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Encyclopedia > Disciple whom Jesus loved
Jesus and the Beloved Disciple, polychromed and gilded wood, c 1320
Jesus and the Beloved Disciple, polychromed and gilded wood, c 1320

The phrase the disciple whom Jesus loved or Beloved Disciple is used several times in the Gospel of John, but in none of the other accounts of Jesus. In John's gospel, it is the Beloved Disciple who asks Jesus during the Last Supper who it is that will betray him. Later at the crucifixion, Jesus tells his mother "Woman, here is your son"; that he indicates the Beloved Disciple is the common interpretation. To the Beloved Disciple he says, "Here is your mother." When Mary Magdalene discovers the empty tomb, she runs to tell the Beloved Disciple and Simon Peter. The Beloved Disciple is the first to reach the empty tomb, but Simon Peter is the first to enter. Image File history File links Jesus_johannes. ... Image File history File links Jesus_johannes. ... The Gospel of John is the fourth gospel in the canon of the New Testament, traditionally ascribed to John the Evangelist. ... Jesus (8–2 BC/BCE — 29–36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... Artistic depiction of the crucifixion of Jesus. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ... Mary Magdalene is described, both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha, as a devoted disciple of Jesus. ... Saint Peter, also known as Peter, Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha — original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose from among his original disciples. ...


In art, the Beloved Disciple is portrayed as a youth or beardless—the figure of the Student—but often mistaken for a woman. He is usually shown in major scenes from the Gospel of John, especially the crucifixion and the Last Supper. Many artists have given different interpretations of John 13:23-25. 13:1 Now before the feast of the passover, when Jesus knew that his hour was come that he should depart out of this world unto the Father, having loved his own which were in the world, he loved them unto the end. ...


Identity of the Beloved Disciple

Since the Beloved Disciple does not appear in any of the other New Testament gospels, it has been traditionally seen as a self-reference to John the Evangelist, and this remains the mainstream identification. An issue is the identification of the Evangelist with John the Apostle; that is, whether the apostle is the same man as the evangelist. (See the authorship of the Johannine works for more information on this unresolved issue.) John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... St John the Evangelist, imagined by Jacopo Pontormo, ca 1525 (Santa Felicità, Florence) John the Evangelist (? - c. ... John the Apostle (יוחנן The LORD is merciful, Standard Hebrew Yoḥanan, Tiberian Hebrew Yôḥānān) was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... El Grecos rendition of John the Apostle shows the traditional author of the Johannine works as a young man. ...


In the appendix to the gospel (John 21:24), there is an explicit testimony that the Beloved Disciple is testifying to the accounts told in John's gospel: "It is this disciple who testifies to these things and has written them, and we know that his testimony is true." Hugh J. Schonfield imagined the Disciple to be a highly placed priest in the Temple and unavailable to follow Jesus in his ministry in the north. Schonfield uses this theory to account for the Beloved Disciple's absence in the north and accounts of Jesus' ministry in the Temple during the week before the Cruxifixion. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Dr. Hugh J. Schonfield was a British Bible scholar specializing in the New Testament and the early development of the Christian religion and church. ...


As John's gospel gives the specific figure of the Beloved Disciple such an anonymous title, the title is sometimes given by modern readers to other disciples to emphasize their favor with Jesus. Some writers even suggest that the Beloved Disciple figure in the Gospel of John is Mary Magdalene, even though Mary is her own figure in the gospel and appears with the Disciple, such as in John 20. The idea of a beloved or special disciple is sometimes evocated in analysis of texts from the New Testament Apocrypha. In the Gospel of Thomas, Judas Thomas is the disciple taken aside by Jesus. In the recently rediscovered Gospel of Judas, Judas Iscariot is favored with privy enlightening information and set apart from the other apostles. In the Gospel of Mary, it is a woman named Mary (likely one of the women named Mary associated with Jesus). Another more recent interpretation draws from the Secret Gospel of Mark, existing only in fragments. In this interpretation, two scenes from Secret Mark and one at Mark 14:51-52 feature the same young man or youth who is unnamed but seems closely connected to Jesus. As the account in Secret Mark details a raising from the dead very similar to Jesus' raising of Lazarus in John 11:38-44, the young man is identified as Lazarus and fixed as the Beloved Disciple. Mary Magdalene is described, both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha, as a devoted disciple of Jesus. ... John 20 is the twentieth chapter of the Gospel of John in the Bible. ... The category of New Testament apocrypha reminds the modern reader of the wide range of responses that were engendered in the interpreting of the message of Jesus of Nazareth during the first several centuries of the Common Era, as mainstream Christianity emerged. ... The Gospel of Thomas is the modern name given to a New Testament-era apocryphon completely preserved in a papyrus Coptic manuscript discovered in 1945 at Nag Hammadi, Egypt. ... Thomas was one of the 12 apostles of Jesus. ... The Gospel of Judas is a Gnostic gospel, the text of which was partially reconstructed in 2006. ... For the American black metal band, see Judas Iscariot (band). ... The Gospel of Mary was found in the Akhmim Codex, a text acquired by Dr.Rheinhardt in Cairo in 1896. ... The Secret Gospel of Mark refers to a non-canonical gospel which is the subject of the Mar Saba letter, a previously unknown letter attributed to Clement of Alexandria which Morton Smith claimed to have found transcribed into the endpapers of a 17th century printed edition of Ignatius. ... Resurrection of Lazarus by Juan de Flandes, around 1500. ...


See also

El Grecos rendition of John the Apostle shows the traditional author of the Johannine works as a young man. ...

References

  • Charlesworth, James H. The Beloved Disciple: Whose Witness Validates the Gospel of John?. Trinity Press, 1995. ISBN 1-56338-135-4.
  • Smith, Edward R. The Disciple Whom Jesus Loved: Unveiling the Author of John's Gospel. Steiner Books/Anthroposophic Press, 2000. ISBN 0-88010-486-4.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Disciple whom Jesus loved - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (571 words)
The phrase the disciple whom Jesus loved or Beloved Disciple is used several times in the Gospel of John, but in none of the other accounts of Jesus.
Some writers even suggest that the Beloved Disciple figure in the Gospel of John is Mary Magdalene, even though Mary is her own figure in the gospel and appears with the Disciple, such as in John 20.
In the Gospel of Thomas, Judas Thomas is the disciple taken aside by Jesus.
Who was the disciple whom Jesus loved? (319 words)
The disciple whom Jesus loved is John, the son of Zebedee and brother of James.
While Jesus did not promise the disciple whom He loved long life, it would be highly unusual for Jesus to say, "If I want him to remain alive until I return, what is that to you?" if the disciple whom He loved was going to be the first disciple to die.
Jesus and John were essentially “best friends.” Jesus entrusted John with the care of His mother, gave John the vision of the transfiguration, allowed John to witness His most amazing miracles, and later gave John the Book of Revelation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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