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Encyclopedia > Discworld
Cover of an early edition of The Colour of Magic; art by Josh Kirby

Discworld is a comedic fantasy book series by the British author Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld, a flat world balanced on the backs of four elephants which are in turn standing on the back of a giant turtle, Great A'Tuin. The books frequently parody or at least borrow ideas from J. R. R. Tolkien, Robert E. Howard, H. P. Lovecraft and William Shakespeare, as well as myth, folklore and fairy tales, often using them for satirical parallels with current cultural, technological and scientific issues. The Discworld is the fictional setting for all of Terry Pratchetts Discworld fantasy novels. ... The Discworld is a series of over 30 novels by Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (470x800, 298 KB)The Colour of Magic cover, from http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (470x800, 298 KB)The Colour of Magic cover, from http://www. ... The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... Ronald William Josh Kirby (27 November 1928–23 October 2001), was a British commercial artist born in Waterloo, Lancashire and educated at the Liverpool City School of Art, where he acquired the nickname Josh. ... Comedy is the use of humour in the performing arts. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... A book series is a sequence of books with common characteristics, typically written by the same author, or marketed as a group by their publisher. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... The Discworld is the fictional setting for all of Terry Pratchetts Discworld fantasy novels. ... For the 1984 album by Thomas Dolby, see The Flat Earth. ... The Discworld is the fictional setting for all of Terry Pratchetts Discworld fantasy novels. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936)[1] was a classic American pulp writer of fantasy, horror, historical adventure, boxing, western, and detective fiction. ... This article is about the author. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ...


Since the first novel, The Colour of Magic (1983), the series has expanded, spawning several related books and maps, four short stories, cartoon and theatre adaptations, and even music inspired by the series. The first live-action screen adaptation for television (Terry Pratchett's Hogfather) was broadcast over Christmas 2006. Another one for the cinema (The Wee Free Men) is currently in development. The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... See also: 1982 in literature, other events of 1983, 1984 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Terry Pratchetts Hogfather is a two-part television adaptation of the book of the same name by Terry Pratchett, produced by The Mob, and broadcast on Sky One, and in High Definition on Sky One HD, over Christmas 2006. ... For The Wee Free, see the Free Church of Scotland. ...


Newly released Discworld books regularly top The Sunday Times bestsellers list, making Pratchett the UK's best-selling author in the 1990s. He has since been overtaken by Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling. Discworld novels have also won awards such as the Prometheus Award and the Carnegie Medal. In the BBC's Big Read, five Discworld books were in the top 100, and a total of fifteen in the top 200. The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... The Prometheus Award is an award for libertarian science fiction novels given out annually by the Libertarian Futurist Society (which also publishes a quarterly journal, Prometheus). ... The Carnegie Medal in Literature was established in the UK in 1936 in honour of Scottish philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The Big Read was a 2003 survey carried out by the BBC, with the goal of finding the Nations Best-loved Book by way of a viewer vote via the Web, SMS and telephone. ...

Contents

Writings

Pratchett has developed the Discworld in a series of novels, short stories, and other works.


Novels

As of 2007 there have been 36 Discworld novels published (four of which are marketed as children's or "young adult" (YA) books). The original British editions of the first 26 novels, up to Thief of Time (2001), had distinctive cover art by Josh Kirby; the American editions by HarperCollins used their own cover art. Since Kirby's death in October 2001 the covers have been designed by Paul Kidby. Recent British editions of Pratchett's older novels no longer re-use Kirby's art. 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thief of Time is the 26th Discworld novel written by Terry Pratchett. ... Ronald William Josh Kirby (27 November 1928–23 October 2001), was a British commercial artist born in Waterloo, Lancashire and educated at the Liverpool City School of Art, where he acquired the nickname Josh. ... Kidbys cover of The Science of Discworld, which is a parody of the painting An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump by Joseph Wright. ...


Very few of the Discworld novels have chapter divisions, and feature interweaving storylines instead. Pratchett is often quoted that he "just never got into the habit of chapters",[1] adding later "I have to shove them in the putative YA [young adult] books because my editor screams until I do".[2] However, the first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, was divided into "books", as is Pyramids. However, Going Postal and Making Money do have chapters, including both a prologue and an epilogue along with brief teasers of what was to come in each chapter in the style of A. A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh stories or the novels of Jules Verne and Jerome K. Jerome. The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... Pyramids is the seventh Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1989. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, Oklahoma. ... For the actual making of money, see Mint for the making of coins and Banknote concerning the production of paper money. ... Alan Alexander Milne (IPA pronunciation: ) (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various childrens poems. ... Winnie the Pooh Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... This article is about the French author. ... Jerome Klapka Jerome (May 2, 1859 – June 14, 1927) was an English author, best known for the humorous travelogue Three Men in a Boat. ...


Reading orders

Many novels share the same lead characters and show their development over time. Some of the main characters of one book may also make a cameo appearance in another book where they are not the primary focus; for example, Carrot Ironfoundersson and Angua von Überwald appear briefly in Going Postal. The books take place roughly in real-time, and the characters' ages change to reflect the passing of years. The novels can be grouped into several story arcs, with characters or themes in common, however no distinction will ever be clear-cut. Many stories (such as The Truth and Thief of Time) nominally stand alone but nonetheless tie in heavily with main storylines. A number of characters, such as the Unseen University staff, Lord Vetinari, the Monks of History and the Elves, appear prominently in many different storylines without having titles of their own. As it is, many of these 'standalone' stories deal with the development of the city of Ankh-Morpork into a techno-magically advanced metropolis, that readers will find analogous to real-world cities. For example, The Truth catalogues the rise of a newspaper service for the city, the Ankh-Morpork Times, and Going Postal similarly deals with the development of a post service and the rise of the Discworld's telecommunications system called 'the clacks'. With the main character of Going Postal starring in the similarly-themed Making Money in which he takes over the Ankh-Morpork Mint, it can be considered a new arc: the Moist von Lipwig stories. Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series contains over 30 novels, but they are not all dedicated to a single story arc. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ...  Carrot Ironfoundersson is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... Delphine Angua von Ãœberwald is a character from the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ... Real-time is a term used to describe a motion picture, television or radio program, or computer game wherein the events depicted take place entirely within the span of time that lasts from the beginning of the depiction to the end, and at the same rate. ... This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ... Thief of Time is the 26th Discworld novel written by Terry Pratchett. ... Unseen University (UU) is a school of wizardry in the fictional Discworld city of Ankh-Morpork, staffed by a faculty composed of mostly indolent and inept old wizards. ... Ankh-Morpork is a fictional city-state which prominently features in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 A metropolis (in Greek μήτηρ, mÄ“tÄ“r = mother and πόλις, pólis = city/town) is a big city[1], in most cases with over half a million inhabitants in the city proper, and with a population of at least one million living... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... The clacks in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels is a network of semaphore towers stretching along the Sto Plains, into the Ramtops and across the Unnamed Continent to Genua. ... Moist von Lipwig is a character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


Reading order is not restricted to publication order. However, each arc may be best read chronologically.[3] The best introduction to the geography and structure of the world is The Colour of Magic, although the style and contents differ somewhat from what later Discworld developed into. Character and plot development became foremost in Guards! Guards! Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series contains over 30 novels, but they are not all dedicated to a single story arc. ... Guards! Guards! is the 8th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, first published in 1989. ...


Lists of novels

Name Group Notes Motifs
1 The Colour of Magic Rincewind First published 1983. Came 93rd in the Big Read. Fantasy clichés; role-playing games; H.P. Lovecraft; tourism; insurance
2 The Light Fantastic Rincewind First published 1986. Fantasy clichés; tourism
3 Equal Rites The Witches First published 1987. Fantasy clichés, Gender equality, Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea trilogy
4 Mort Death First published 1987. Came 65th in the Big Read. Death and its personification, Apprenticeship, the relationship between master and apprentice
5 Sourcery Rincewind First published 1988. Fantasy Stories, Apocalypse, Kubla Khan, Aladdin, Arabian Nights
6 Wyrd Sisters The Witches First published 1988. Came 135th in the Big Read. Shakespeare, especially Macbeth and Hamlet
7 Pyramids Miscellaneous, Gods First published 1989. School stories, Egyptian mythology, Quantum physics, Greek philosophy (Including Zeno's paradox), UK driving tests
8 Guards! Guards! The City Watch First published 1989. Came 69th in the Big Read. Cop novels (with some hints of film noir including Dirty Harry), show dogs, dragons, fantasy stories, fraternal organisations, monarchists, social contract, million-to-one chances, aristocracy
9 Faust Eric Rincewind First published 1990 in a larger format, fully illustrated by Josh Kirby. Reissued as a paperback without illustrations. Faust, Dante's Inferno, Homer's Iliad, Evolution
10 Moving Pictures Miscellaneous, The Wizards First published 1990. Hollywood (especially silent movies and the early years of the studio system), the Cthulhu Mythos, Celebrity, Lassie Come Home, King Kong, Gone with the Wind and many other movies
11 Reaper Man Death, The Wizards First published 1991. Came 126th in the Big Read. Death, Alien invasion SF, "Man with No Name" Westerns, Modernization, Shopping malls, Minority rights movements, even the odd nod to Ghostbusters
12 Witches Abroad The Witches First published 1991. Came 197th in the Big Read. Fairy tales, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Voodoo, Louisiana, and tourism
13 Small Gods Miscellaneous, the History Monks, Gods First published 1992. Came 102nd in the Big Read. Religion (especially Christianity,Islam,Judaism and the Spanish Inquisition, with major thematic references to Nietzsche), Philosophy (especially Ancient Greek)
14 Lords and Ladies The Witches, The Wizards First published 1992. Shakespeare especially A Midsummer Night's Dream, UFOs, Fairy lore, pop-culture Wicca
15 Men at Arms The City Watch First published 1993. Came 148th in the Big Read. Cop novels, gun politics, racial prejudice, Tolkien-type 'kings in hiding', Leonardo da Vinci
16 Soul Music Death, Susan, The Wizards First published 1994. Came 151st in the Big Read. Rock music, Beatlemania, and related stories (A running joke, "He looks elvish", refers both to the urban legend that Elvis is not dead, and to a well-known Kirsty McColl song). Also scenes taken from The Blues Brothers film (eg: "We're on a mission from Glod"). The crash of the plane carrying Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper features prominently as well. The Welsh language.
17 Interesting Times Rincewind, The Silver Horde First published 1994. Imperial China, Maoism, Lemmings (video game)
18 Maskerade The Witches First published 1995. Opera, The Phantom of the Opera, Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em, the Goth subculture, Celebrity
19 Feet of Clay The City Watch First published 1996. Cop Novels, Robots (RoboCop and Terminator 2: Judgment Day come in for particular attention. Issac Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics features in the Golems' Chem), Jewish Mythology, atheism, murder (or, here, attempted assassination) mysteries, ethnicity and minorities, heraldry, slavery/serfdom, Golem legend
20 Hogfather Death, Susan, The Wizards, Gods First published 1996. Came 137th in the Big Read. Christmas; Children's stories; religion as mythology, partly a parody of Mary Poppins; Is there a Santa Claus (Hogfather), and What does the tooth fairy do with all those teeth, anyway?, belief
21 Jingo The City Watch First published 1997. War, Diplomacy, Racism and Xenophobia, Multiculturalism, Jingoism, Imperialism, the Kennedy assassination, Leonardo da Vinci, submarines, Lawrence of Arabia, Julius Caesar, Captain Nemo, the Cthulhu Mythos
22 The Last Continent Rincewind, The Wizards First published 1998. Australia (Mad Max, Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, The Man from Snowy River, Aborigines and Dreamtime) Evolution/Creation, Waltzing Matilda
23 Carpe Jugulum The Witches & Überwald First published 1998. Vampire novels and films, Existentialism, Tradition versus Change, religion, morality
24 The Fifth Elephant The City Watch First published 1999. Came 153rd in the Big Read. Diplomacy, Eastern European folklore and literature, Political-conspiracy novels, petroleum, the global economy, national myths, werewolves, The Caine Mutiny
25 The Truth William de Worde, the City Watch First published 2000. Came 193rd in the Big Read. Watergate, Newspapers, Pulp Fiction, The Front Page and His Girl Friday, Organized crime, the power of the upper classes over everybody else
26 Thief of Time Death, Susan, the History Monks First published 2001. Came 152nd in the Big Read. Wuxia and Martial arts films, Chaos, James Bond movies, Quantum Physics, The Fab Four and the Apocalypse
27 The Last Hero Rincewind, The Silver Horde First published 2001. Published in a larger format, fully illustrated by Paul Kidby. Legends, Prometheus, D&D, Conan the Barbarian, the Space Shuttle program, Apollo 13, the designs of Leonardo da Vinci, Catch-22
28 The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents Miscellaneous First published 2001. A YA (young adult or children's) Discworld book. Winner of the 2001 Carnegie Medal. Beatrix Potter, The Pied Piper of Hamelin, The Secret of NIMH, Redwall, Watership Down
29 Night Watch The City Watch, the History Monks First published 2002. Received the Prometheus Award in 2003. Came 73rd in the Big Read. Cop Novels, Historical novels (esp. Les Misérables and The Napoleon of Notting Hill), time travel, the French Revolution, the Paris Commune of 1871, the Peterloo Massacre, the Spanish Inquisition, the Grandfather paradox, the achievements of revolution (or the non-achievements), the Remembrance Day flower-wearing tradition,Battle of Cable Street
30 The Wee Free Men Tiffany Aching First published 2003. Another YA Discworld book. Folklore, Mythic Scotland, as seen in Braveheart and Highlander, the fairy paintings of Richard Dadd; subjective experience, the Smurfs
31 Monstrous Regiment Miscellaneous, William de Worde, the City Watch First published 2003. The title is a reference to The First Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstrous Regiment of Women. Folk song (especially Sweet Polly Oliver), Joan of Arc, women who disguise themselves as men to join the army, the Napoleonic Wars (possibly as interpreted through Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe novels), First World War (especially the patriotism and "Home by Christmas" mentality), Vietnam War (in one character's "contagious visions"), feminism, Afghanistan and the Taliban, wartime journalism, deceitful military recruiting campaigns, the pointlessness of war and militarism
32 A Hat Full of Sky Tiffany Aching, Witches First published 2004. A third YA Discworld book. The history and folklore of witches in Britain, mind controlling aliens in science fiction, arguably Jill Murphy's The Worst Witch
33 Going Postal Moist von Lipwig First published 2004. Politics; con men; The Stainless Steel Rat; corporate crime and business practices; monopolies (Fox and Rupert Murdoch; and AT&T and its "Golden Boy"[4]); history of the Post Office; the Internet, cracking and phreaking; fraternal organizations; alternative medicine; stamp collecting and the hobbyist mentality in general; the three laws of robotics; Atlas Shrugged
34 Thud! The City Watch First published September 2005 Politics, Cop Novels, Affirmative Action, The Da Vinci Code, Plato, The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, race relations, fatherhood, chess and tafl
35 Wintersmith Tiffany Aching, Witches First published September 28, 2006. The fourth YA book. The Snow Queen, Orpheus, Persephone, Sleeping Beauty, The Snow Maiden
36 Making Money Moist von Lipwig First published September 20, 2007. gold standard vs. fiat currency, computer simulation, quantum physics, mad scientists
37 I Shall Wear Midnight Tiffany Aching Pratchett has stated that this is the next Discworld novel that will follow after completion of Nation (which is not a Discworld novel, as confirmed by the author at the Cheltenham Literature Festival October 6, 2007)
38(?) Raising Taxes Moist von Lipwig The third book in Moist's series, announced at the 9/21/07 book signing in Torrance, CA.[citation needed]
Possible future novels

Pratchett has occasionally hinted at other possible future Discworld novels. These include The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... Rincewind the Wizzard is a fictional character appearing in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, several of which feature him as the central character. ... The Big Read was a 2003 survey carried out by the BBC, with the goal of finding the Nations Best-loved Book by way of a viewer vote via the Web, SMS and telephone. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... “Tourist” redirects here. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. ... Equal Rites is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Feminists redirects here. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsÉ™lÉ™ ËŒkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Cover to 1991 Bantam Books paperback edition of A Wizard of Earthsea, illustrated by John Jude Palencar Earthsea is a fictional realm created by Ursula K. Le Guin for her short story The Word of Unbinding, published in 1964, but that became more famous in her novel A Wizard of... Also a term referring to laying brick. ... Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Apprenticeship is a system of training a new generation of skilled crafts practitioners, which is still popular in some countries. ... // A master craftsman (sometimes called only master or grandmaster) was a member of a guild. ... If youre looking for the TV show, see The Apprentice. ... Sourcery is the fifth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1988. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aladdin in the Magic Garden, an illustration by Max Liebert from Ludwig Fuldas Aladin und die Wunderlampe Aladdin (an adaptation of the Arabic name , Arabic: علاء الدين literally nobility of faith) is one of the tales with an Ancient Arabian origin[1] in The Book of One Thousand and One Nights... Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar. ... This article is about the novel. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Macbeth and Banquo meeting the witches on the heath by Théodore Chassériau. ... The American actor Edwin Booth as Hamlet, seated in a curule chair, c. ... Pyramids is the seventh Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1989. ... Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam. ... Fig. ... Greek philosophy focused on the role of reason and inquiry. ... Zenos paradoxes are a set of paradoxes devised by Zeno of Elea to support Parmenides doctrine that all is one and that contrary to the evidence of our senses, the belief in plurality and change is mistaken, and in particular that motion is nothing but an illusion. ... A Practical Driving Test is a test which United Kingdom learner drivers must pass to obtain a driving licence. ... Guards! Guards! is the 8th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, first published in 1989. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... For other uses, see Dirty Harry (disambiguation). ... An American Cocker Spaniel show dog with its ears wrapped in preparation for showing A show dog is a purebred dog that is displayed at conformation dog shows to determine how well it conforms to established breed standards. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... A fraternal organization is an organization that represents the relationship between its members as akin to brotherhood. ... Monarchism is the advocacy of the establishment, preservation, or restoration of a monarchy. ... John Lockes writings on the Social Contract were particularly influential among the American Founding Fathers. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The term aristocracy refers to a form of government where power is held by a small number of individuals from an elite or from noble families. ... Eric (commonly abbreviated F^HE – see backspace) is the ninth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Ronald William Josh Kirby (27 November 1928–23 October 2001), was a British commercial artist born in Waterloo, Lancashire and educated at the Liverpool City School of Art, where he acquired the nickname Josh. ... For other uses, see Faust (disambiguation). ... Dante in a fresco series of famous men by Andrea del Castagno, ca. ... Detail of a manuscript in Milans Biblioteca Trivulziana (MS 1080), written in 1337 by Francesco di ser Nardo da Barberino, showing the beginning of Dantes Comedy. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Moving Pictures is the name of the tenth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1990. ... ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... The studio system was a means of film production and distribution dominant in Hollywood from the early 1920s through the early 1950s. ... Cthulhu and Rlyeh The Cthulhu Mythos encompasses the shared elements, characters, settings, and themes in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and associated horror fiction writers. ... For other uses, see Celebrity (disambiguation). ... Lassie Come Home is a 1943 film which tells the story of a poor boys dog who, when sold to a rich nobleman, makes a difficult journey to return home to her original owner. ... This is about the original movie and novel. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... The alien invasion is a common theme in science fiction stories and film, in which a technologically-superior extraterrestrial society invades Earth with the intent to replace human life, or to enslave it under a colonial system, or in some cases, to use humans as food. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Cover of a book by Louis LAmour, one of Western fictions most prolific authors. ... Modernization (also Modernisation) is a concept in the sphere of social sciences that refers to process in which society goes through industrialization, urbanization and other social changes that completely transforms the lives of individuals. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... For other uses, see Ghostbusters (disambiguation). ... Witches Abroad is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, originally published in 1991. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... For the film, see The Wizard of Oz (1939 film). ... Voodoo (Vodou, Vodoun, Vudu, or Vudun in Benin, Togo, southeastern Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Senegal; also Vodou in Haiti) is a name attributed to a traditionally uten West African spiritual system of faith and ritual practices. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the novel Small Gods; for the concept of Small Gods within the Discworld, see small gods Small Gods is the thirteenth of Terry Pratchetts popular Discworld novels, published in 1992. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about one of the historical Inquisitions. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Lords and Ladies is the fourteenth Discworld book by Terry Pratchett. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... UFO redirects here. ... by Sophie Anderson For other uses, see Fairy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... For the novel by Evelyn Waugh, see Sword of Honour. ... Gun politics is a set of legal issues surrounding the ownership, use, and control of firearms as well as safety issues related to firearms both through their direct use and through criminal use. ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... The Beatles arrival at Americas JFK Airport in 1964 has proved a particularly enduring image of Beatlemania. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock and Roll, or as just simply The King, was an American singer who had an immeasurable effect on world culture. ... Kirsty MacColl (October 10, 1959 - December 18, 2000), the daughter of folk singer Ewan MacColl and dancer Jean Newlove, was a British pop singer-songwriter, who died tragically while saving her sons life. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Weezer song, see Buddy Holly (song). ... Ritchie Valens (born Ricardo Steven Valenzuela, May 13, 1941 – February 3, 1959) was a pioneer of rock and roll and a forefather to the Latin Rock movement. ... Jiles Perry Richardson, Jr. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Interesting Times is the seventeenth novel in the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. ... China is the worlds oldest continuous major civilization, with written records dating back about 3,500 years and with 5,000 years being commonly used by Chinese as the age of their civilization. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Lemmings is a puzzle computer game, developed by DMA Design (now Rockstar North) and published by Psygnosis in 1991, originally for the Commodore Amiga. ... Maskerade is the eighteenth novel in the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. ... This article is about Opera, the art form. ... This article is about the Gaston Leroux novel. ... Frank Spencer sporting his trademark beret in a scene with Broadcaster David Jacobs Some Mothers Do Ave Em (1973-1978) was a BBC situation comedy, written by Raymond Allen and starring Michael Crawford and Michele Dotrice. ... This article is about the late 20th / early 21st century subculture. ... For other uses, see Celebrity (disambiguation). ... Feet of Clay is the nineteenth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, and a parody of detective novels. ... This is a chronological list of robots and androids in literature and cinema. ... RoboCop is a 1987 science-fiction, action movie and satire of business-driven capitalism, directed by Paul Verhoeven. ... Terminator 2: Judgment Day (commonly abbreviated T2) is a 1991 movie directed by James Cameron and starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, and Robert Patrick. ... This cover of I, Robot illustrates the story Runaround, the first to list all Three Laws of Robotics. ... “Atheist” redirects here. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... Slave redirects here. ... “Serf” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Golem (disambiguation). ... Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Mary Poppins series of childrens books. ... Look up Tooth fairy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Jingo is a novel by Terry Pratchett, one of his phenomenally popular Discworld series. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... This article is about negotiations. ... This box:      Racism has many definitions, the most common and widely accepted is that members of one race are intrinsically superior or inferior to members of other races. ... Look up xenophobia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term multiculturalism is used to describe the recognition of cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... Ten Thousand Miles From Tip to Tip, an 1898 political cartoon depicting the extension of the United States dominion Jingoism is chauvinistic patriotism, usually associated with a War Hawk political stance. ... Cecil Rhodes: Cape-Cairo railway project. ... John F. Kennedy The assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the thirty-fifth President of the United States, took place on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, USA at 12:30 PM Central Standard Time (18:30 UTC). ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ... Thomas Edward Lawrence (August 16, 1888 – May 19, 1935), also known as Lawrence of Arabia, and (apparently, among his Arab allies) Aurens or El Aurens, became famous for his role as a British liaison officer during the Arab Revolt of 1916–1918. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Captain Nemo is a fictional character featured in Jules Vernes novels Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870) and The Mysterious Island (1874). ... Cthulhu and Rlyeh The Cthulhu Mythos encompasses the shared elements, characters, settings, and themes in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and associated horror fiction writers. ... The Last Continent is the twenty-second Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, first published in 1998, that parodies Australian people and culture, as well as the famous Crocodile Dundee and Mad Max movies and the popular Australian song Waltzing Matilda. ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert is a 1994 Oscar-winning Australian film about two drag queens and a transsexual woman driving across the outback from Sydney to Alice Springs in a large bus they have named Priscilla. ... For other uses, see The Man from Snowy River. ... Languages Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religions Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group names Indigenous... opens chapter nine of The Dreaming Universe (1994) entitled The Dreamtime with a quote from The Last Wave, a film by Peter Weir: Aboriginals believe in two forms of time. ... Waltzing Matilda is usually sung in informal settings, but it was played with a 90 piece orchestra and the 100 voice Melbourne Chorale at the 2005 Classical Spectacular Waltzing Matilda is Australias most widely known folk song, and one that has been popularly suggested as a potential national anthem. ... Carpe Jugulum is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the twenty third in the Discworld series. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... Existentialism is a philosophical movement which claims that individual human beings create the meanings of their own lives. ... The Fifth Elephant is the 24th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Eastern Europe is, by convention, a region defined geographically as that part of Europe covering the eastern part of the continent. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... In a political sense, conspiracy refers to a group of persons united in the goal of usurping or overthrowing an established political power. ... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Lubbock, Texas Ignacy Łukasiewicz - inventor of the refining of kerosene from crude oil. ... The world economy can be represented various ways, and broken down in various ways. ... A national myth is an inspiring narrative or anecdote about a nations past. ... A werewolf in folklore and mythology is a person who changes into a wolf, either by purposefully using magic in some manner or by being placed under a curse. ... This is about the 1954 film. ... This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ... “Watergate” redirects here. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... The Front Page was a smash hit Broadway comedy written in 1928 by onetime Chicago, Illinois reporters Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur. ... His Girl Friday is a 1940 screwball comedy, a remake of the 1931 film The Front Page, itself an adaptation by Charles Lederer, Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur of their play of the same name. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... Thief of Time is the 26th Discworld novel written by Terry Pratchett. ... WÇ”xiá (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: , Mandarin IPA: , Cantonese Pinyin: mou5 hap6), literally meaning martial (arts) heroes, is a distinct quasi-fantasy sub-genre of the martial arts genre in literature, television and cinema. ... Martial arts film is a film genre that originated in the Pacific Rim. ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... “007” redirects here. ... Fig. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the fantasy novel. ... Kidbys cover of The Science of Discworld, which is a parody of the painting An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump by Joseph Wright. ... A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ... For other uses, see Prometheus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dungeons & Dragons (disambiguation). ... This article is about the fictional character. ... NASAs Space Shuttle, officially called Space Transportation System (STS), is the United States governments current manned launch vehicle. ... Original crew photo. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Catch 22 can refer to: A book by Joseph Heller, or the movie based on the book; see Catch-22. ... The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents is the 28th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2001. ... Helen Beatrix Potter (28 July 1866 – 22 December 1943) was an English author and illustrator, botanist, and conservationist, best known for her childrens books, which featured animal characters such as Peter Rabbit. ... The oldest picture of Pied Piper (watercolour) copied from the glass window of Marktkirche in Hamelin by Freiherr Augustin von Moersperg. ... Mrs. ... Redwall was the first book in the eponymous series by Brian Jacques. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Night Watch is the 29th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2002. ... The Prometheus Award is an award for libertarian science fiction novels given out annually by the Libertarian Futurist Society (which also publishes a quarterly journal, Prometheus). ... Les Misérables (translated variously from French as The Miserable Ones, The Wretched, The Poor Ones, The Wretched Poor, The Victims) (1862) is a novel by French author Victor Hugo, and among the best-known novels of the 19th century. ... Novel written by G. K. Chesterton in 1904, set in a nearly-unchanged London of the latter Twentieth century. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Well now! buggering rascal, we will knock you the fuck off just like your crook of... Print of the Peterloo Massacre published by Richard Carlile Peterloo Massacre of August 16, 1819 was the result of a cavalry charge into the crowd at a public meeting at St Peters Fields, Manchester, England. ... This article is about one of the historical Inquisitions. ... The grandfather paradox is a paradox of time travel, first described by the science fiction writer René Barjavel in his 1943 book Le Voyageur Imprudent (The Imprudent Traveller).[1] The paradox is this: Suppose a man traveled back in time and killed his biological grandfather before the latter met the... Wreaths of artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance Remembrance Day (United Kingdom, Australia, Canada), also known as Poppy Day (South Africa and Malta), and Armistice Day (United States, New Zealand, France, and many other Commonwealth countries; and the original name of the day internationally) is a day to... The Battle of Cable Street or Cable Street Riot took place on Sunday October 4, 1936 in Cable Street in the East End of London. ... For The Wee Free, see the Free Church of Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Highlander is a 1986 film directed by Russell Mulcahy and based on a story by Gregory Widen. ... by Sophie Anderson For other uses, see Fairy (disambiguation). ... Richard Dadd. ... The sensory buzz and awareness associated with a conscious mind is often called subjective experience. ... “Smurf” redirects here. ... Monstrous Regiment is the 31st novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Monstrous regiment, or monstrous regiment of women are phrases which have become notorious; they are borrowed from the title of a work by the Scot John Knox, published in 1558, The First Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstrous Regiment of Women. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Sweet Polly Oliver is an English folk song, dating from at least 1840. ... For other uses, see Joan of Arc (disambiguation). ... Many people have engaged in crossdressing during wartime under various circumstances and for various motives. ... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Sicily  Spain[3]  Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Italy Naples [5] Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[6] Saxony[7] Denmark-Norway [8] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich João Francisco de Saldanha Oliveira e Daun Gebhard von... Bernard Cornwell OBE (born February 23, 1944) is a prolific and popular English historical novelist. ... Richard Sharpe is the central character in Bernard Cornwells Sharpe which also formed the basis for the Sharpe television series, where the eponymous character was played by Sean Bean. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Feminists redirects here. ... The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim Pashtun movement that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1995 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the United States, United Kingdom and the Northern Alliance. ... Militarism or militarist ideology is the doctrinal view of a society as being best served (or more efficient) when it is governed or guided by concepts embodied in the culture, doctrine, system, or people of the military. ... A Hat Full of Sky is a novel written by Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld, written with younger readers in mind. ... “Green people” redirects here. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Jill Murphy (born July 5, 1949) is an English childrens author, known primarily for The Worst Witch books. ... Jill Murphys cover for her third novel, A Bad Spell For the Worst Witch The Worst Witch is a series of childrens books written and illustrated by Jill Murphy. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, Oklahoma. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Confidence Man redirects here. ... The Stainless Steel Rat refers to a fictional character and the series of novels involving the character. ... In criminology, corporate crime refers to crimes either committed by a corporation, i. ... // General definition Business ethics is the branch of ethics that examines ethical rules and principles within a commercial context; the various moral or ethical problems that can arise in a business setting; and any special duties or obligations that apply to persons who are engaged in commerce. ... Fox Entertainment Group is an American entertainment industry company that owns film studios and terrestrial, cable, and direct broadcast satellite television properties. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... In computer security, hacker refers to a type of computer hacker who is involved in programming and computer insecurity and are able to exploits systems and/or gain unauthorized access through skills, tactics and detailed knowledge. ... It has been suggested that Evan Doorbell be merged into this article or section. ... A fraternal organization, sometimes also known as a fraternity, is an organization that represents the relationship between its members as akin to brotherhood. ... Alternative medicine is defined as any of various systems of healing or treating disease (as chiropractic, homeopathy, or faith healing) not included in the traditional medical curricula taught in the United States and Britain.[1] Complementary medicine is defined as any of the practices (as acupuncture) of alternative medicine accepted... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This cover of I, Robot illustrates the story Runaround, the first to list all Three Laws of Robotics. ... For the film, see Atlas Shrugged (film). ... Thud! is Terry Pratchetts 34th Discworld novel, released in the United States of America and the United Kingdom on September 13, and it may have been released already in other countries, such as Norway [1] and Denmark. ... This box:      Affirmative actionrefers to policies intended to promote access to education or employment aimed at a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically, minorities or women). ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... This article is about the novel. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens mythopoeic works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien in 1977, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... Race relations is the area of sociology that studies the social, political, and economic relations between races at all different levels of society. ... For other uses, see Father (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chess (disambiguation). ... Tafl games are a family of ancient Germanic board games played on a checkered board with two teams of uneven strength. ... Wintersmith is the title of the third Tiffany Aching novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published on the 21 September 2006. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of a modern Danish edtion of The Snow Queen (Sneedronningen) Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Snow Queen The Snow Queen (Danish: Sneedronningen) is a fairy tale written by Hans Christian Andersen and first published in 1845. ... For other uses, see Orpheus (disambiguation). ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, PersephónÄ“) was the Queen of the Underworld of epic literature. ... Sir Edward Burne-Jones painted The Sleeping Beauty. ... The Snow Maiden (дипломник in Russian, Snegurochka in transliteration) is an opera in four acts by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov to a Russian libretto by the composer, based on the play by Alexandr Ostrovsky. ... For the actual making of money, see Mint for the making of coins and Banknote concerning the production of paper money. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Gold standard (disambiguation). ... Look up fiat in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that simulation software be merged into this article or section. ... Fig. ... Caucasian, male, aging, bad teeth, worse hair, spectacles/goggles, dramatic posing — A very stereotypical mad scientist. ... I Shall Wear Midnight is the working title of the possible fourth Tiffany Aching novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Unseen University (UU) is a school of wizardry in the fictional Discworld city of Ankh-Morpork, staffed by a faculty composed of mostly indolent and inept old wizards. ... Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship Through Woodcraft is the first book on Scouting. ...

Short stories

There are five short stories by Pratchett based in the Discworld, and an additional short story (Turntables of the Night), that is based in the United Kingdom and Death has a featured role: Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...

Four of the short stories along with Discworld miscellany (e.g. the history of Thud and the Ankh-Morpork national anthem) have been collected in a compilation of the majority of Pratchett's known short work named Once More* With Footnotes. Troll Bridge is a Discworld short story, written by Terry Pratchett for a collection entitled After The King: Stories in Honour of J.R.R. Tolkien. ... Mike Ashley is a radio presenter for 100. ... Theatre of Cruelty is a short Discworld story by Terry Pratchett written in 1993. ... The Sea and Little Fishes is a short story by Terry Pratchett set in his Discworld universe, and featuring Lancre witches Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg. ... Legends is a collection of short stories by a number of noteworthy fantasy authors, edited by Robert Silverberg. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Robert Silverberg (January 15, 1935, Brooklyn, New York) is a prolific American author best known for writing science fiction, a multiple winner of both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. ... Death and What Comes Next is a Discworld short story by Terry Pratchett. ... A Collegiate Casting-Out of Devilish Devices is a Discworld short story by Terry Pratchett. ... Thud is a board game devised by Trevor Truran and first published in 2002, inspired by the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ... Once More* With Footnotes is a book by Terry Pratchett, published by NESFA Press in 2004 when he was the Guest of Honor for Noreascon Four, the 62nd World Science Fiction Convention. ...


The Mapps

Furthermore, there are four "Mapps":

The first two were drawn by Stephen Player, based on plans by Pratchett and Stephen Briggs, the third is a collaboration between Briggs and Kidby, and the last is by Paul Kidby. All also contain booklets written by Pratchett and Briggs. The first of the Discworld Mapp series, despite the authors original long-held opinion that a fantasy world could not and should not be mapped. ... The Discworld Mapp is an atlas that contains a large, fold out map of the Discworld (sold by CMOT Dibbler) drawn by Stephen Player to the directions of Terry Pratchett and Stephen Briggs. ... A Tourist Guide To Lancre is the third book in the Discworld Mapp series, and the first to be illustrated by Paul Kidby. ... Cover of the book. ... Stephen Briggs is, in his own words, a civil servant who dabbles in amateur dramatics. However, through his drama work, he has become heavily involved with the subsidiary works and merchandise surrounding Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... Kidbys cover of The Science of Discworld, which is a parody of the painting An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump by Joseph Wright. ...


Terry Pratchett also admitted: "There are no maps. You can't map a sense of humour."


Science books

Pratchett has also collaborated with Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen on three books using the Discworld to illuminate popular science topics. Each book alternates chapters of a Discworld story and notes on real science related to it. The books are: Ian Stewart, FRS (b. ... Jack Cohen is a reproductive biologist at the University of Warwick, England. ... This article is not about the magazine, Popular Science Popular science is interpretation of science intended for a general audience, rather than for other scientists or students. ...

The Science of Discworld is a 1999 book written by novelist Terry Pratchett and popular science writers Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen. ... The Science of Discworld II: The Globe (ISBN 0091888050) is a 2002 book written by novelist Terry Pratchett and popular science writers Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen. ...

Quiz books

Two Discworld Quiz books have been compiled by David Langford: A quiz is a form of game or mind sport in which the players (as individuals or in teams), attempt to answer questions correctly. ... David Langford David Rowland Langford (born April 10, 1953, in Newport, Monmouthshire) is a British author, editor and critic, largely active within the science fiction field. ...

The first Discworld quizbook, the UU Challenge was written by David Langford (With Terry Pratchetts permission, of course) and was published at least on or before 1996, though Im not sure of the exact date. ... University Challenge is a long-running British television quiz show, licensed and produced by Granada Television. ... The Weakest Link (known as Weakest Link in many countries) is a television game show which first appeared in the United Kingdom on BBC Two on 14 August 2000. ...

Diaries

Main article: Discworld Diary

Most years see the release of a Discworld Diary and Calendar, both usually following a particular theme. Cover of the 2000 Discworld diary The Discworld Diaries are a series of themed diaries based on the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett. ...


The diaries feature a great deal of background information about their respective themes, far more than could reasonably be put into the novels. However, some of this occasionally finds its way into the series proper - the concept of female assassins and the character of Miss Alice Band were two notable ideas that first appeared in the Assassins' Guild Yearbook.


The Discworld Almanak - The Year of The Prawn can also be listed with the diaries, as its format and general contents are very similar. The Discworld Almanak is a spin-off book from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels, in a similar format to the Diaries and Nanny Oggs Cookbook. ...


Other books

Other Discworld publications include:

The Pratchett Portfolio is a small collection of the artistic works of Paul Kidby, illustrating the characters of Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... The Discworld Companion is an encyclopedia to all things Discworldian, created by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Briggs. ... Nanny Oggs Cookbook is a book of recipes and wisdom of the Discworld character Nanny Ogg by Terry Pratchett, Stephen Briggs and Tina Hannan. ... Stephen Briggs is, in his own words, a civil servant who dabbles in amateur dramatics. However, through his drama work, he has become heavily involved with the subsidiary works and merchandise surrounding Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... Tina Hannan is a London-based writer, most noted for the book Nanny Oggs Cookbook, co-written with the well-known fantasy author Terry Pratchett as a companion to the Discworld series. ... The Art of Discworld is a descriptive book of the world of the Discworld as portrayed in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... The Discworld Almanak is a spin-off book from Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels, in a similar format to the Diaries and Nanny Oggs Cookbook. ... An almanac (also spelled almanack, especially in Commonwealth English) is an annual publication containing tabular information in a particular field or fields often arranged according to the calendar. ... Bernard Pearson ( otherwise dubbed by Terry Pratchett as The Cunning Artificer ) is best known for his sculptures of Discworld characters and buildings initially at Clarecraft ( which he co-founded ) and subsequently at his shop in Wincanton, England. ... Wheres My Cow? is a picture book written by Terry Pratchett and illustrated by Melvyn Grant. ... Thud! is Terry Pratchetts 34th Discworld novel, released in the United States of America and the United Kingdom on September 13, and it may have been released already in other countries, such as Norway [1] and Denmark. ... Melvyn Grant is an English digital graphic artist and illustrator. ... The Unseen University Cut out Book is a cutout book that allows a reader to construct a replica of Unseen University from Terry Pratchetts Discworld Series. ... Bernard Pearson ( otherwise dubbed by Terry Pratchett as The Cunning Artificer ) is best known for his sculptures of Discworld characters and buildings initially at Clarecraft ( which he co-founded ) and subsequently at his shop in Wincanton, England. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Adaptations

Stage

Stage adaptations of 15 Discworld novels have been published. The adaptations are by Stephen Briggs (apart from Lords and Ladies by Irana Brown), and were first produced by the Studio Theatre Club in Abingdon, Oxfordshire. They include adaptations of The Truth, Maskerade, Mort, Wyrd Sisters, and Guards! Guards! Stage adaptations of Discworld novels have been performed on every continent in the world, including Antarctica. Abingdon is a market town in Oxfordshire, England and is one of the towns which claim to be Britains oldest continuously occupied town. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ...

Film & Television

Due in part to the complexity of the novels, Discworld has been difficult to adapt to film – Pratchett is fond of an anecdote of a producer attempting to pitch an adaptation of Mort in early 1990s but told to "lose the Death angle" by US backers.[10]
A list of completed adaptations include: Also a term referring to laying brick. ...


A list of adaptations in pre-production include: Terry Pratchetts Hogfather is a two-part television adaptation of the book of the same name by Terry Pratchett, produced by The Mob, and broadcast on Sky One, and in High Definition on Sky One HD, over Christmas 2006. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Terry Pratchetts Hogfather is a two-part television adaptation of the book of the same name by Terry Pratchett, produced by The Mob, and broadcast on Sky One, and in High Definition on Sky One HD, over Christmas 2006. ... Sir David Jason, OBE (born February 2, 1940) is a highly regarded English actor, admired equally for his dramatic work as for his comedy roles. ... Lords and Ladies is the fourteenth Discworld book by Terry Pratchett. ... Cosgrove Hall Films is an animation studio based in Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester that is a major producer of childrens television programmes. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Region 1, Region 2 and Region 3 redirect here. ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... Christopher Frank Carandini Lee, CBE (born May 27, 1922) is an English actor known for his professional longevity and his distinctive basso delivery. ... Neil Morrissey (born in Stafford, July 4, 1962) is a British actor. ... Graham Crowden (born 30 November 1922) is a Scottish actor, best known for his roles in BBC comedy-dramas. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... This article is about the novel. ... Annette Crosbie, OBE (born 12 February 1934) is a Scottish character actress, best known for her many television appearances. ... June Whitfield CBE 1925 in Streatham, London) is a well-known English actress. ... Jane Horrocks Jane Horrocks (born January 18, 1964) is an English actress and singer. ... Les Dennis (born Leslie Dennis Heseltine on October 12, 1954 in Liverpool, Merseyside, England) is an English television presenter and actor. ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

There have also been several aborted attempts at bringing stories from the Discworld to the silver screen, such as a fan attempt of Maskerade that failed through lack of funds. [citation needed] The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. ... Troll Bridge is a live action movie adaptation of a short story by Terry Pratchett; the company responsible is Snowgum Films. ... Snowgum Films is an independent film company based in Melbourne, Australia. ... For The Wee Free, see the Free Church of Scotland. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the American opera singer, see Samuel Ramey. ... Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is the television and film production unit of Japan-based corporate giant Sony. ... Spider-Man 3 is a 2007 American superhero film written and directed by Sam Raimi, with a screenplay by Ivan Raimi and Alvin Sargent. ... For the American opera singer, see Samuel Ramey. ...

Radio

There have been several BBC radio adaptations of Discworld stories, including Wyrd Sisters, Guards! Guards! (narrated by Martin Jarvis), The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, Mort and Small Gods. This article is about the novel. ... Guards! Guards! is the 8th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, first published in 1989. ... Martin Jarvis (born August 4, 1941 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England) is an English actor. ... The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents is the 28th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2001. ... Also a term referring to laying brick. ... This article is about the novel Small Gods; for the concept of Small Gods within the Discworld, see Discworld Gods Small Gods is the thirteenth of Terry Pratchetts popular Discworld novels, published in 1992. ...

Audio book

Most of Pratchett's novels have been released as audio books, both abridged (read by Tony Robinson) and unabridged (earlier ones read by Nigel Planer or Celia Imrie, later ones by Stephen Briggs). Cassette recording of Patrick OBrians The Mauritius Command An audio book is a recording of the contents of a book read aloud. ... Tony Robinson (born 15 August 1946) is an English actor, broadcaster and political campaigner, known for playing the part of Baldrick in the BBC TV series Blackadder and for hosting a number of shows on Channel 4, the most noteworthy being Time Team. ... Nigel George Planer (born February 22, 1953 in London) is an English actor, novelist and playwright. ... Celie Imrie (born 15 July 1952 in Guildford England) is a British actress. ... Stephen Briggs is, in his own words, a civil servant who dabbles in amateur dramatics. However, through his drama work, he has become heavily involved with the subsidiary works and merchandise surrounding Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ...

Comic books

The Colour of Magic, The Light Fantastic, Mort, and Guards! Guards! have been adapted into graphic novels. The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. ... Also a term referring to laying brick. ... Guards! Guards! is the 8th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, first published in 1989. ... Graphic novel (sometimes abbreviated GN) is a term for a kind of book, usually telling an extended story with sequential art ( comics). ...


Merchandise

Various other types of related merchandise have been produced by cottage industries with an interest in the books, including Stephen Briggs, Bernard Pearson, Bonsai Trading and Clarecraft. The use of the term has expanded, and is used to refer to any event which allows a large number of people to lalalawork part time. ... Stephen Briggs is, in his own words, a civil servant who dabbles in amateur dramatics. However, through his drama work, he has become heavily involved with the subsidiary works and merchandise surrounding Terry Pratchetts Discworld. ... Bernard Pearson ( otherwise dubbed by Terry Pratchett as The Cunning Artificer ) is best known for his sculptures of Discworld characters and buildings initially at Clarecraft ( which he co-founded ) and subsequently at his shop in Wincanton, England. ... Taken directly from the website: For many years now, we at Clarecraft have been proud to work with Terry Pratchett in the production of his Discworld characters. ...


Music

  • Dave Greenslade: Terry Pratchett's From the Discworld, 1994 (Virgin CDV 2738.7243 8 39512 2 2).[16]
  • Keith Hopwood: Soul Music - Terry Pratchett's Discworld, 1998 (Proper Music Distribution / Pluto Music TH 030746), soundtrack to the animated adaptation of Soul Music.

Dave Greenslade is a British Keyboards player. ... Keith Hopwood served as rhythm guitarist for the 60s pop band Hermans Hermits. ...

Games

Pratchett co-authored with Phil Masters two role-playing game supplements for Discworld, utilising the GURPS system: This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... The Generic Universal RolePlaying System, commonly known as GURPS, is a role-playing game system designed to adapt to any imaginary gaming environment. ...

An unofficial online supplement to this is: GURPS Discworld is a role-playing game sourcebook set in Terry Pratchetts Discworld fantasy universe, and utilising the GURPS rules. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Available computer games are:

The board game, Thud was created by puzzle compiler Trevor Truran. The Colour of Magic was the first Discworld computer game and so far the only one directly adapted from a Discworld novel. ... The ZX Spectrum is a home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... C-64 redirects here. ... Discworld is a graphic adventure game developed by Teeny Weeny Games and Perfect 10 Productions in mid-1995. ... The Columbia MPC was one of the many IBM PC compatibles offered on the US market. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... For other uses, see Macintosh (disambiguation) and Mac. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... It has been suggested that Arcade Racer Joystick be merged into this article or section. ... Discworld II: Missing Presumed. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... “Windows” redirects here. ... Discworld Noir is a computer game based on Terry Pratchetts Discworld comic fantasy novels, and unlike the previous Discworld games is both an example and parody of the noir genre. ... Discworld MUD is a free Multi-User Dungeon set in the Discworld as depicted in the Discworld series of books by Terry Pratchett. ... A board game is a game played with counters or pieces that are placed on, removed from, or moved across a board (a premarked surface, usually specific to that game). ... Thud is a board game devised by Trevor Truran and first published in 2002, inspired by the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


The card game Cripple Mr Onion is adapted from the novel Witches Abroad. Cripple Mr Onion was originally a fictional card game played by characters in Terry Pratchetts novels Wyrd Sisters and Witches Abroad. ... Witches Abroad is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, originally published in 1991. ...


Stealth philosophy

Throughout many of his novels, Pratchett employs what has been dubbed "stealth philosophy"[citation needed] by which he will hide philosophical struggles, questions, and arguments within the texts, without (often) overtly stating them. Pratchett is concerned about the philosophy of ethics, the philosophy of religion, the mind as well as topics related to popular science - lampooning the usual misunderstandings of concepts like quantum physics ("it's probably quantum") and theory of Relativity. For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ... Philosophy of religion is the rational study of the meaning and justification ( or rebuttal) of fundamental religious claims, particularly about the nature and existence of God (or gods, or the divine). ... A Phrenological mapping of the brain. ... This article is not about the magazine, Popular Science Popular science is interpretation of science intended for a general audience, rather than for other scientists or students. ... Fig. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Quantum mysticism. ... Two-dimensional analogy of space-time curvature described in General Relativity. ...


"Villains"

Discworld has a relative lack of recurring or overarching villains. Many of Pratchett's potential villains, such as Lord Vetinari and Lord Downey, are too complex or multifaceted to be simplistically characterised as "evil", while other more standard villains, such as Lord Rust, are depicted merely as egocentric dullards. Principal villains in Discworld novels tend to die or be put similarly out of action by the story's end. The Lovecraftian creatures from the Dungeon Dimensions cannot be considered evil in any true sense, since they are utterly amoral. This article contains brief biographies for characters from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... H. P. Lovecraft Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890–March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy and horror fiction, noted for giving horror stories a science fiction framework. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, the Dungeon Dimensions are the endless wastelands outside of space and time. ...


Elves and auditors

There are, however, two groups of villains that feature prominently in many of the stories and have, in their own ways, come to represent the force of 'wrongness' in the Discworld: the Auditors of Reality and the Elves. These two races are, in many respects, opposite ends of the same spectrum. A wrong or being wrong is a concept in law, ethics, and science. ... The Auditors of Reality are fictional godlike beings in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels elves are extradimensional inhuman monsters. ...


The Auditors, cosmic bureaucrats who prefer a universe where electrons spin, rocks float in space and imagination is dead, represent the perils of handing yourself over to a completely materialist and deterministic vision of reality, devoid of the myths and stories that make us human. The Elves, innately psychopathic beings who seek to dominate people by usurping their free will with glamour and false magic, represent the dangers of giving yourself over completely to stories and superstition.


Together they appear to reflect the philosophy Pratchett expresses in Hogfather; that while the stories we weave may not be true, we still need them to continue our existence. However, it would be wrong to categorise the Auditors or Elves simply as 'evil'. While their actions cause misery, it is merely incidental. Elves do not understand the suffering they cause as they have no empathy, while the Auditors are simply a form of supernatural bureaucrat who think humans cause too much inefficiency. Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... A bureaucrat is a member of a bureaucracy, usually within an institution of the government. ...


Humans

His good witch, Granny Weatherwax, takes the form of an archetypical evil crone: White witch or good witch are qualifying terms in English used to distinguish those helpful witches who do not use magic to harm others from normal witches. ... Esmerelda Esme Weatherwax (usually called Granny Weatherwax) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...

Mrs Earwig would definitely have objected to the cottage. It was out of storybook. The walls leaned against one another for support, the thatched roof was slipping off like a bad wig, and the chimneys were corkscrewed. If you thought a gingerbread house would be too fattening, this was the next worst thing.
"In a cottage deep in the forest lived the wicked old witch ..."
It was a cottage out of the nastier kind of fairy tale. A major subset of the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett involves the witches of Lancre. ...

A Hat Full of Sky

His good public servant, Lord Havelock Vetinari, is an assassin and a tyrant, but acting in his city's best interests as a benevolent dictator nonetheless. It is the general consensus among fans[citation needed] that he is based on Machiavelli. Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, the head of the fictional city state of Ankh-Morpork in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Jack Ruby murdered the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The benevolent dictator is a more modern version of the classical enlightened despot, being an undemocratic or authoritarian leader who exercises his or her political power for the benefit of the people rather than exclusively for his or her own self-interest or benefit, or for the benefit of only... Detail of the portrait of Machiavelli, ca 1500, in the robes of a Florentine public official Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469—June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher during the Renaissance. ...


In general, Pratchett presents the notion that to be good quite often results in being perceived as bad or evil by the very people you're doing good for, and in many of his stories image is eventually overcome, without fanfare, by substance.

Some people will do anything for the sheer fascination of doing it, said Death. Or for fame. Or because they shouldn't.
Hogfather

In the "elf" books as elsewhere, he presents the notion that our "world" is subjective, and is constructed internally. In particular, that it is constructed out of stories. Related to this is the idea that most of our experience is filtered out before it reaches consciousness: To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

You build little worlds, little stories, little shells around your mind and that keeps infinity at bay and allows you to wake up in the morning without screaming!
A Hat Full of Sky
"All right," said Susan, "I'm not stupid. You're saying humans need ... fantasies to make life bearable."
No. Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape.
"Tooth fairies? Hogfathers?"
Yes. As practice. You have to start out learning to believe the little lies.
"So we can believe the big ones?"
Yes. Justice. Mercy. Duty. That sort of thing.
"They're not the same at all!"
Take the universe and grind it down to the finest powder and sieve it through with the finest sieve and then show me one atom of justice, one molecule of mercy. And yet you act as if there were some sort of rightness in the universe by which it may be judged.
"Yes. But people have got to believe that or what's the point — "
My point exactly.
Hogfather

Also in the Elves books he presents elves as nasty, evil creatures, as they are in original English folk songs and stories e.g. Tam Lin, quite in contrast with how they were portrayed by Tolkien which is more commonly known these days. Tam Lin is the hero of a Borders legend about fairies and mortal men. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916, wearing his British Army uniform in a photograph from the middle years of WW1. ...

"Elves are wonderful. They provoke wonder.
Elves are marvellous. They cause marvels.
Elves are fantastic. They create fantasies.
Elves are glamorous. They project glamour.
Elves are enchanting. They weave enchantment.
Elves are terrific. They beget terror.
The thing about words is that meanings can twist just like a snake..."
Nobody said elves were nice.
Elves are bad.
Lords and Ladies

A large portion of Carpe Jugulum is about "internal struggles", and how pieces of our mind do not always agree with other pieces of our mind (and how some of us feel we have "Darker" selves within us, that we keep deep, deep down). Aside from the obviously "split" mind character (Perdita and Agnes), it is shown that even characters as decisive as Granny Weatherwax have inner "selves" with whom they struggle.


While central human villains do not recur from novel to novel the individuals often share certain personality traits. The most prominent of these traits is the lack of the aforementioned "internal struggle". They are villains not because their bad self has won the struggle, but because they never had a conception of good and bad in the first place. This results in a person who is completely dispassionate, egocentric, and lacking most recognizeable human emotions. This is very similar to the character of the elves, but portrayed in a more negative light, since such characteristics are inherent in elves as a species, while the reason for a human to act in such a manner is less clear cut. These amoral human villains are often highly intelligent and develop schemes to shape society or the world to conform to their views of how things should work. While the description may not apply to every central villain, many of them could be described as sociopaths. Examples include Vorbis (Small Gods) and Mr. Teatime (Hogfather). Egocentrism is the practice of regarding oneself and ones own opinions or interests as most important. ... Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a psychiatric condition characterized by an individuals common disregard for social rules, norms, and cultural codes, as well as impulsive behavior, and indifference to the rights and feelings of others. ... This article contains brief biographies for characters from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... The Ankh-Morpork Assassins Guild is a fictional school for professional killers in Terry Pratchetts longrunning Discworld series of fantasy novels. ...


The concept of racial hatred is touched upon often when Trolls and Dwarves are present and forms a significant plot pillar in Thud!, in which the most ardent proponents of racial hatred are the clear villains. The Problems of racial integration and multiculturalism and racial hatred is also a strong topic of "Jingo" echoing the gulf wars, and the long held divisions and superstitions between rival great powers such as Britain and France, Germany and Russia, U.S. and the USSR, Japan and China using the metaphor of "two big men in a small room". Thud! is Terry Pratchetts 34th Discworld novel, released in the United States of America and the United Kingdom on September 13, and it may have been released already in other countries, such as Norway [1] and Denmark. ...


"Heroes"

In several books, characters or narration bring up the question of precisely what constitutes a "hero" and whether there's anything really "heroic" about gung-ho violence. For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ...


This is generally the basis for Cohen the Barbarian and the actions of his Silver Horde, as shown in The Last Hero, in which the Patrician points out that when people say that heroes defeat tyrants, steal things from the gods, seduce women and kill monsters, they are, in fact, saying, that heroes murder, steal, rape, and wipe out endangered species. Lord Vetinari also asks the question, "When a tyrant is defeated or a monster killed, who is the person defining the monstrousness of the monster, or the tyranny of the tyrant? The hero. In fact, when a hero kills someone, he is in fact saying that, if you have been killed by a hero, then you are a person who is suitable to be killed by a hero." Ghenghiz Cohen, known as Cohen the Barbarian is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. ... This article is about the fantasy novel. ...


Many Discworld stories feature Rincewind, a dour and ill-fated wizard who specializes in the art of the escape. Any 'heroic' actions on Rincewind's part are, for the most part, caused by accident or sheer bad luck, which often puts him straight back into the very situation he was running from in the first place. Rincewind is categorically not a 'hero' in the traditional sense, since he merely wants to be left alone. Many Discworld protagonists share this trait, such as Moving Pictures' Victor Tugelbend and The Truth's William de Worde.


In particular, The Fifth Elephant raises the point of view that if someone can kill a villain and then joke about it, they are no less a murderer than the villain himself. This thought is had by Commander Vimes, who actually considers several possible "quips" after tricking the villain to his death, but declines to say them out loud, raising the prospect (dealt with at greater length in Night Watch, among many other books) that the most effective heroes are natural villains who choose to act in accordance with a particular system of ethics. The Fifth Elephant is the 24th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Night Watch is the 29th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2002. ...


Society

Many concepts of government and types of social systems are mocked in Discworld books.

John Lockes writings on the Social Contract were particularly influential among the American Founding Fathers. ... For other uses, see Revolution (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... This section is studied by Argagui monopoli In law and economics, moral hazard is the name given to the risk that one party to a contract can change their behaviour to the detriment of the other party once the contract has been concluded. ...

Miscellaneous

Pratchett's novels still hold the record for the most shoplifted books.[17] For the band Shoplifting see Shoplifting (band), for the album released by Straw, see Shoplifting (album). ...


Pratchett first explored the idea of a disc-shaped world in the novel Strata (1981). Strata is a comic science fiction novel by Terry Pratchett. ...


Characters in Discworld books have been named after real people, notably Nanny Ogg, whose first name, Gytha, is a tribute to noted British fan and filker Gytha North. Another is Colette in Maskerade, whose "fascinatin' earrings" are briefly commented on by Granny Weatherwax. This is a reference to Colette Reap, who wore "Anorankh" earrings – small figurines of an ankh wearing an anorak – to one of Pratchett's signings. But usually people appear in the books by bidding for the privilege in charity auctions. Filk is a form of music created from within fandom, and performed generally late at night at science fiction conventions. ... This article details minor Discworld concepts: concepts and ideas from the Discworld of novels by Terry Pratchett which only appear in the background, or are not well fleshed out. ...


See also

Discworld Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This article contains brief biographies for characters from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... For the 1984 album by Thomas Dolby, see The Flat Earth. ...

References

  1. ^ Terry Pratchett (1992-07-30). "Chapters". alt.fan.pratchett. (Google Groups). Retrieved on 2007-06-09.
  2. ^ Terry Pratchett (1993-09-26). "Re: Posting to TP". alt.fan.pratchett. (Google Groups). Retrieved on 2007-06-09.
  3. ^ The Discworld Reading Order Guide 1.5 - JPG showing the interrelationships between the books and series within Discworld, with suggested starts
  4. ^ http://www.nwfusion.com/news/2004/083004widernetgoldenboy.html
  5. ^ a b Alternative Nation interview
  6. ^ Theatre of Cruelty and Death and What Comes Next at Lspace.org
  7. ^ Theatre of Cruelty and Death and What Comes Next at Lspace.org
  8. ^ A Collegiate Casting-Out of Devilish Devices
  9. ^ Turntables of the Night
  10. ^ Terry Pratchett (1992-11-02). "DW Film... (was Re: Guards! Guards! play". alt.fan.pratchett. (Google Groups). Retrieved on 2007-06-09.
  11. ^ More Adaptations by Sky to follow.
  12. ^ Lords and Ladies fan movie adaptation.
  13. ^ Snowgum Films.
  14. ^ "Raimi's a Free Man, Spidey helmer signs for new flick", IGN, 10 January 2006. 
  15. ^ Sam Raimi set to direct The Wee Free Men (10 January 2006).
  16. ^ Amazon.co.uk page
  17. ^ Karen McVeigh and Lesley Walker. "Pratchett casts a bitter spell on rivals", The Scotsman, 2002-07-13. Retrieved on 2006-08-11. 

Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... A photo of a flower compressed with successively higher compression ratios from left to right. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Terry Pratchett Books, Terry Pratchett's official website
  • Discworld Monthly (free monthly newsletter about Terry Pratchett OBE and his Discworld and other novels.)
  • Lspace.org Home of the Annotated Pratchett File, which details the many references, allusions, parodies and in-jokes in the Discworld novels.
    • Discworld & Pratchett Wiki
  • Terry Pratchett Quotes archive A searchable database of quotes from Terry Pratchett's novels.
  • The Cunning Artificer's Discworld Emporium The shop for Discworld artificats including models, posters, stamps and jewellery
  • Discworld Convention The UK Discworld Convention
  • The Turtle Moves! The North American Discworld Convention
  • Nullus Anxietas The Australian Discworld Convention

Characters, locations, etc


  Results from FactBites:
 
Discworld Monthly - The free newsletter about Terry Pratchett and his Discworld novels. (403 words)
Welcome to "Discworld Monthly" the free monthly on-line newsletter about the best selling author Terry Pratchett OBE and his Discworld and other novels.
Discworld Monthly was created in May 1997 with the aim of keeping fans informed about the latest happenings in the Discworld and Terry Pratchett Fan Community.
The latest issue of Discworld Monthly Issue 127 was sent out on Wednesday 31st Octoboer 2007.
TMC Reviews: Discworld (902 words)
Having never read the Discworld series, I cannot comment on the theme from that aspect, but as far as interesting ideas, concepts, and theories go, I just have one word to describe it: Wow.
To say that Discworld is 'unique' might be going too far, but it's as close to unique that any mud I've been on has ever been.
Discworld does not pretend to be what it isn't, and in fact almost *under* sells itself.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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