FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Disc jockey

A disc jockey or DJ is a person who selects and plays prerecorded music for an audience. DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey Dow Jones Either decajoule (daJ = 101 J) or decijoule (dJ = 10-1 J), both SI units of energy Deejay, a term used in Dancehall music for an emcee or lyricist. ... Methods and media for sound recording are varied and have undergone significant changes between the first time sound was actually recorded for later playback until now. ...


There are several types of disc jockeys. Radio DJs introduce and play music that is broadcast on AM, FM, shortwave or digital radio stations. Club DJs select and play music in a bar, club, disco, a rave, or even a stadium. Hip hop disc jockeys select, play and create music with multiple turntables, often to back up one or more MCs. In reggae, the disc jockey (deejay) is a vocalist who raps, toasts or chats over pre-recorded rhythm tracks while the individual choosing and playing them is referred to as a selector. [1] Mobile disc jockeys travel with portable sound systems and play at a variety of events. Discothèque redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... MasterCard logo Manchaster Town Hall MC can mean: Mini Cooper: Macao: FIPS PUB 10-4 territory code Machine, (also m/c) Manchester, England (also m/c) Mariah Carey, American songstress Marginal cost Marin Catholic Master cylinder Master of Ceremonies Rapper (also emcee), or a prefix for the names of rappers... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... A Deejay (sometimes spelled DJ) is a reggae or dancehall musician who sings and toasts to an instrumental riddim (rhythm). ... RAP may mean: the IATA airport code for Rapid City Regional Airport Rassemblement pour lalternative progressiste, a Québecois political party. ... Toasting, chatting, or DJing is the act of talking or chanting over a rhythm or beat. ... A selector can be: a Reggae DJ (who selects music to play). ...

Contents

Equipment and techniques

CDJ and M-Audio DJ equipment

DJ equipment consists of: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 590 pixelsFull resolution (2210 × 1630 pixels, file size: 456 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) // My M-Audio / Pioneer CDJ setup. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 590 pixelsFull resolution (2210 × 1630 pixels, file size: 456 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) // My M-Audio / Pioneer CDJ setup. ... Pioneer CDJ-800 MK1 CDJ is a term used to describe a CD player which operates similarly to a turntable for the purposes of DJing. ... M-Audio logo M-Audio (formerly Midiman), a business unit of Avid Technology, is a manufacturer of a variety of digital audio workstation interfaces, keyboard MIDI controllers, condenser microphones, and studio monitors, among other products. ...

  • Sound recordings in a DJs preferred medium (eg. vinyl records, compact discs, computer media files)
  • A combination of two devices, or sometimes one if playback is digital, to play sound recordings, for alternating back and forth to create a continuous playback of music (e.g. record players, compact disc players, computer media players such as an MP3 player)
  • A sound system for amplification or broadcasting of the recordings (e.g. portable audio system, PA system) or a radio broadcasting system.
  • A DJ mixer, an electronic, usually two-four channel, mixer with a crossfader used to smoothly go from one song to another (using two or more playback devices)
  • Headphones, used to listen to one recording while the other recording is being played to the audience, and
  • Optionally, a microphone, so that the DJ can introduce songs and speak to the audience.

Other equipment can be added to the basic DJ set-up (above) providing unique sound manipulations. Such devices include, but are not limited to: A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... CD redirects here. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ... Sound system has multiple meanings: A sound reinforcement system is a system for amplifying, reproducing, and sometimes recording audio. ... A live sound reproduction system has two main forms: A sound reinforcement system enhances the volume of the initial sound and will be designed so that as much as possible the listener will not realise that an artificial system is being used to make it easier for them to hear... A DJ mixer is a type of audio mixing console used by disc jockeys. ... In telecommunications a mixer is a frequency mixer. ... In radio communications, fade describes the loss of signal strength at the receiver. ... For other uses, see Headphones (disambiguation). ... Microphones redirects here. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ...

  • Electronic effects units (delay, reverb, octave, equalizer, chorus, etc). Some club DJs use a suboctave effect which creates a very low bass sound and adds it to the mix.
  • A computerised performance system, which can be used with timecode encoded vinyl/CD content to manipulate digital files on the computer in real time.
  • Multi-stylus headshells, which allow a DJ to play different grooves of the same record at the same time.
  • Special DJ digital controller hardware can manipulate digital files on a PC or laptop, by using midi signals
  • Samplers, sequencers, electronic musical keyboards (synthesizers), or drum machines.

Several techniques are used by DJs as a means to better mix and blend prerecorded music. These techniques primarily include the cueing, equalization and audio mixing of two or more sound sources. The number, complexity, and frequency of special techniques depends largely on the setting in which a DJ is working. Radio DJs are less likely to focus on music-mixing technique than club DJs, who rely on a smooth transition between songs using a range of techniques. Effects units are devices that affect the sound of an electric instrument or other audio source (such as recorded material) when plugged in to the electrical signal path the instrument or source sends, most often an electric guitar or bass guitar. ... In its general sense, delay refers to a lapse of time. ... When sound is produced in an enclosed space multiple reflections build up and blend together creating reverberation or reverb. ... For other uses, see Octave (disambiguation). ... Equalizer can mean: Equalizer, an audio processing tool. ... The chorus effect is a condition in the way people perceive nearly the same sound coming from more than one source. ... Chemical structure of the vinyl functional group. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... DJ digital controllers are MIDI controllers for playing computer based music tracks, normally at clubs or events. ... An AKAI MPC2000 sampler Playing a Yamaha SU10 Sampler A sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. ... A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... A cue is a short term for the cue stick or the cue ball. ... For information about Canadas fiscal transfer system, see Equalization payments. ... Audio mixing is used in sound recording, audio editing and sound systems to balance the relative volume and frequency content of a number of sound sources. ...


Club DJ turntable techniques include beatmatching, phrasing, and slip-cueing) to preserve energy on a dancefloor. Turntablism embodies the art of cutting, beat juggling, scratching, needle drops, phase shifting, back spinning, and more to perform the transitions and overdubs of samples in a more creative manner (though turntablism is often considered a use of the turntable as a musical instrument, rather than a tool for blending prerecorded music). Professional DJs may use harmonic mixing to choose songs that are in compatible musical keys. Beatmatching is a disc jockey technique of pitch shifting or timestretching a track to match its tempo to that of the currently playing track. ... When DJing, phrasing refers to the timing of a DJs mixes with respect to song structure. ... Slip-cueing is a DJ technique originated by Francis Grasso that consists of holding a record still with his thumb and forefinger while a protective slipmat and the steel platter of the turntable revolved underneath. ... DJ Mixer. ... In hip hop music, cutting is a disc jockey technique, originated by DJ Grandmaster Flash, which is manually queueing up duplicate copies of the same record in order to play the same passage, cutting back and forth between them. ... Beat juggling is the act of manipulating two or more identical samples (e. ... Scratching is a DJ or turntablist technique used to produce sounds for some types of music. ... The needle drop is a technique used in hip hop deejaying, probably originated by Grand Wizard Theodore. ... Definition of phase shift Phase shifting describes relative phase shift in superposing waves. ... Back spinning is a disc jockey (DJ) technique using two turntables. ... In general, a sample is a part of the total, such as one individual or a set of individuals from a population (of people or things), a small piece or amount of something larger, a number of function values of a function, or part of a song. ... DJ Mixer. ... Tonearm redirects here. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Harmonic mixing is a technique in which a DJ will perform a continuous mix between two tracks that are most often either in the same key, or their keys are a perfect fourth or perfect fifth apart, or in a subdominant or dominant relationship with the original key. ...


Types

The role of selecting and playing prerecorded music for an intended audience is the same for every disc jockey. The selected music, the audience, the setting, the preferred medium, and the level of sophistication of sound manipulation are factors that diffentiate different DJ types. Methods and media for sound recording are varied and have undergone significant changes between the first time sound was actually recorded for later playback until now. ...


Radio disc jockeys

Main article: radio personality

A radio disc jockey plays music that is broadcast across radio waves, AM and FM bands or worldwide on shortwave radio stations. Radio DJs are notable for their personalities. Because terrestrial radio usually uses program directors/music directors to generate the playlist, present-day radio DJs do not typically pick the music to play at stations. Emceeing is their primary duty. For more information see Notable Radio DJs. a Radio Personality is the modern incarnation of the disk jockey, or DJ. In the 1990s, successful radio stations began to focus less on the musical expertise of their hosts and more on the individual hosts personalities. ... AM broadcasting is radio broadcasting using Amplitude Modulation. ... The abbreviations FM, Fm, and fm may refer to: Electrical engineering Frequency modulation (FM) and its most common applications: FM broadcasting, used primarily to broadcast music and speech at VHF frequencies FM synthesis, a sound-generation technique popularized by early digital synthesizers Science Femtometre (fm), an SI measure of length... A solid-state, analog shortwave receiver Shortwave radio operates between the frequencies of 3 MHz (3,000 kHz) and 30 MHz (30,000 kHz) [1] and came to be referred to as such in the early days of radio because the wavelengths associated with this frequency range were shorter than... Notable radio disc jockeys include: Jack Armstrong (born 1946) worked at many radio stations over the US, including 50,00 watters like WKYC, Cleveland; WMEX, Boston; CHUM, Toronto; WKBW, Buffalo, and KFI, Los Angeles. ...


Club disc jockeys

This type of DJ'ing is the most popular and most recognised type of DJ'ing. Using several turntables and/or CD Decks, a club disc jockey selects and plays music in a club setting. The setting can range anywhere from a neighborhood party or a small club to a disco, a rave, or even a stadium. The main focus of club DJs is on the music they play and how they remix tracks in and out of each other or also just to add a bit of energy to a track.. They build their sets by choosing tracks to control the energy level of the crowd and use beatmixing (or "beatmatching") technique for seamless transition between tracks. For more information, see Notable Club DJs. Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... A DJ mix or DJ set is a sequence of musical tracks typically mixed together to appear as one continuous track. ... The art of playing two records at the same time so that the beats of one occur at the same time as the other. ... Beatmatching is a disc jockey technique of pitch shifting or timestretching a track to match its tempo to that of the currently playing track. ... Paul Oakenfold Judge Jules Tiësto David Mancuso (1944- ) was the founder of New York Citys first underground party, called The Loft. ...

Club DJ Paul Oakenfold cues up a song

Image File history File linksMetadata [email protected] ... Image File history File linksMetadata [email protected] ... Paul Oakenfold (born August 30, 1963 in Greenhithe, Kent[1] England) is a record producer and one of the best-known Trance DJs worldwide. ...

Hip hop disc jockeys

Main article: Turntablism

A hip-hop disc jockey is a DJ that selects, plays and creates music as a hip-hop artist and/or performer, often backing up one or more MCs. DJ Mixer. ... For other uses, see Hip hop (disambiguation). ... A Master of Ceremonies or MC (sometimes spelled emcee), sometimes called a compere or an MJ for microphone jockey, is the host of an official public or private staged event or other performance. ...


Notable hip hop disc jockeys

Jamaican-born DJ Kool Herc (born 1955), inventor of the breakbeat technique; he is considered to be "the father of hip hop culture". Grandmaster Flash (born 1958), one of the early pioneers of hip-hop DJing, cutting, and scratching. Created the Quick Mix Technique, which allowed a DJ to extend a break using two copies of the same record; essentially invented modern Turntablism. Afrika Bambaataa (born 1957), was instrumental in the development of hip-hop from its birth in the South Bronx to its international success. He also created the first hip-hop track to feature synthesizers; "The godfather of hip-hop" Categories: People stubs | Hip hop musicians | Hip hop DJs | 1955 births ... This article is about breakbeat, the electronic dance music genre. ... Joseph Biggie Grand Saddler (born January 1, 1958 in Bridgetown, Barbados), better known as Grandmaster Flash, is a American hip hop musician and DJ; one of the pioneers of hip-hop DJing, cutting, and mixing. ... Afrika Bambaataa is a DJ and community leader from the South Bronx, who was instrumental in the early development of hip hop throughout the 1970s. ...


Jazzy Jay (born 1961), pioneering DJ. Helped Rick Rubin lay the foundation for what would become Def Jam Recordings. DJ Jazzy Jeff (born 1965), of DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince (also backed Will Smith on his solo efforts). Jam Master Jay (1965-2002), founder and DJ of Run-DMC, one of the most innovative hip-hop groups of all time. DJ Clue (born Ernesto Shaw on January 8, 1975 in Queens, New York City) is a mix DJ known for his involvement in the mix tape circuit. He signed as an artist on Roc-A-Fella Records. Eric B. (born 1965), one half of duo Eric B. & Rakim, popularized the James Brown-sampled funky hip-hop of the late 1980s. Terminator X (born 1966), DJ of the highly influential hip-hop group Public Enemy. Before rapper, Redman put out albums as an MC, he DJed for several New York City groups and solo artists and even was the official DJ for a New York night club under the name DJ Red Dott. Jazzy Jay (born Jayson Byas, c. ... Frederick Jay (Rick) Rubin (born March 10, 1963 in Lido Beach, New York) is an American record producer and is currently the co-head of Columbia Records. ... Def Jam Recordings, commonly referred to as Def Jam Records or just Def Jam is an United States based hip-hop record label, owned by Universal Music Group, and operates as a part of The Island Def Jam Music Group. ... DJ Jazzy Jeff (born Jeffrey A. Townes on January 22, 1965 in Philadelphia) is an African American hip hop/R&B record producer and turntablist. ... “W. S.” redirects here. ... Jason Mizell (January 21, 1965 – October 30, 2002), known as Jam Master Jay, was the founder and DJ of Run-DMC, a highly influential hip-hop group, based in the Queens borough of New York City. ... Run-DMC is a famous hip hop crew founded by Jason Mizell (Jam Master Jay) and includes Joseph Run Simmons and Darryl DMC McDaniels, all from Hollis, Queens. ... // Ernesto Shaw (born January 8, 1975 in Jamaica, Queens, New York City, New York, USA), better known as DJ Clue?, is a Mixtape DJ known for his involvement in the Mixtape circuit and for being one of the first DJs not to mix songs in his mixtapes. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eric Barrier (Eric B.) and William Griffin (Rakim), were a hip-hop duo known as Eric B. & Rakim. ... Eric Barrier (Eric B.) and William Griffin (Rakim), were a hip-hop duo known as Eric B. & Rakim. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... Terminator X (born Norman Rogers, 25 August 1966) is best known as the producer DJ of the rap group Public Enemy, which he left in 1999. ... Public Enemy, also known as PE, is a hip hop group from Long Island, New York, known for their politically charged lyrics, criticism of the media, and active interest in the concerns of the African American community. ... Reginald Reggie Noble (born April 17, 1970), better known by his stage name Redman, is an American rapper. ... MasterCard logo Manchaster Town Hall MC can mean: Mini Cooper: Macao: FIPS PUB 10-4 territory code Machine, (also m/c) Manchester, England (also m/c) Mariah Carey, American songstress Marginal cost Marin Catholic Master cylinder Master of Ceremonies Rapper (also emcee), or a prefix for the names of rappers...


DJ Lethal, the DJ for Irish hip-hop group House of Pain who subsequently became the DJ for Limp Bizkit. DJ Qbert (born 1969), founding member of the turntablism group the Invisibl Skratch Piklz and three-time winner of the International DMC Award.Mix Master Mike (born 1970), skilled DJ of hip-hop group Beastie Boys, three-time winner of the International DMC Turntablism Award. The X-Ecutioners, a turntablist band with several collaborations with groups and artists, including Linkin Park and Xzibit. DJ Premier (born 1966), one of the duo Gang Starr. He also featured with many famous Hip-Hop artists like Nas, LL Cool J, Rakim and many others. See also: Category:Hip hop DJs Leor Dimant (born December 18, 1972 in Riga, Latvia), better known as DJ Lethal, is a turntablist and producer. ... H.O.P. on the Best Of Album cover House of Pain was an Irish-styled American hip-hop group who released three albums in the early to mid 90s before lead rapper Everlast decided to pursue his solo career again. ... Limp Bizkit (alternately written as limpbizkit) is a nu metal and rapcore band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... Q-bert (born 1969) is the performing name of Richard Quitevis, a Filipino-American DJ and music-writer. ... DJ Mixer. ... Invisibl Scratch Piklz The Invisibl Skratch Piklz were a group of Filipino-American turntablists. ... Mix Master Mike (born April 4, 1970 [1]) is an American turntablist and contributing member of the Beastie Boys. ... The Beastie Boys are a hip hop musical group from New York City consisting of Michael Mike D Diamond, Adam MCA Yauch, Adam Ad-Rock Horovitz. ... The Ecutioners is a group of hip hop DJs / turntablists from New York. ... Linkin Park is a rock band from Agoura Hills, California. ... Alvin Nathaniel Joiner (born September 18, 1974) better known by his stage name Xzibit, is an American rapper, actor, and television personality, who was born in Detroit, Michigan and was raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico by his father and stepmother. ... This biographical article or section needs additional references for verification. ... Gang Starr is an influential hip hop group that consists of Guru and DJ Premier from Brooklyn, New York. ... For other uses, see Nas (disambiguation). ... LL Cool J (born James Todd Smith III on January 14, 1968 in New York, New York) is a American hip hop artist and actor. ... Rakim (pronounced Rah-Kem) (full name Rakim Allah, born William Michael Griffin Jr. ...


Reggae disc jockeys

In reggae terms, the deejay is traditionally a vocalist who would rap, toast, or chat to a "riddim". The term "selector" is reserved for the person who performs the traditional function of a DJ, though he does not always play the music. He often just selects the record and passes it to the mixer who plays it over the sound system. Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... A Deejay (sometimes spelled DJ) is a reggae or dancehall musician who sings and toasts to an instrumental riddim (rhythm). ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... Toasting, chatting, or DJing is the act of talking or chanting over a rhythm or beat. ... A riddim is a rhythm pattern consisting basically of a drum pattern and a prominent bassline. ... Selector is the term used for a Reggae DJ (who selects a riddim), in order to distinguish them from Dancehall Deejays and Hip-hop DJs. ...


Mobile disc jockeys

Main article: Mobile disc jockey
Mobile DJ Image
Mobile DJ Image

Mobile Disc Jockeys are an extension of the original Radio disc jockeys.They travel with or go on tour with mobile sound systems and play from an extensive collection of pre-recorded content for a specific audience. In the 2000s, mobile DJs need a large selection of music, professional-grade equipment, good organizational skills, vocal talent as an MC, mixing skills, quality lighting, insurance for liability, and on-site back-up equipment.[2] In the 2000s, the role of the Mobile DJ has expanded. Many Mobile DJs have assumed additional responsibilities to ensure an event's success. These responsibilities include the roles of MC, event organizer and coordinator, lighting director, and/or sound engineer.[3] Mobile Disc Jockeys are an extension of the original Radio Disc Jockeys. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mobiledj. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mobiledj. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... MasterCard logo Manchaster Town Hall MC can mean: Mini Cooper: Macao: FIPS PUB 10-4 territory code Machine, (also m/c) Manchester, England (also m/c) Mariah Carey, American songstress Marginal cost Marin Catholic Master cylinder Master of Ceremonies Rapper (also emcee), or a prefix for the names of rappers...

Historic Image - Captain PJ
Historic Image - Captain PJ

In the past, Mobile DJs utilized vinyl records or cassettes. During the Disco era of the 1970s, demand for Mobile DJs (called Mobile Discos in the UK) soared, and top Disc Jockeys travelled with hundreds of vinyl records and cassette tapes.[2] In the 1990s, Compact Disc became the standard. Mobile Disc Jockey trade publications such as DJ Times magazine and Mobile Beat magazine were founded in this era.[3]Mobile DJs have formed professional associations such as the Canadian Disc Jockey Association (CDJA), the Canadian Online Disc Jockey Association (CODJA), the American Disc Jockey Association (ADJA), and the National Association of Mobile Entertainers[3] In the UK, associations include the National Association of Disc Jockeys (NADJ), and the South Eastern Discotheque Association (SEDA). Image File history File linksMetadata CaptPjAtSpectraWardSt76p448. ... Image File history File linksMetadata CaptPjAtSpectraWardSt76p448. ... This article is about the music genre. ... 33⅓ LP vinyl record album The vinyl record is a type of gramophone record, most popular from the 1950s to the 1990s, that was most commonly used for mass-produced recordings of music. ... For the meaning of cassette in genetics, see cassette (genetics). ... CD redirects here. ... Mobile Disc Jockeys are an extension of the original Radio Disc Jockeys. ... DJ Times is considered by some to be the bible of the industry for the professional DJ. It is a monthly publication based out of Port Washington, New York that club and mobile DJs turn to as a source for products, technologies, news and information. ... What is the Canadian Disc Jockey Association? The [Canadian Disc Jockey Association] (CDJA) is a not-for-profit Trade association for Disc Jockeys across Canada. ... N.A.M.E., the National Association of Mobile Entertainers was founded in 1996 by former ADJA Board member Bruce Keslar. ...


Timeline

Mid-1800s to 1910s

In 1857, Leon Scott invented the phonoautographin France, the first device to record sound. In 1877, Thomas Alva Edison invented the phonograph cylinder, the first device to play back recorded sound, in the United States. In 1892, Emile Berliner began commercial production of his gramophone records, the first disc record to be offered to the public. In 1906, Reginald Fessenden transmitted the first audio radio broadcast in history. Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville (1817–April 26, 1879) is best known for inventing the phonautograph, the earliest known sound recording device (which, unlike Edisons similar and later invention, was unable to play back the recordings it made). ... Edison cylinder phonograph from about 1899 The phonograph, or gramophone, was the most common device for playing recorded sound from the 1870s through the 1980s. ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 - October 18, 1931) was an inventor and businessman who developed many important devices. ... The earliest method of recording and reproducing sound was on phonograph cylinders. ... Reginald Fessenden (October 6, 1866 – July 22, 1932) was a Canadian inventor, best known for his work in early radio. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ...


In the 1910s, regular radio broadcasting began, using "live" as well as prerecorded sound. In the early radio age, content typically included comedy, drama, news, music, and sports reporting. The on-air announcers and programmers would later be known as disc jockeys. In the 1920s - "Juke-joints" became popular as a place for dancing and drinking to recorded jukebox music. In 1927, Christopher Stone became the first radio announcer and programmer in the United Kingdom, on the BBC radio station. In 1929, Thomas Edison ceased phonograph cylinder manufacture, ending the disc and cylinder rivalry. Christopher Stone became the first disc jockey in the United Kingdom, on July 7, 1927, when he first started playing records on the BBC. Categories: Stub | 1927 births ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


1930s-1950s

In 1937, American commentator Walter Winchell coined the term "disc jockey" (the combination of "disc", referring to the disc records, and "jockey", which is an operator of a machine) as a description of radio announcer Martin Block, the first announcer to become a star. While his audience was awaiting developments in the Lindbergh kidnapping, Block played records and created the illusion that he was broadcasting from a ballroom, with the nation’s top dance bands performing live. The show, which he called Make Believe Ballroom, was an instant hit. In the 1940s, Musique concrète composers used portions of sound recordings to create new compositions. This is the first occurrence of sampling. Walter Winchell (April 7, 1897 – February 20, 1972), an American newspaper and radio commentator, invented the gossip column at the New York Evening Graphic. ... Martin Block (1901-1967) was the first radio disc jockey to become a star in his own right. ... Lindbergh baby kidnapping poster. ... Musique concrète (French; literally, concrete music), is a style of avant-garde music that relies on natural environmental sounds and other non-musical noises to create music. ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ...


In 1943, Jimmy Savile launched the world's first DJ dance party by playing jazz records in the upstairs function room of the Loyal Order of Ancient Shepherd's in Otley, England. In 1947, he became the first DJ to use twin turntables for continuous play. In 1947, the "Whiskey-A-Go-Go" nightclub opened in Paris, France, considered to be the world's first discothèque, or disco (deriving its name from the French word, meaning a nightclub where the featured entertainment is recorded music rather than an on-stage band). Discos began appearing across Europe and the United States. From the late 1940s to early 1950s, the introduction of television eroded the popularity of radio's early format, causing it to take on the general form it has today, with a strong focus on music, news and sports. Sir Jimmy Savile. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Otley on a market day, looking up Kirkgate with The Chevin in the background Otley is a town in northern England by the River Wharfe. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... For the Young Love song, see Discotech (song). ...


In the 1950s - American radio DJs would appear live at "sock hops" and "platter parties" and assume the role of a human jukebox. They would usually play 45-rpm records featuring hit singles on one turntable, while talking between songs. In some cases, a live drummer was hired to play beats between songs to maintain the dance floor. 1955 - Bob Casey, a well-known "sock hop" DJ, introduces the first two-turntable system for alternating back and forth between records, creating a continuous playback of music. Throughout the 1950s, payola payments by record companies to DJs in return for airplay was an ongoing problem. Part of the fallout from the payola scandal was tighter control of the music by station management. The Top 40 format emerged, where popular songs are played repeatedly. Payola, in the American music industry, is the illegal practice of payment or other inducement by record companies for the broadcast of recordings on music radio, in which the song is presented as being part of the normal days broadcast. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ...


In the late 1950s - sound systems, a new form of public entertainment, are developed in the ghettos of Kingston, Jamaica. Promoters, who called themselves DJs, would throw large parties in the streets that centered on the disc jockey, called the "selector", who played dance music from large, loud PA systems and bantered over the music with a boastful, rhythmic chanting style called "toasting". These parties quickly became profitable for the promoters, who would sell admission, food and alcohol, leading to fierce competition between DJs for the biggest sound systems and newest records. A reggae sound system is a group of disc jockeys, engineers and MCs playing reggae music. ... For the rapper, see Ghetto (rapper). ... The City of Kingston is the capital and largest city of Jamaica. ... Toasting, chatting, or DJing is the act of talking or chanting over a rhythm or beat. ...


1960s and 1970s

In the mid-1960s, nightclubs and discotheques continued to grow in Europe and the United States. Specialized DJ equipment such as Rudy Bozak's classic CMA-10-2DL mixer began to appear on the market. In 1969, American club DJ Francis Grasso popularized beatmatching at New York's Sanctuary nightclub. Beatmatching is the technique of creating seamless transitions between back-to-back records with matching beats, or tempos. Grasso also developed slip-cueing, the technique of holding a record still while the turntable is revolving underneath, releasing it at the desired moment to create a sudden transition from the previous record. Rudy T. Bozak was a designer and technician in the field of music reproduction. ... Francis Grasso was an American disc jockey from New York City, best known for inventing the technique of slip-cueing and later beatmatching which is the foundation of the modern club djs technique. ... Beatmatching is a disc jockey technique of pitch shifting or timestretching a track to match its tempo to that of the currently playing track. ... This article is about the state. ... Slip-cueing is a DJ technique originated by Francis Grasso that consists of holding a record still with his thumb and forefinger while a protective slipmat and the steel platter of the turntable revolved underneath. ...


By 1968, the number of dance clubs started to decline; most American clubs either closed or were transformed into clubs featuring live bands. Neighborhood block parties that were modeled after Jamaican sound systems gained popularity in Europe and in the boroughs of New York City. Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


During the early 1970s, the economic downturn led most of the dance clubs to become underground gay discos. In 1973, Jamaican-born DJ Kool Herc, widely regarded as the "godfather of hip hop culture", performed at block parties in his Bronx neighborhood and developed a technique of mixing back and forth between two identical records to extend the rhythmic instrumental segment, or break. Turntablism, the art of using turntables not only to play music, but to manipulate sound and create original music, began to develop. GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... For the New York City neighborhood, see Jamaica, Queens. ... Categories: People stubs | Hip hop musicians | Hip hop DJs | 1955 births ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Break. ... DJ Mixer. ...


In 1974, Technics released the first SL-1200 turntable, which evolved into the SL-1200 MK2 in 1979, which as of the mid-2000s remains the industry standard for deejaying. In 1974, German electronic music band Kraftwerk released the 22-minute song "Autobahn", which takes up the entire first side of that LP. Years later, Kraftwerk would become a significant influence on hip hop artists such as Afrika Bambaataa and house music pioneer Frankie Knuckles. During the mid 1970s, Hip hop music and culture began to emerge, originating among urban African Americans and Latinos in New York City. The four main elements of hip hop culture were MCing (rapping), DJing, graffiti, and breakdancing. Technics is a brand name of the Japanese company Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. ... Technics SL-1200MK2 The Technics SL-1200 is a series of turntables manufactured since October 1972 by Matsushita under the brand name of Technics. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Kraftwerk (pronounced [], German for power station) is a German musical group from Düsseldorf that has made immense contributions to the development of improvisational rock and electronic music, most notably within the latter categorys sub-genres which later became known as synthpop, electro, techno, house and IDM. Early musical... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Afrika Bambaataa is a DJ and community leader from the South Bronx, who was instrumental in the early development of hip hop throughout the 1970s. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Frankie Knuckles (born January 18, 1955, in New York City) is a DJ, producer and remix artist. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... Hip hop is a subculture, which is said to have begun with the work of DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, and Afrika Bambaattaa. ... Rap redirects here. ... For other uses, see Graffiti (disambiguation). ... A boy hitting (holding) a pike Breakdance (media coined phrase), also known as breaking, b-girling or b-boying, is a street dance style that evolved as part of the hip hop movement that originated among African American youths in the South Bronx of New York City during the early...


In the mid-1970s, the soul-funk blend of dance pop known as Disco took off in the mainstream pop charts in the United States and Europe, causing discotheques to experience a rebirth. Unlike many late 1960s, clubs, which featured live bands, discotheques used the DJs selection and mixing of records as the entertainment. In 1975, Record pools began, enabling disc jockeys access to newer music from the industry in an efficient method. This article is about the music genre. ... A discothèque (or discoteque) (pronounced disko-tek) is an entertainment venue or club with recorded music, played by Discaires (Disk jockeys), rather than an on-stage band. ... A record pool commonly refers to a regionalized and centralized method of music distribution that allows a DJ to receive promotional music to play in nightclubs. ...


In 1976, American DJ, editor, and producer Walter Gibbons remixed "Ten Percent" by Double Exposure, one of the earliest commercially released 12" singles (aka "maxi-single"). In 1977, Hip hop DJ Grand Wizard Theodore invented the scratching technique by accident. In 1979, the Sugar Hill Gang released "Rapper's Delight", the first hip hop record to become a hit. It was also the first real breakthrough for sampling, as the bassline of Chic's "Good Times" laid the foundation for the song. Walter Gibbons (1954 - 1994) was an American record producer and remixer. ... In film and photography, double exposure is a technique in which a piece of film is exposed twice, to two different images. ... Grand Wizard Theodore (left). ... Scratching is a DJ or turntablist technique used to produce sounds for some types of music. ... The Sugarhill Gang is an American hip hop group, known mostly for one hit, Rappers Delight, the first hip hop single to become a Top 40 hit. ... Rappers Delight is a 1979 single by American hip hop trio The Sugarhill Gang; it was one of the first hip hop hit singles. ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... For other uses, see Chic. ... Good Times is a song by the band CHIC, recorded for their 1979 album Risqué. In August of that year, it became the bands second #1 single on the Billboard Hot 100. ...


In 1977, Saratoga Springs, NY disc jockey Tom L. Lewis introduced the Disco Bible (later renamed Disco Beats) which published hit disco songs listed by the beats-per-minute (the tempo), as well as by either artist or song title. Billboard ran an article on the new publication and it went national relatively quickly. Making this concept more public made it easier for beginner DJs to learn how they could create seemless transitions between songs without dancers having to change their rhythm on the dance floor.


1980s

In 1981, the cable television network MTV was launched, originally devoted to music videos, especially popular rock music. The term "video jockey", or VJ, was used to describe the fresh faced youth who introduced the music videos. In 1982, the demise of disco in the mainstream by the summer of 1982 forced many nightclubs to either close or to change entertainment styles, such as by providing MTV style video dancing or live bands. Released in 1982, the song "Planet Rock" by DJ Afrika Bambaataa was the first hip-hop song to feature synthesizers. The song melded electronic hip hop beats with the melody from Kraftwerk's "Trans-Europe Express". In 1982, the compact disc reached the public market in Asia and early the following year in other markets. This event is often seen as the "Big Bang" of the digital audio revolution. This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Video Jockey or VJ is a term coined in the early 1980s to describe the fresh faced youth who introduced the music videos on MTV. The word VJ is also used to represent video performance artists who create live visuals on all kind of music. ... Afrika Bambaataa is a DJ and community leader from the South Bronx, who was instrumental in the early development of hip hop throughout the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Synthesizer (disambiguation). ... CD redirects here. ... Digital audio comprises audio signals stored in a digital format. ...


In the early 1980s, NYC disco DJ Larry Levan, known for his eclectic mixes, gained a cult following; and the Paradise Garage, the nightclub at which he spun, became the prototype for the modern dance club where the music and the DJ were showcased. Around the same time, the disco-influenced electronic style of dance music called House music emerged in Chicago. The name was derived from the Warehouse club in Chicago, where the resident DJ, Frankie Knuckles, mixed old disco classics and Eurosynth pop. House music is essentially disco music with electronic drum machine beats. The common element of most house music is a 4/4 beat generated by a drum machine or other electronic means (such as a sampler), together with a solid (usually also electronically generated) synth bassline. In 1983, Jesse Saunders released what some consider the first house music track, "On & On". The mid-1980s also saw the emergence of New York Garage, a house music hybrid that was inspired by Levan's style and sometimes eschewed the accentuated high-hats of the Chicago house sound. Larry Levan (born Lawrence Philpot, July 20, 1954 – died November 8, 1992, of AIDS) stands at the crossroads of disco, house music and garage music. ... The former home of the Paradise Garage on King Street. ... This article is about the music genre. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... A warehouse club is a retail store selling a small amount of merchandise in terms of variety. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... Frankie Knuckles (born January 18, 1955, in New York City) is a DJ, producer and remix artist. ... A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... An AKAI MPC2000 sampler Playing a Yamaha SU10 Sampler A sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. ... In popular music a bassline, also bass line, is an instrumental part, or line, which is in the bass or lowest range and thus lower than the other parts and part of the rhythm section. ... Using a blueprint of old school funk, disco, R&B, new wave, classic rock, pop and electronic hip-hop, Jesse Saunders [1] architected the musical style known as House Music. ... New York house, also known as New York garage, US garage or just garage, is a style of house music born in the Paradise Garage nightclub in New York City, USA in the early 1980s. ... Chicago house is a style of house music. ...


During the mid-1980s, Techno music emerged from the Detroit club scene. Being geographically located between Chicago and New York, Detroit techno artists combined elements of Chicago house and New York garage along with European imports. Techno distanced itself from disco's roots by becoming almost purely electronic with synthesized beats. In 1985, the Winter Music Conference started in Fort Lauderdale Florida and becomes the premier electronic music conference for dance music disc jockeys. Techno is a form of electronic dance music that became prominent in Detroit, Michigan during the mid-1980s with influences from electro, New Wave, Funk and futuristic fiction themes that were prevalent and relative to modern culture during the end of the Cold War in industrial America at that time. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Fort Lauderdale, known as the Venice of America, is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ...


In 1985, TRAX Dance Music Guide was launched by American Record Pool in Beverly Hills. It was the first national DJ-published music magazine, created on the Macintosh computer using extensive music market research and early desktop publishing tools. In 1986, "Walk This Way", a rap-rock collaboration by Run DMC and Aerosmith, became the first hip-hop song to reach the Top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100. This song was the first exposure of hip hop music, as well as the concept of the disc jockey as band member and artist, to many mainstream audiences. In 1988, DJ Times magazine was first published. It was the first US-based magazine specifically geared toward the professional mobile and club DJ. For other uses, see Macintosh (disambiguation) and Mac. ... Walk This Way is a song by American hard rock group Aerosmith. ... Run-DMC is a hip hop crew founded by Jason Jam Master Jay Mizell that included Joseph Run Simmons and Darryl DMC McDaniels. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... DJ Times is considered by some to be the bible of the industry for the professional DJ. It is a monthly publication based out of Port Washington, New York that club and mobile DJs turn to as a source for products, technologies, news and information. ...


Starting in the mid 1980s, the wedding and banquet business changed dramatically with the introduction of DJ music , replacing the bands that had been the norm. Band Leaders like Jerry Perell and others, started DJ companies, like NY Rhythm DJ Entertainers. Using their knowledge of audience participation, MC charisma and "crowd pleasing" repertory selection, the wedding music industry became almost all DJ, while combining the class and elegance of the traditional band presentation. New DJs as well as Band Leaders with years of experience and professionalism transformed the entire industry. Now everyone loves a good banquet DJ. The latest trend is to combine real musicians with the DJ music for a more personal and artistic approach.


1990s-2000s

During the early 1990s, the rave scene built on the acid house scene. Some DJs, wanting to be the only source for hearing certain tunes, used "white labels" — records with no info printed on them — in an effort to prevent other trainspotters from learning what they were spinning. The rave scene changed dance music, the image of DJs, and the nature of promoting. The innovative marketing surrounding the rave scene created the first superstar DJs who established marketable "brands" around their names and sound. Some of these celebrity DJs toured around the world and were able to branch out into other music-related activities. For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... For the 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, see The Acid House. ... This is about the Arabic television series. ...


During the early 1990s, the compact disc surpassed the gramophone record in popularity, but gramophone records continued to be made (although in very limited quantities) into the 21st century, particularly for club DJs and for local acts recording on small regional labels. During the mid-1990s, trance music, having run rampant in the German underground for several years, emerged as a major force in dance music throughout Europe and the UK. It became one of the world's most dominant forms dance music by the end of the 1990s, thanks to a trend away from its repetitive, hypnotic roots, and towards commercialistic song structure. CD redirects here. ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ...


In 1991, Mobile Beat magazine, geared specifically for mobile DJs, began publishing. In 1992, MPEG which stands for the Moving Picture Experts Group, released The MPEG-1 standard, designed to produce reasonable sound at low bit rates. The lossy compression scheme MPEG-1 Layer-3, popularly known as MP3, later revolutionized the digital music domain. In 1993, the first Internet "radio station", Internet Talk Radio, was developed by Carl Malamud. Because the audio was relayed over the Internet, it was possible to access internet radio stations from anywhere in the world. This made it a popular service for both amateur and professional disc jockeys operating from a personal computer. The Moving Picture Experts Group or MPEG is a working group of ISO/IEC charged with the development of video and audio encoding standards. ... The is a working group of ISO/IEC charged with the development of video and audio encoding standards. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ...


In 1995, the first full-time, Internet-only radio station, Radio HK, began broadcasting the music of independent bands. In 1996, Mobile Beat had its first national mobile DJ convention in Las Vegas. During the late 1990s, nu metal bands, such as Korn, Limp Bizkit, and Linkin Park, reached the height of their popularity. This new subgenre of alternative rock bore some influence from hip-hop, because rhythmic innovation and syncopation are primary, often featuring DJs as band members. As well, during the late 1990s, various DJ and VJ software programs were developed, allowing personal computer users to deejay or veejay using his or her personal music or video files. Nu metal (also called aggro metal, or nü metal using the traditional heavy metal umlaut) is a musical genre that has origins in the mid 1990s. ... This article is about the band. ... Limp Bizkit (alternately written as limpbizkit) is a nu metal and rapcore band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... Linkin Park is a rock band from Agoura Hills, California. ... Alternative music redirects here. ...


In 1998, the first MP3 digital audio player was released, the Eiger Labs MPMan F10. In 1999, Shawn Fanning released Napster, the first of the massively popular peer-to-peer file sharing systems. During this period, the AVLA (Audio Video Licensing Agency) of Canada announced an MP3 DJing license, administered by the Canadian Recording Industry Association. This meant that DJs could apply for a license giving them the right to "burn" their own compilation CDs of "usable tracks", instead of having to cart their whole CD collections around to their gigs. Shawn Napster Fanning (born November 22, 1980, Brockton, Massachusetts[1]), is a computer programmer. ... Napster was a file sharing service that paved the way for decentralized P2P file-sharing programs such as Kazaa, Limewire, iMesh, Morpheus, and BearShare, which are now used for many of the same reasons and can download music, pictures, and other files. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ...

By the 2000s, play lists became tightly regulated, and new technologies such as voice tracking, allowed single DJs to send announcements across many stations. Some music aficionados seek out freeform stations that put the DJs back in control, or end up dumping terrestrial radio in favor of satellite radio services or portable music players. College radio stations and other public radio outlets are the most common places for freeform play lists in the U.S. Voice tracking, also called cyber jocking and referred to sometimes colloquially as a robojock, is a technique employed by some radio stations to produce the illusion of a live disc jockey or announcer sitting in the studios of the station when one is not actually present. ... Freeform, or freeform radio, is a radio station programming format in which the disc jockey is given total control over what music to play, regardless of music genre or commercial interests. ... // A satellite radio or subscription radio (SR) is a digital radio signal that is broadcast by a communications satellite, which covers a much wider geographical range than terrestrial radio signals. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ...


In 2001, Apple Computer's iPod was introduced and quickly became the highest selling brand of portable digital mp3 audio player. The convenience and popularity of the iPod spawns a new type of DJ, the self-penned "MP3J". First appearing in certain East London clubs, and spreading to other music scenes, including New York City, this new DJ scene allowed the average music fan to bring two iPods to an "iPod Night", plug in to the mixer, and program a play list without the skill and equipment demanded by a more traditional DJ setup, and without needing to bring a heavy case of CDs. In 2006, the concept of DJ had its 100 year anniversary. In 2006, Mobile Beat Magazine and ProDJ.Com merged, creating a new resource for mobile disc jockeys. Apple Inc. ... A grayscale fourth-generation iPod with earphones. ... East London area East London is the name commonly given to the north eastern part of London, England on the north side of the River Thames. ...


Etymology

The term disc jockey was first used to describe radio announcers who would introduce and play popular gramophone records. These records, also called discs by those in the industry, were jockeyed by the radio announcers, hence the name disc jockey, which was soon shortened to DJs or deejays. Today, there are a number of factors, including the selected music, the intended audience, the performance setting, the preferred medium, and the development of sound manipulation, that have led to different types of disc jockeys. However, today there are many different kinds of 'DJs' and it does not always mean 'disc jockey' in the traditional sense; for example, turntablist DJs use actual 'discs' whilst radio DJs may use a number of sound sources including music files, CDs, jingles, and other pre-recorded media. As of 2007, many club DJs have begun playing sets almost entirely on CDJs, on compact disc instead of using vinyl. There are also DJ's that have all their music set up in special computer programs. This makes it even easier to set up a show without lugging extra boxes of CD's around.


Bibliography

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Disc jockey
  • Poschardt, Ulf (1998). DJ Culture. London: Quartet Books. ISBN 0-7043-8098-6
  • Brewster, Bill & Broughton, Frank (2000). Last Night a DJ Saved My Life: The History of the Disc Jockey. New York: Grove Press. ISBN 0-8021-3688-5 (North American edition). London: Headline. ISBN 0-7472-6230-6 (UK edition).
  • Lawrence, Tim (2004). Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979 . Duke University Press. ISBN 0-8223-3198-5.
  • Assef, Claudia (2000). Todo DJ Já Sambou: A História do Disc-Jóquei no Brasil. São Paulo: Conrad Editora do Brasil. ISBN 85-87193-94-5.
  • Graudins, Charles A. How to Be a DJ. Boston: Course Technology PTR, 2004.
  • Zemon, Stacy. The Mobile DJ Handbook: How to Start & Run a Profitable Mobile Disc Jockey Service, Second Edition. St. Louis: Focal Press, 2002.
  • Broughton, Frank and Bill Brewster. How to DJ Right: The Art and Science of Playing Records. New York: Grove Press, 2003.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

See also

For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Technics is a brand name of the Japanese company Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. ... Technics SL-1200MK2 The Technics SL-1200 is a series of turntables manufactured since October 1972 by Matsushita under the brand name of Technics. ... DJ digital controllers are MIDI controllers for playing computer based music tracks, normally at clubs or events. ... Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... A VJ is a performance artist who creates moving visual art (namely video) on large displays or screens, often at events such as concerts, nightclubs and music festivals, and usually in conjunction with other performance art. ... DJ Mixer. ... Edison cylinder phonograph from about 1899 The phonograph, or gramophone, was the most common device for playing recorded sound from the 1870s through the 1980s. ... A 12-inch record (left), a 7-inch record (right), and a CD (above) Two 7 singles (left), two colored 7 singles (middle), and two 7 singles with large spindle holes (right). ... Look up disc, disk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... Live PA Live PA, sometimes written LivePA, meaning Live Performance Artist or Personal Appearance is a term used to describe the act of performing music (mostly electronic) live. ... Computer DJ is defined as a DJ who uses a computer or laptop to play digital music either . ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Rap redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... DJ Mixer. ... Hip hop is a subculture, which is said to have begun with the work of DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, and Afrika Bambaattaa. ... A boy hitting (holding) a pike Breakdance (media coined phrase), also known as breaking, b-girling or b-boying, is a street dance style that evolved as part of the hip hop movement that originated among African American youths in the South Bronx of New York City during the early... For other uses, see Graffiti (disambiguation). ... Faada Freddy of the Senegalese rap crew Daara J in Germany, 2005. ... Breakdance, the first hip hop dance style, performed at MTV Street Festival, Thailand. ... // In Hip hop music, people individually and separately vocalize over beats, instrumental tracks, usually consisting of repeated phrases. ... The roots of hip hop can be found in 1970s block parties in New York City, specifically The Bronx[1]. Hip hop culture, including rapping, scratching, graffiti, and breakdancing. ... Old school hip hop is a term used to describe the very earliest hip hop music to come out of the block parties of New York City in the 1970s and 1980s. ... The golden age of hip hop, derivative of old school hip hop, was probably introduced with the popularity of Run-DMCs 1986 album Raising Hell. ... New school hip hop is a rarely-heard term referring to hip hop created later in the forms development, contrasted with old school hip hop. ... See also: Category:Hip hop genres Hip hop music can be subdivided into subgenres, fusions with other genres and regional hip hop scenes. ... This is a list of influential albums in the history of hip hop music. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Hip hop music has been popular in Africa since the early 1980s due to widespread American influence. ... Cover of sampler CD (2003) This article is about hip hop music and culture originating in the Arabic-speaking world. ... Asian Hip Hop is a heterogeneous musical genre that covers all hip hop music as recorded and produced by artists of Asian origin. ... European hip hop is hip hop music created by European musicians. ... Latin rap is not a homogeneous musical style but rather a term that covers all Hip-Hop music recorded by artists of Latino origin. ... Middle Eastern hip hop is hip hop music and culture originating in the Middle East. ... Hip hop is quite a new style of music for Bosnia and Herzegovina, but it has nevertheless proven very popular. ... The capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kinsasha, has long been a major home for pan-African styles of popular music like rumba, soukous and kwassa kwassa. ... Ivoirian hip hop is a major part of the popular music of Côte dIvoire, and has been fused with many of the countrys native styles, such as zouglou. ... Native American hip hop is popular among Native Americans in the United States and the First Nations of Canada. ... Serbian hip hop started in the early 80s, with the birth of b-boy crews and their battles which have spread over the country in no time. ... Taiwanese hip hop music started in the early 1990s, popularized by early hip hop trio L.A. Boyz. ...

References

  1. ^ Last Night a DJ Saved My Life, written by Bill Brewster and Frank Broughton, Published by Headline, updated 2006
  2. ^ a b Graudins, Charles A. How to Be a DJ. Boston: Course Technology PTR, 2004.
  3. ^ a b c Zemon, Stacy. The Mobile DJ Handbook: How to Start & Run a Profitable Mobile Disc Jockey Service, Second Edition. St. Louis: Focal Press, 2002.

External links

  • DJs at the Open Directory Project
  • BBC Blast - How to become a DJ
  • BBC Blast - Learn how to scratch with DJ Max Cooper

  Results from FactBites:
 
Disc jockey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5278 words)
These records, also called discs by those in the industry, were jockeyed by the radio announcers, hence the name disc jockey, which was soon shortened to DJs or deejays.
The Canadian Disc Jockey Association (CDJA) was one of the original associations formed in 1976 as a not-for-profit trade association for disc jockeys across Canada.
Professor Jam, a Tampa Bay, Florida disc jockey already known in the industry for having performed for many celebrities and television networks, became one of the first mobile DJs in the United States to regularly use computer technology to play music at his shows, and was the first professionally endorsed computer disc jockey internationally.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m