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Encyclopedia > Districts of England

The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. As the structure of local government in England is not uniform, there are currently four types of district level subdivision. For local government purposes, England is divided into three types of areas - non-unitary authorities, unitary authorities, and London boroughs. ...


Some districts are styled as boroughs, cities, or royal boroughs. These are purely honorific titles, and do not alter the status of the district. A borough is a local government administrative subdivision used in the Canadian province of Quebec, in some states of the United States, and formerly in New Zealand. ... Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... English Regis Bere Regis Bognor Regis Grafton Regis Houghton Regis Lyme Regis Melcombe Regis Rowley Regis Wyke Regis Royal Royal Berkshire Royal Leamington Spa Royal Tunbridge Wells Royal Borough Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead Former Royal Borough...


All Boroughs and Cities, and some Districts, are led by a Mayor who in most cases is a ceremonial figure elected by the Council, but - after the most recent local government reform - is occasionally a directly Elected Mayor who takes most of the policy decisions instead of the Council. In the United Kingdom, the office of Mayor or Lord Mayor (Provost and Lord Provost in Scotland) had long been ceremonial posts, with little or no duties attached to it. ... A council is a group of people who usually possess some powers of governance. ... Directly-elected mayors (elected by the general electorate as opposed to by borough councils) were introduced into the United Kingdom in the 1990s and 2000s. ...

Contents


History

Main article: Subdivisions of England

The setting down of the current structure of districts in England began in 1965, when Greater London and its 32 London boroughs were created. They are the oldest type of district still in use. For local government purposes, England is divided into three types of areas - non-unitary authorities, unitary authorities, and London boroughs. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... The administrative area of Greater London contains 32 London Boroughs, of which twelve (plus the City of London) make up Inner London and twenty Outer London. ...


In 1974, metropolitan counties and non-metropolitan counties (also known as 'shire counties') were created across the rest of England and were spilt into Metropolitan districts, and Non-metropolitan districts. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... A shire county or non-metropolitan county in England, is an administrative county which is not a metropolitan county. ... A Metropolitan Borough (or Metropolitan District) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Non-metropolitan districts (usually just called Districts) are local government sub-divisions of English Counties. ...


The status of the London boroughs and metropolitan districts changed in 1986, when they absorbed the functions and some of the powers of the metropolitan county councils and the Greater London Council which were abolished. In London power is now shared again, albeit on a different basis, with the Greater London Authority. 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... For more coverage on London, see the London Portal. ...


During the 1990s a further kind of district was created, the unitary authority, which combined the functions and status of county and district. The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ...


Types

There are 36 metropolitan districts, 32 London boroughs, 284 non-metropolitan districts (if the Isle of Wight is counted as a district), the Isles of Scilly, and the City of London, making a total of 354 district-level authorities. A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... The administrative area of Greater London contains 32 London Boroughs, of which 12 (plus the City of London) make up Inner London and 20 Outer London. ... mason=gayboy(2004est. ... Coat of arms The City of London is a small area in Greater London. ...


Metropolitan districts

Main article: metropolitan districts

Metropolitan districts (or metropolitan boroughs) are a subdivision of a metropolitan county. These are similar to unitary authorities, as the metropolitan county councils were abolished in 1986. Most of the powers of the county councils were devolved to the districts but some services are run jointly by joint boards and organisations. The districts typically have populations of 174,000 to 1.1 million. A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... The six metropolitan counties shown within England The metropolitan counties are a type of county-level subnational entity in current use in England. ...


Non-metropolitan district (shire district)

Main article: Non-metropolitan district

Non-metropolitan districts (also known as shire districts) are second-tier authorities, which share power with county councils. They are subdivisions of shire counties and the most common type of district. The districts typically have populations of 25,000 to 200,000. Non-metropolitan districts (usually just called Districts) are local government sub-divisions of English Counties. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... A shire county or non-metropolitan county in England, is an administrative county which is not a metropolitan county. ...


Where this two-tier system exists, the county councils are responsible for running some local services, such as education, social services, and roads. District councils run other services, such as waste collection, local planning, and council housing. A social worker is a person employed in the administration of charity, social service, welfare, and poverty agencies, advocacy, or religious outreach programs. ... De Beauvoir Estate, De Beauvoir Town, East London The council house is a form of public housing found in the United Kingdom. ...


The number of non-metropolitan districts has varied over time. Initially there were 296; after mergers in the 1990s their numbers were reduced to 284. The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ...


Unitary authorities

Main article: unitary authority

These are single-tier districts which have no second level of government, and are responsible for running all local services in their areas, combining both county and district functions. Unitary authorities often cover large towns and cities as this is deemed to be more efficient than a two-tier structure. In addition, in small English counties such as Rutland and Herefordshire, the county council is a unitary authority, and has no districts. A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Rutland is traditionally Englands smallest county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire. ... Herefordshire is a traditional and ceremonial county and unitary district in the West Midlands region of England in the United Kingdom. ...


London boroughs

Main article: London borough

The London boroughs are sub-divisions of Greater London. They were established in 1965. Between 1965 and 1986 a two-tier structure of government existed in Greater London and the boroughs shared power with the Greater London Council (GLC). When the GLC was abolished in 1986 they gained similar status to the unitary authorities. In 2000 the Greater London Authority was established and a two-tier structure was restored, albeit with a change to the balance of powers and responsibilities. The administrative area of Greater London contains 32 London Boroughs, of which 12 (plus the City of London) make up Inner London and 20 Outer London. ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London and forms one of the nine regions of England. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... For more coverage on London, see the London Portal. ...


Trivia

Map of the Cambridgeshire area (1904) The city of Cambridge is an old English university town and the administrative centre of the county of Cambridgeshire. ... South Cambridgeshire is a mostly rural district of Cambridgeshire, England. ... For other uses, see Bath (disambiguation). ... Wansdyke is a dark ages defensive linear earthwork in the West Country of England. ... Scunthorpe (popularly known as Scunny) is the administrative centre of North Lincolnshire, England. ... Glanford was a borough of the English administrative county of Humberside from April 1, 1974 to April 1, 1996. ... Hereford Cathedral Hereford (pronounced hěr-ə-füd or hěr-i-füd) Welsh: Henffordd (pronounced Henforth) is a city in the west of England, close to the border with Wales and on the River Wye. ... Categories: Stub ... Stockton-on-Tees is a local government district and borough in north-east England, with a resident population in 2001 of 178,408 rising to 185,880 in 2005 estimates. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Tynedale is a local government district in south-west Northumberland. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ...

See also

This is a list of the metropolitan and non-metropolitan districts of England. ... This is a list of articles relating to local government in the United Kingdom and does not include specific entities or authorities: 1990s UK local government reform Administrative county Administrative counties of England Administrative counties of Scotland Ceremonial counties of England Civil parish Community County County borough County corporate County...

External links

  • The English Non-metropolitan Districts (Definition) Order 1972


Current structure of subnational entities in England (2006)
Region level: Region Region Region Region
County level: Metropolitan county Shire county Unitary authority Greater London
District level: Metropolitan district Shire district n/a London borough
Parish level: (Civil parish) (Civil parish) (Civil parish) n/a
Topics on England
History Anglo-Saxon England | Elizabethan era | Civil War | Jacobean era | Kingdom of England | Norman Conquest | English Reformation | English Renaissance | Tudor period | Union with Scotland | Wars of the Roses
Politics Government of England | Parliament of England
Geography Regions | Counties | Districts | Gardens | Islands | Places | Towns | Parishes
Economy Bank of England | London Stock Exchange
Demographics English English | Famous English people | English people
Culture Castles | Church of England | Education | English cricket team | The Football Association | Museums | English rugby team | Innovations & discoveries | St George's Day
Symbols National Flag | Royal Arms

  Results from FactBites:
 
ENGLAND - English Towns and English Villages (574 words)
This section of the British Towns and Villages Network is dedicated to the English and the counties of England, since is was designed to present the cities, towns and villages in the setting of their counties.
There is scarcely a county which does not exhibit startling changes of scene, of people and of occupation.
From the densely populated areas in the south east to the wilds of Dartmoor or the North Yorkshire Moors, the topographic desert of the Fens, the hills of central England and the mountains of Cumbria the country is a natural patchwork, one that is perhaps its greatest asset.
Districts of England information - Search.com (947 words)
The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government.
During the 1990s a further kind of district was created, the unitary authority, which combined the functions and status of county and district.
Metropolitan districts (or metropolitan boroughs) are a sub division of a metropolitan county.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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