FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Disc sander
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Sander. (Discuss)

A disc sander is a machine that consists of a circular sand paper covered wheel being electrically spun around. It is sat between two benches-the one on the front is used to put your work on. The one at the back houses the machinery that spins the wheel around. It is used chiefly to sand wooden objects so that they have smoother edges. To use, press the piece of wood up against the spinning disc gently. Turn over and do the same again. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A sander is a power tool used to smooth wood and automotive or wood finishes. ... Wind turbines A machine is any mechanical or organic device that transmits or modifies energy to perform or assist in the performance of tasks. ... The article on electrical energy is located elsewhere. ... A tree trunk as found at the Veluwe, The Netherlands Wood is derived from woody plants, notably trees but also shrubs. ...


Because of the forceful abrasive nature, it is wise to not let your fingers get too close to the spinning disc. Always wait until the disc has completely stopped before touching it.


  Results from FactBites:
 
TRADESMAN WOODWORKING POWER TOOL BASICS - BELT\DISC SANDERS (801 words)
Belt Sanders are identified by the width of the sanding belt and the diameter of the sanding disc.
The sanding disc moves at the same time as the belt, and has a side work table that can be tilted from 0' to 45 degrees for bevel sanding.
The disc sander is mostly used for edging operations and therefore you should use a coarser abrasive, usually an (80- 0) or (60-1/2) grit.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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