FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Distant Early Warning Line
A rough map of the three warning lines

The Distant Early Warning Line, also known as the DEW Line or Early Warning Line, was a system of radar stations in the far northern Arctic region of Canada, with additional stations along the North Coast and Aleutian Islands of Alaska, in addition to Greenland and Iceland. It was set up to detect incoming Soviet bombers and missiles during the Cold War, a task which quickly became outdated when intercontinental ballistic missiles became the main delivery system for nuclear weapons. Download high resolution version (1048x1066, 204 KB)from [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1048x1066, 204 KB)from [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This long range radar antenna (approximately 40m (130ft) in diameter) rotates on a track to observe activities near the horizon. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border The Arctic is the area around the Earths North Pole. ... Looking down the Aleutians from an airplane. ... State nickname: The Last Frontier, The Land of the Midnight Sun Other U.S. States Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Governor Frank Murkowski Official languages English Area 1,717,854 km² (1st)  - Land 1,481,347 km²  - Water 236,507 km² (13. ... The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) (Russian: (СССР)  listen; tr. ... A bomber is a military aircraft designed to attack ground targets, primarily by dropping bombs. ... A missile (British English: miss-isle; U.S. English: missl) is, in general, a projectile—that is, something thrown or otherwise propelled. ... A cold war is a state of conflict between nations that does not involve direct military action but is pursued primarily through economic and political actions, acts of espionage or conflict through surrogates. ... A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ...


The DEW Line was the northernmost and most capable of three radar lines in Canada; the joint Canada/US Pinetree Line ran from Newfoundland to Vancouver Island, and the Mid-Canada Line ran somewhat north of this. A rough map of the three warning lines The Pinetree Line was a series of radar stations located across southern Canada at about the 50th parallel, along with a number of other stations located on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. ... Newfoundland (French: Terre-Neuve; Irish: Talamh an Éisc; Latin: Terra Nova) is a large island off the north-east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Vancouver Island is a large island in British Columbia, Canada, off the Pacific coast. ... A rough map of the three warning lines The Mid-Canada Line, also known as the McGill Fence, was a line of radar stations across the middle of Canada intended to provide early warning of a Soviet bomber attack on North America. ...


Improvements in Soviet technology made these two lines inadequate and on February 15, 1954, the Canadian and American governments agreed to jointly build a third line of radar stations, this time running across the high Arctic. The line would run roughly along the 69th parallel, 320 km north of the Arctic Circle. The Americans agreed to pay for the line using Canadian labour. The majority of Canadian DEW Line stations were the responsibility of the Royal Canadian Air Force (Canadian Armed Forces after 1968) although some manned facilities were jointly staffed with the U.S. Air Force. February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1954 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Arctic Circle - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The RCAF Roundel is based on that of the British Royal Air Force with a maple leaf, a symbol of Canada in the centre. ... Canadian Forces Flag The Canadian Armed Forces (Fr. ... Seal of the Air Force. ...


The massive construction project employed over 25,000 people. The line consisted of sixty-three stations stretching from Alaska to Baffin Island, covering almost 10,000 km. The project was finished in 1957 and was considered an engineering marvel. The next year, the line became a cornerstone of the new NORAD organization of joint continental air defence. State nickname: The Last Frontier, The Land of the Midnight Sun Other U.S. States Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Governor Frank Murkowski Official languages English Area 1,717,854 km² (1st)  - Land 1,481,347 km²  - Water 236,507 km² (13. ... Baffin Island (Inuktitut: Qikiqtaaluk ᕿᑭᖅᑖᓗᒃ) is one of the Canada in the territory of Nunavut. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... NORAD is short for: North American Aerospace Defense Command Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


There were three types of stations: small unmanned ones that were checked by aircrews only every few months during the summer; intermediate stations with only a chief, a chef, and a mechanic; and larger stations that had a variable number of employees and may have had libraries, movie projectors, and other distractions.


Quite quickly after its completion, the line lost much of its purpose. It was useless against ICBMs and submarine-launched attacks. A number of stations were decommissioned, but the bulk were retained to monitor potential Soviet air activities and to assert Canada's sovereignty in the Arctic. A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme authority over a geographic region, group of people, or ones self. ...


In 1985, the more capable DEW Line stations were upgraded and merged with newly-built stations into the North Warning System. Automation was increased and a number of additional stations were closed. In 1990, with the end of the Cold War and collapse of the Soviet Union, the Americans withdrew all their personnel and turned full operation of the Canadian stations over to Canada, while retaining responsibility for NWS stations located in Alaska and Greenland. 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The North Warning System (NWS) is a series of radar stations across Arctic North America. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A cold war is a state of conflict between nations that does not involve direct military action but is pursued primarily through economic and political actions, acts of espionage or conflict through surrogates. ... The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ...


A controversy also developed between the United States and Canada over the cleanup of deactivated DEW Line sites. The stations had produced large amounts of hazardous waste that had been abandoned in the high Arctic. Especially damaging were the large quantities of PCBs. The United States insisted that it was Canada's responsibility to pay the hundreds of millions in dollars of necessary cleanup, the Canadian government disagreed. In 1996, an agreement was reached that saw the Americans contribute $100 million to the estimated $300 million cleanup effort. Labelling transformers containing PCBs Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic compounds with 1 to 10 chlorine atoms are attached to biphenyl and a general structure of C12H10-xClx. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


See also:

This is a list of stations operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) from its creation in 1924 until unification into the Canadian Armed Forces on February 1, 1968. ...

External links

  • North American Radar (http://mysite.freeserve.com/nuclear_bunkers/radar.html)
  • The DEW Line sites in Canada, Alaska and Greenland (http://www.lswilson.ca/dewline.htm)
  • DEW Line in Cambridge Bay (http://www.cambridgebayhotel.com/dew-line-station-tours.htm)
  • yourYukon: Cleaning up the DEW Line (http://www.taiga.net/yourYukon/col152.html)
  • Canadian content - dew line doo doo? (http://www.canadiancontent.ca/issues/1298dewline.html)
  • FactsCanada - Feature (http://www.factscanada.ca/friday/friday-2000-07-10-06.shtml)
  • Defence Construction Canada (http://www.dcc-cdc.gc.ca/projects/dew-line_e.html)
  • Royal Military College of Canada DEW Line Cleanup Project - Environmental Sciences Group (http://www.rmc.ca/academic/gradrech/esg/dlcu_e.html)

  Results from FactBites:
 
NORAD (666 words)
Aerospace warning or integrated tactical warning and attack assessment (ITW/AA) covers the monitoring of man-made objects in space, and the detection, validation, and warning of attack against North America by aircraft, missiles, or space vehicles.
In the early 1950s they agreed to construct a series of radar stations across North America to face the threat of a Soviet attack over the pole.
By the early 1970s, the acceptance of MAD led to a cut in the air defense budget and the repositioning of NORAD's mission to ensuring the integrity of air space during peacetime.
DND/CF : Backgrounder : The Distant Early Warning Line Clean up Project (835 words)
From the early 1950s, isolated stations were constructed in Canada, Alaska and Greenland to identify unfriendly aircraft and to direct the fighter planes that would intercept them.
The Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line of radar sites across the Arctic coastline was established in the late 1950s and consisted of sites along the 66th parallel from northwestern Alaska to eastern Baffin Island.
In the early 1960s, 21 of these sites were decommissioned and became the responsibility of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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