FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Display resolution
Display standards comparison
Display standards comparison

The display resolution of a digital television or computer display typically refers to the number of distinct pixels in each dimension that can be displayed. It can be an ambiguous term especially as the displayed resolution is controlled by different factors in cathode ray tube (CRT) and flat panel or projection displays using fixed picture-element (pixel) arrays. Image File history File links Video_Standards. ... Image File history File links Video_Standards. ... Digital television (DTV) is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound by means of digital signals, in contrast to analog signals used by analog (traditional) TV. DTV uses digital modulation data, which is digitally compressed and requires decoding by a specially designed television set, or a... A computer display monitor, usually called simply a monitor when the meaning is clear from the context, is a piece of electrical equipment which displays viewable images generated by a computer without producing a permanent record. ... Cathode ray tube employing electromagnetic focus and deflection Cutaway rendering of a color CRT Electron guns Electron beams Focusing coils Deflection coils Anode connection Mask for separating beams for red, green, and blue part of displayed image Phosphor layer with red, green, and blue zones Close-up of the phosphor... This example shows an image with a portion greatly enlarged, in which the individual pixels are rendered as little squares and can easily be seen. ...


One use of the term "display resolution" applies to fixed-pixel-array displays such as flat-panel plasmas (PDPs), liquid crystal displays (LCDs), front and rear projectors using LCD, DLP (Digital Light Processing), or similar technologies and is simply the physical number of columns and rows of pixels creating the display (e.g., 800×600; 1024×768, etc.). A consequence of having a fixed grid display is that for multiformat video inputs all displays need a "scaling-engine" (a digital video processor that includes a memory array) to match the incoming picture format to the display. The plasma display panel was invented at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign by Donald L. Bitzer, H. Gene Slottow, and graduate student Robert Willson in 1964 for the PLATO Computer System. ... Reflective twisted nematic liquid crystal display. ... The DLP Logo Digital Light Processing (DLP) is a technology used in projectors and video projectors. ...


Some commentators also use this term to indicate a range of input formats that the display's input electronics will accept and often include formats greater than the screen's native grid size even though they have to be down-scaled to match the screen's parameters (e.g. accepting a 1920×1080 input on a display with a native 1366×768 pixel array). In the case of television inputs, many manufacturers will take the input and zoom it out to "overscan" the display by as much as 5% so input resolution is not necessarily display resolution.


The eye's perception of "display resolution" can be affected by a number of factors—see Image resolution and Optical resolution. One factor is the display screen's rectangular shape, which is expressed as the ratio of the physical picture width to the picture height. This is known as the aspect ratio. A screen's physical aspect ratio and the individual pixels' aspect ratio may not necessarily be the same. An array of 1280×720 on a 16:9 display has square pixels. An array of 1024×768 on a 16:9 display has rectangular pixels. Image resolution describes the detail an image holds. ... Resolving power is the ability of a microscope or telescope to measure the angular separation of images that are close together. ... The aspect ratio of an image is its displayed width divided by its height (usually expressed as x:y or x×y, with the joining colon or multiplication symbol articulated as the preposition by or sometimes to). Currently, the most popular standard ratios are the anamorphic (2. ...


An example of pixel shape affecting "resolution" or perceived sharpness: displaying more information in a smaller area using a higher resolution makes the image much clearer. However, newer LCD displays and such are fixed at a certain resolution; making the resolution lower on these kinds of screens will greatly decrease sharpness, as an interpolation process is used to "fix" the non-native resolution input into the displays native resolution output.


While some CRT-based displays may use digital video processing that involves image scaling using memory arrays, ultimately "display resolution" in CRT-type displays is affected by different parameters such as spot size and focus, astigmatic effects in the display corners, the color phosphor pitch shadow mask (such as Trinitron) in color displays, and the video bandwidth. Video processing techniques are used in video codecs, video players and other devices. ... In optics, astigmatism is when an optical system has different foci for rays that propagate in two perpendicular planes. ... The shadow mask is one of two major technologies used to manufacture cathode ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer displays that produce color images (the other is aperture grille). ... Picture of a Dell-branded Sony Trinitron, still bearing the Trinitron logo. ...

Contents

Overview

Analog television systems use interlace scanning with two sequential scans (50 or 60 fields per second), one with the odd numbered lines, the other with the even numbered lines to give a complete picture (25 or 30 frames per second). This is done to save transmission bandwidth but a consequence is that in picture tube (CRT) displays, the full vertical resolution cannot be realized. For example, the maximum detail in the vertical direction would be for adjacent lines to be alternately black then white. This is not a problem in a progressive display but an interlace display will have an unacceptable flicker or twitter at the slower frame rate. This is why interlace is unacceptable for fine detail such as computer word processing or spreadsheets. For television it means that if the picture is intended for interlace displays the picture must be vertically filtered to remove this objectionable flicker with a reduction of vertical resolution to about 70%. So a 576 line PAL interlace display only has about 400 lines vertical resolution and 350 in the case of a 486 line NTSC interlace display (486i visible out of 525 lines). Similarly, 1080i HD interlaced video would need to be filtered to about 700 lines for an interlaced display. Any interlaced broadcast television pictures and for that matter DVDs are filtered to that vertical resolution to reduce the interline twitter on fine detail. Analog television (or analogue television) encodes television and transports the picture and sound information as an analog signal, that is, by varying the amplitude and/or frequencies of the broadcast signal. ...


Fixed pixel array displays such as LCDs, plasmas, DLPs, LCoS, etc. need a "scaling" processor with frame memory, which, depending on the processing system, effectively converts an incoming interlaced picture into progressive. A similar process occurs in a PC and its display with interlaced video (e.g. from a TV tuner card). The downside is that interlace motion artifacts are almost impossible to remove resulting in horizontal "toothed" edges on moving objects.


Also in analog connected picture displays such as CRT TV sets, the horizontal scanlines are not divided into pixels, and therefore the horizontal resolution is related to the bandwidth of the luminance and chroma signals. For television, the analog bandwidth for luminance in standard definition should be flat to 5 MHz and in high definition, about 30/31 MHz. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... As applied to analog television signals, two different words are used, luminance and luma, meaning two different things. ...


Current standards in resolution

Currently 1024×768 (XGA/XVGA, eXtended), 1280×1024 (SXGA Super eXtended Graphics Array), and 1600×1200 resolution (UXGA, Ultra-eXtended) are the most common display resolutions[citation needed]. Many computer users including CAD users, graphic artists and video game players run their computers at 1600×1200 resolution (UXGA, Ultra-eXtended) or higher if they have the necessary equipment—although 1280×1024 (SXGA Super eXtended Graphics Array) is more widespread as it is the optimum resolution of most 19" monitors. When a computer display resolution is set higher than the physical screen resolution, some video drivers make the virtual screen scrollable over the physical screen. Some CRT monitors will accept higher resolutions than their specified native resolution. The true maximum resolution is calculated from the dot pitch. Few CRT manufacturers will quote the true native resolution in their documentation, but most LCD manufacturers do. With digital television and HDTV, vertical resolutions of 720 or 1080 scan lines are typical. XGA, the eXtended Graphics Array, is an IBM display standard introduced in 1990. ... Various computer display standards or display modes have been used in the history of the personal computer. ... SXGA is an abbreviation for Super eXtended Graphics Array referring to a standard monitor resolution of 1280 × 1024 pixels. ... UXGA is an abbreviation for Ultra eXtended Graphics Accelerator referring to a standard monitor resolution of 1600 × 1200 pixels, which is exactly quadruple the default resolution of SVGA (800 × 600). ... CAD is a TLA that may stand for: Cadiz Railroad (AAR reporting mark CAD) Canadian dollar – ISO 4217-code Capital Adequacy Directive Card Acceptance Device Children of the Anachronistic Dynasty Computer-aided design Computer-aided detection (medical) Computer-aided diagnosis (medical) Computer-assisted dispatch Computer-assisted drafting Coronary artery disease... UXGA is an abbreviation for Ultra eXtended Graphics Accelerator referring to a standard monitor resolution of 1600 × 1200 pixels, which is exactly quadruple the default resolution of SVGA (800 × 600). ... SXGA is an abbreviation for Super eXtended Graphics Array referring to a standard monitor resolution of 1280 × 1024 pixels. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Liquid crystal display. ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ... A scanline is a line on a CRT tube, made up of dots. ...


Overscan/underscan

Most television display manufacturers "overscan" the pictures on their displays (CRTs and PDPs, LCDs etc.), so that the effective on-screen picture may be reduced from 720×576(480) to 680×550(450), for example. The size of the invisible area somewhat depends on the display device. HD televisions do this as well to a similar extent.


Computer displays including projectors generally do not overscan although many models (particularly CRT displays) allow it. In computer displays, overscan and underscan can be altered by adjusting vertical blanking interval. CRT displays tend to be underscanned in stock configurations, to compensate the increasing distortions at the corners. On LCD and other flat panel displays, VBI can be lowered to support higher resolutions and refresh rate for the same bandwidth. The vertical blanking interval (VBI) is an interval in a television or VDU signal that temporarily suspends transmission of the signal for the electron gun to move back up to the first line of the television screen to trace the next screen field. ...


Evolution of resolution standards

Many personal computers introduced in the late 1970s and the 1980s were designed to use television sets as their display devices, making the resolutions dependent on the television standards in use, including PAL and NTSC. Picture sizes were usually limited in order to ensure the visibility of all the pixels in the major television standards and the broad range of television sets with varying amounts of overscan. The actual drawable picture area was therefore somewhat smaller than the whole screen, and was usually surrounded by a static-colored border. Also, the interlace scanning was usually omitted in order to provide more stability to the picture, effectively halving the vertical resolution in progress. 320×200 and 640×200 on NTSC and 320×256 and 640×256 on PAL were relatively common resolutions in the era. In the PC world, these resolutions came to be used by the Color Graphics Adapter. Television encoding systems by nation. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The Color Graphics Adapter (CGA), introduced in 1981, was IBMs first color graphics card, and the first color computer display standard for the IBM PC. The standard IBM CGA graphics card was equipped with 16 kilobytes of video memory. ...


The 640×480 resolution, introduced with the IBM PS/2 VGA and MCGA (multi-color) on-board graphics chips, was the standard resolution in the IBM PC compatibles from 1990 to around 1996, partly due to its 4:3 ratio. 800×600 was the standard resolution until around 2000. Since then, 1024×768 has been the standard resolution. Many web sites and multimedia products are designed for this resolution.[citation needed] Most of today's computer games, do not support 640×480 at all. Microsoft Windows XP is designed to run at 800×600 minimum although it is possible to select 640×480 in the Advanced Settings Window, and an application is also able to switch to any desired mode. GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and most Unix variants use the X Window System and can run at any desired resolution as long as the display and video card support it. Apple's Mac OS and Mac OS X operating systems are able to run with most available display resolutions; although it is possible to select 640×480 resolution, 800×600 is Apple's recommended minimum. This article is about the Personal System/2 computer line made by IBM. There is another article on the PlayStation 2 made by Sony. ... Multicolor Graphics Adapter (MCGA) was the IBM name for what would later become part of the generic Video Graphics Array (VGA) standard. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 4:3 is a ratio. ... Windows XP is a line of proprietary operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on general-purpose computer systems, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, and media centers. ... Unix systems filiation. ... FreeBSD is a Unix-like free operating system descended from AT&T UNIX via the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) branch through the 386BSD and 4. ... Filiation of Unix and Unix-like systems Unix (officially trademarked as UNIX®) is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy. ... KDE 3. ... Nixie tubes, LED-display and VF-display A display device, also known as an information display is a device for visual or tactile presentation of images (including text) acquired, stored, or transmitted in various forms. ... A video card, (also referred to as a graphics accelerator card, display adapter, graphics card, and numerous other terms), is an item of personal computer hardware whose function is to generate and output images to a display. ... Apple Inc. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ...


Common display resolutions

Computer graphics

Computer Standard Resolution Display Aspect Ratio Pixels
VIC-II multicolor, IBM PCjr 16-color 160×200 4:5 32,000
Acorn BBC 20 column modes 160×256 5:8 40,960
TMS9918, ZX Spectrum 256×192 4:3 49,152
Apple II HiRes 280×192 35:24 53,760
Atari 400/800 320×192 5:3 61,440
CGA 4-color, Atari ST 16 color, VIC-II HiRes, Amiga OCS NTSC LowRes 320×200 8:5 64,000
QVGA 320×240 4:3 76,800
Acorn BBC 40 column modes 320×256 5:4 76,800
Amiga OCS PAL LowRes 320×256 5:4 76,800
WQVGA 432×240 9:5 103,680
HVGA 480×320 3:2 153,200
Black & white Macintosh (9") 512×342 3:2 175,104
Macintosh LC (12")/Color Classic 512×384 4:3 196,608
Atari ST 4 color, CGA mono, Amiga OCS NTSC HiRes 640×200 16:5 128,000
Acorn BBC 80 column modes 640×256 5:2 163,840
Amiga OCS PAL HiRes 640×256 5:2 163,840
EGA 640×350 64:35 (approx. 9:5) 224,000
Atari ST mono, Amiga OCS NTSC interlaced 640×400 8:5 256,000
VGA and MCGA 640×480 4:3 307,200
Amiga OCS PAL interlaced 640×512 5:4 327,680
HGC 720×348 60:29 (approx. 2:1) 250,560
MDA 720×350 72:35 (approx. 2:1) 252,000
Apple Lisa 720×360 2:1 259,200
WGA or WVGA 800×480 5:3 384,000
SVGA 800×600 4:3 480,000
Apple Macintosh 832×624 4:3 519,168
XGA 1024×768 4:3 786,432
NeXTcube 1120×832 35:26 (approx. 4:3) 931,840
XGA+ 1152×864 4:3 995,328
Sun 1152×900 32:25 (approx. 4:3) 1,036,800
WXGA1 1280×800 16:10 1,024,000
Apple PowerBook G4 1280×854 640:427 (approx. 3:2) 1,093,120
SXGA 1280×1024 5:4 1,310,720
WXGA2 1366×768 16:9 1,049,088
WSXGA or WXGA+ 1440×900 16:10 1,296,000
SXGA+ 1400×1050 4:3 1,470,000
WSXGA 1600×1024 25:16 1,638,400
UXGA 1600×1200 4:3 1,920,000
UXGA 1600x1400 4:3 2,240,000
WSXGA+ 1680×1050 16:10 1,764,000
WUXGA 1920×1200 16:10 2,304,000
QXGA 2048×1536 4:3 3,145,728
WQXGA 2560×1600 16:10 4,096,000
QSXGA 2560×2048 5:4 5,242,880
QSXGA+ 2800×2100 4:3 5,880,000
WQSXGA 3200×2048 25:16 6,553,600
QUXGA 3200×2400 4:3 7,680,000
WQUXGA 3840×2400 16:10 9,216,000
Sony 4K 4096×2160 1.85:1 8,847,360
HSXGA 5120×4096 5:4 20,971,520
WHSXGA 6400×4096 25:16 26,214,400
HUXGA 6400×4800 4:3 30,720,000
WHUXGA 7680×4800 16:10 36,864,000

Note 1: WXGA defines a range of resolutions with widths of 1280 to 1366 pixels and heights of 720 to 800 pixels. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Display resolution. ... The VIC-II (Video Interface Chip II), specifically known as the MOS Technology 6567/8562/8564 (NTSC versions), 6569/8565/8566 (PAL), is the integrated circuit chip tasked with generating composite video graphics and DRAM refresh signals in the Commodore 64 and C128 home computers. ... The IBM PCjr (read PC junior) was IBMs first attempt to enter the market for relatively inexpensive educational and home-use personal computers. ... The BBC Microcomputer System was a series of microcomputers and associated peripherals designed and built by Acorn Computers Ltd for the BBC Computer Literacy Project operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The ZX Spectrum is a home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... An Atari 800XL, one of the most popular machines in the series. ... The Color Graphics Adapter (CGA), introduced in 1981, was IBMs first color graphics card, and the first color computer display standard for the IBM PC. The standard IBM CGA graphics card was equipped with 16 kilobytes of video memory. ... The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ... The VIC-II (Video Interface Chip II), specifically known as the MOS Technology 6567/8562/8564 (NTSC versions), 6569/8565/8566 (PAL), is the integrated circuit chip tasked with generating composite video graphics and DRAM refresh signals in the Commodore 64 and C128 home computers. ... The Original Chip Set (OCS) was a chipset used in the earliest Commodore Amiga computers. ... The Quarter Video Graphics Array (also known as Quarter VGA or QVGA) is a popular term for a computer display with 320x240 resolution. ... The BBC Microcomputer System was a series of microcomputers and associated peripherals designed and built by Acorn Computers Ltd for the BBC Computer Literacy Project operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... The Original Chip Set (OCS) was a chipset used in the earliest Commodore Amiga computers. ... HVGA (Half-size Video Graphics Array) screens have 480x320 pixels (3:2 aspect ratio). ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... Macintosh LC sans display, keyboard or mouse The Macintosh LC (meaning low-cost color) was Apple Computers product family of low-end consumer Macintosh personal computers in the early 1990s. ... The Macintosh Color Classic was the first color all-in-one Apple Macintosh computer. ... The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ... The Color Graphics Adapter (CGA), introduced in 1981, was IBMs first color graphics card, and the first color computer display standard for the IBM PC. The standard IBM CGA graphics card was equipped with 16 kilobytes of video memory. ... The Original Chip Set (OCS) was a chipset used in the earliest Commodore Amiga computers. ... The BBC Microcomputer System was a series of microcomputers and associated peripherals designed and built by Acorn Computers Ltd for the BBC Computer Literacy Project operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... The Original Chip Set (OCS) was a chipset used in the earliest Commodore Amiga computers. ... The Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA) is the IBM PC computer display standard specification located between CGA and VGA in terms of graphics performance (that is, colour and space resolution). ... The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ... The Original Chip Set (OCS) was a chipset used in the earliest Commodore Amiga computers. ... Video Graphics Array (VGA) is a computer display standard first marketed in 1987 by IBM. VGA belongs to a family of earlier IBM video standards and largely remains backward compatible with them. ... Multicolor Graphics Adapter (MCGA) was the IBM name for what would later become part of the generic Video Graphics Array (VGA) standard. ... The Original Chip Set (OCS) was a chipset used in the earliest Commodore Amiga computers. ... The Hercules Graphics Card (HGC) was a mid-1980s computer graphics controller which through its popularity became a de-facto display standard. ... Green screen driven by a Monochrome Display Adapter The Monochrome Display Adapter (MDA, also MDA card, Monochrome Display and Printer Adapter, MDPA) introduced in 1981 was IBMs standard video display card and computer display standard for the PC. The MDA did not have any graphics mode of any kind... The Apple Lisa was a revolutionary personal computer designed at Apple Computer during the early 1980s. ... WGA is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: Writers Guild of America Williams Gateway Airport - an acronym for the airport in Mesa, Arizona Windows Genuine Advantage A kind of Display resolution Whole genome amplification Wheat germ agglutinin - a lectin (protein that binds certain sugars) Category: ... Video Graphics Array (VGA) is an analog computer display standard first marketed in 1987 by IBM. While it has been obsolete for some time except in the pocket pc market where it is becoming the new standard, it was the last graphical standard that the majority of manufacturers decided to... Super Video Graphics Array, almost always abbreviated to Super VGA or just SVGA is a broad term that covers a wide range of computer display standards. ... The Macintosh 128K, the first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac The Macintosh (commonly known as Mac) is a range of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Inc. ... XGA, the eXtended Graphics Array, is an IBM display standard introduced in 1990. ... Look up Next in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... XGA+ stands for eXtended Graphics Array Plus and is a computer display standard. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... Wide XGA (WXGA) is a display standard that supports a max resolution of 1280 horizontal pixels by 768 vertical pixels. ... The PowerBook G4 is a series of notebook computers that was manufactured, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... SXGA is an abbreviation for Super eXtended Graphics Array referring to a standard monitor resolution of 1280 × 1024 pixels. ... Wide XGA (WXGA) is a display standard that supports a max resolution of 1280 horizontal pixels by 768 vertical pixels. ... A screen resolution of 1440×900 is best described as WSXGA or WXGA+. It has an aspect ratio of 16:10/8:5 (widescreen) and a resolution falling between that of WXGA and WSXGA+, and can thus be thought of as either being an enhanced WXGA (e. ... SXGA+ stands for Super eXtended Graphics Array and is a computer display standard. ... SXGA+ stands for Super eXtended Graphics Array and is a computer display standard. ... UXGA is an abbreviation for Ultra eXtended Graphics Accelerator referring to a standard monitor resolution of 1600 × 1200 pixels, which is exactly quadruple the default resolution of SVGA (800 × 600). ... UXGA is an abbreviation for Ultra eXtended Graphics Accelerator referring to a standard monitor resolution of 1600 × 1200 pixels, which is exactly quadruple the default resolution of SVGA (800 × 600). ... WSXGA+ stands for Widescreen Super eXtended Graphics Array and is a computer display standard. ... WUXGA stands for Widescreen Ultra eXtended Graphics Array and is a display resolution of 1920×1200 pixels with a 16:10 screen aspect ratio. ... The QXGA display standard and its derivatives are relatively new (as of 2005) resolution standards in display technology. ... WQXGA (Wide Quad eXtended Graphics Array) is a display resolution of 2560×1600 pixels with a 16:10 aspect ratio. ... QSXGA (Quad Super eXtended Graphics Array) is a display resolution of roughly 2560×2048 pixels with a 5:4 aspect ratio. ... The QXGA display standard and its derivatives are relatively new (as of 2005) resolution standards in display technology. ... An acronym for Quad Ultra Extended Graphics Array, it describes a display standard that can support a resolution up to 3840 x 2400 pixels, assuming a 1:33:1 aspect ratio. ... The QXGA display standard and its derivatives are a relatively new (as of 2005) standard in display technology. ... The HXGA display standard and its derivatives are a relatively new (as of 2005) standard in display technology. ... The HXGA display standard and its derivatives are a relatively new (as of 2005) standard in display technology. ... The HXGA display standard and its derivatives are a relatively new (as of 2005) standard in display technology. ... The HXGA display standard and its derivatives are a relatively new (as of 2005) standard in display technology. ... Wide XGA (WXGA) is a display standard that supports a max resolution of 1280 horizontal pixels by 768 vertical pixels. ...


Note 2: LCD panels’ resolutions are often quoted in terms of raw subpixels misnamed “pixels” in manufacturer’s specifications. Each real pixel includes one subpixel for each of three colors, so calling subpixels “pixels” inflates the claimed resolution by a factor of three. This bit of disingenuous obfuscation is calculated as horizontal resolution × 3 × vertical resolution. For example: 640×480 VGA is 921600 “pixels”, or 307200 pixels, 800×600 SVGA is 1440000 “pixels”, or 480000 pixels, and 1024×768 XGA is 2359296 “pixels”, but only 786432 real pixels.

Television/movies

Analog TV standard Resolution Display aspect ratio Pixels
PAL, SECAM ~350 × 576 lines 4:3 ~201,600
PALplus ~350 × 576 lines 16:9 ~201,600
Undecoded PALplus ~350 × 432 lines 16:9 ~151,200
NTSC ~270 × 486 lines 4:3 ~129,600
Laserdisc ~460 × 480 (NTSC) 4:3 ~268,800
~560 × 576 (PAL/SECAM) ~322,560
Betamax ~250 (285 in SuperBeta) × 480 (NTSC) 4:3 ~120,000 (~136,800)
~250 (285 in SuperBeta) × 576 (PAL/SECAM) ~144,000 (~164,160)
VHS ~240 × 480 (NTSC) 4:3 ~115,200
~240 × 576 (PAL/SECAM) ~138,240
S-VHS ~400 × 480 (NTSC) 4:3 ~192,000
~400 × 576 (PAL/SECAM) ~230,400

~ = horizontal resolution is an approximation Television encoding systems by nation. ... SECAM, also written SÉCAM (Séquentiel couleur à mémoire, French for Sequential Color with Memory), is an analog color television system first used in France. ... PALplus is an extension of the PAL analogue broadcasting system for transmitting 16:9 programs without sacrificing vertical resolution. ... PALplus is an extension of the PAL analogue broadcasting system for transmitting 16:9 programs without sacrificing vertical resolution. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sonys Betamax is the 12. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS is a recording and playing standard for analog video cassette recorders (VCRs), developed by Victor Company of Japan, Limited (JVC) and launched... Introduced in Japan in 1987, S-VHS (Super VHS) was an improved version of the VHS standard for consumer video cassette recorders. ...

Digital TV standard Resolution Display aspect ratio Pixels
Video CD 352 × 240 (NTSC) 4:3 (non-square pixels) 84,480
352 × 288 (PAL) 101,376
UMD 480 × 272 ~16:9 130,560
China Video Disc 352 × 480 (NTSC) 4:3 (non-square pixels) 168,960
352 × 576 (PAL) 202,725
SVCD 480 × 480 (NTSC) 4:3 (non-square pixels) 230,400
480 × 576 (PAL) 276,480
SDTV 480i, EDTV 480p 640 × 480 4:3 or 16:9 307,200
704 × 480 337,920
852 × 480 408,960
DVD 720 × 480 (NTSC) 4:3 or 16:9 (non-square pixels) 345,600
720 × 576 (PAL) 414,720
HDTV, HD DVD, Blu-ray 720p 1280 × 720 16:9 921,600
HDTV, HD DVD, Blu-ray 1080p, 1080i 1920 × 1080 16:9 2,073,600
Digital film standard Resolution Display aspect ratio Pixels
Academy 4K 3656 × 2664 1.37:1 9,739,584
Digital cinema 4K 4096 × 1714 2.39:1 7,020,544
3996 × 2160 1.85:1 8,631,360
Academy 2K 1828 × 1332 1.37:1 2,434,896
Digital Cinema 2K 2048 × 858 2.39:1 1,757,184
1998 × 1080 1.85:1 2,157,840
Digital video resolutions
Designation Usage examples Definition (lines) Rate (Hz)
Interlaced (fields) Progressive (frames)
Low; MP@LL LDTV, VCD 240; 288 (SIF) 24, 30; 25
Standard; MP@ML SDTV, SVCD, DVD, DV 480 (NTSC, PAL-M) 60 24, 30
576 (PAL, SECAM) 50 25
Enhanced EDTV 480; 576 60; 50
High; MP@HL HDTV, HD DVD, Blu-ray Disc, HDV 720 24, 30, 60; 25, 50
1080 50, 60 24, 30; 25
This table illustrates total horizontal and vertical pixel resolution via box size. It does not accurately reflect the screen shape (aspect ratio) of these formats, which is either 4:3 or 16:9.

Video CD (aka VCD, VideoCD, View CD, Compact Disc digital video) is a standard digital format for storing video on a Compact Disc. ... A UMD The Universal Media Disc (UMD) is an optical disc medium developed by Sony for use on the PlayStation Portable. ... The China Video Disc (CVD), developed in the late 1990s, is a Chinese government-sponsored competitor to the SVCD standard. ... Super Video Compact Disc (SVCD) is a format used for storing video on standard compact discs or CD-Rs. ... ... 480i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... EDtv is a movie directed by Ron Howard released in 1999. ... 480p is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... DVD (Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ... HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data... Blu-ray discs Blu-ray Disc is a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by a group of leading consumer electronics and PC companies called the Blu_ray Disc Association (BDA), which succeeds the Blu_ray Disc Founders (BDF). ... JOHN HERMAN SUCKS FAT DICK ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ... HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data... Blu-ray discs Blu-ray Disc is a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by a group of leading consumer electronics and PC companies called the Blu_ray Disc Association (BDA), which succeeds the Blu_ray Disc Founders (BDF). ... 1080p is a format of high definition broadcast. ... 1080i is shorthand name for a category of video modes. ... ... This article is about digital presentation. ... For the method of incrementally displaying raster graphics, see Interlace (bitmaps). ... Progressive scan Progressive or noninterlaced scanning is any method for displaying, storing or transmitting moving images in which the lines of each frame are drawn in sequence. ... MPEG-2 is a standard for the generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information [1]. It is widely used around the world to specify the format of the digital television signals that are broadcast by terrestrial (over-the-air), cable, and direct broadcast satellite TV systems. ... Low-definition television or LDTV refers to television systems that have a lower resolution than Standard Definition Television systems. ... Video CD (aka VCD, VideoCD, View CD, Compact Disc digital video) is a standard digital format for storing video on a Compact Disc. ... An acronym for Standard Input Format, this video format was developed to allow the storage and transmission of digital video. ... ... ... ... Standard-definition television or SDTV refers to television systems that have a lower resolution than HDTV systems. ... Compact Disc Super Video (SVCD) logo/trademark Super Video CD (Super Video Compact Disc or SVCD) is a format used for storing video on standard compact discs. ... DVD (Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... A MiniDV Camcorder For other uses, see DV (disambiguation). ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... PAL-M is the TV system used in Brazil. ... 480i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... 480p is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... Television encoding systems by nation. ... SECAM, also written SÉCAM (Séquentiel couleur à mémoire, French for Sequential Color with Memory), is an analog color television system first used in France. ... 576i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... 576p is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... Enhanced-definition television, extended-definition television, or EDTV is a CEA marketing shorthand term for certain digital television (DTV) formats. ... 480p is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... 576p is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ... HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data... A Blu-ray Disc (also called BD) is a high-density optical disc format for the storage of digital media, including high-definition video. ... High Definition Video (HDV) is a video format designed to record compressed HDTV video on standard DV media (DV or MiniDV cassette tape). ... JOHN HERMAN SUCKS FAT DICK ... 1080i is shorthand name for a category of video modes. ... 1080p is a format of high definition broadcast. ... Image File history File links Common_Video_Resolutions. ...

See also

Various computer display standards or display modes have been used in the history of the personal computer. ... Resolution independence in Mac OS X Tiger in iWeb. ... The square shown above is 200 pixels by 200 pixels. ...

External links

References

  • Sony SXRD 4K Projector (SRXR110) resolution retrieved from [1]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Display Resolution Manager - Share your display, brightness and contrast settings (498 words)
Display Resolution Manager is simple, yet much needed computer utility that allows each user to set preferred screen resolution.
Instead, the resolution will be set lower and people with bad eye-sight will see large icons on their display.
One of the important features of Display Resolution Manager is that it is capable of managing screen resolution for multiple monitors.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m