Matthew 6:25-33; 7:7-11; 10:28-31; Mark 11:22-4; Luke 11:9-13; John 16:26, 27) and in regard to the forgiveness of our enemies (Matthew 5:39-45; Luke 6:27-38); while in St.
Providence in the Fathers is almost invariably connected with the problem of evil.
Providence is based upon the consideration of the universe as a whole.
Divine Providence (1876 words)
Divine Providence is connected with Divine intellectual influence, and the same beings, which are benefited by the latter so as to become intellectual, and to comprehend things comprehensible to rational beings, are also under the control of Divine Providence, which examines all their deeds in order to reward or punish them.
The relation of Divine Providence is therefore not the same to all men; the greater the human perfection a person has attained, the greater the benefit he derives from Divine Providence.
Consider how the action of Divine Providence is described in reference to every incident in the lives of the patriarchs, to their occupations, and even to their passions, and how God promised to direct His attention to them.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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