FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Diomedes" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Diomedes

Diomēdēs or Diomed (Gk:Διομήδης - "God-like cunning" or "advised by Zeus") is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. He was born to Tydeus and Deipyle and later became King of Argos, succeeding his grandfather, Adrastus. In Homer's Iliad Diomedes is regarded alongside Ajax as the second-best warriors of all the Achaeans. He, his paternal uncle Heracles and his close companion Odysseus are the favoured heroes of Athena. In Virgil's Aeneid he is one of the warriors who entered the Trojan Horse shortly before the sack of Troy. Greek ( IPA: or IPA: — Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in that language family. ... Heroine (female hero) redirects here. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... In Greek mythology, Tydeus was the father of Diomedes and husband of Deipyle. ... In Greek mythology, Deipyle was the daughter of Adrastus and Amphithea, mother of Diomedes and wife of Tydeus. ... Coordinates 37°37′ N 22°43′ E Country Greece Periphery Peloponnese Prefecture Argolis Province Argos Population 29,505 Area 5. ... In Greek mythology, Adrastus, or Adrastos (he who stands his ground, son of Talaus) was one of the three kings at Argos, along with Iphis and Amphiaraus, who was married to Adrastus sister Eriphyle. ... Homer (Greek: , ) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... Aias (Greek: ), or Ajax, king of Salamis, a legendary hero of ancient Greece. ... The Achaeans (in Greek , Achaioi) is the collective name given to the Greek forces in Homers Iliad (used 598 times). ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) For other uses, see Heracles (disambiguation). ... Head of Odysseus from a Greek 2nd century BC marble group representing Odysseus blinding Polyphemus, found at the villa of Tiberius at Sperlonga Odysseus or Ulysses (Greek Odysseys; Latin: Ulixes or, less commonly, Ulysses), pronounced , is the main hero in Homers epic poem, the Odyssey, and plays a key... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story... // For other uses, see Trojan Horse (disambiguation). ...

Sculpture of Athena counseling Diomedes shortly before he enters the battle - (Schlossbrücke, Berlin)
Sculpture of Athena counseling Diomedes shortly before he enters the battle - (Schlossbrücke, Berlin)

Contents

Image File history File links Athéna_et_Diomède. ... Image File history File links Athéna_et_Diomède. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ...

Early myths

Prior to his adventures in Troy, Diomedes is remembered for being one of the Epigoni, the sons of the warrior-kings who fell on the Seven Against Thebes. The Epigoni organized a military expedition that was meant to avenge their fathers' deaths by ceding the Kingdom of Thebes, Greece. After Tydeus' death, Diomedes married an Argive woman and settled in Argos. Even as a permanent citizen of Argos, Diomedes would still spy and interfere with the affairs of his father's Calydonian homeland that was ruled by his grandfather Oeneus. Eventually, a conspiracy was organized by a man named Thersites aiming to overthrow the King. Thersites had Oeneus put in jail and his father to the throne. Diomedes attacked and ceded the Kingdom, slaying all traitors except Thersites who managed to escape, restoring his grandfather to the throne. Later on when Oeneus passed the Kingdom to his son-in-law Andraemon, he headed for Argos to meet Diomedes but was assassinated on the way by Thersites. Unable to find the murderers, Diomedes founded a mythical city called Oenoe at the place where his grandfather was buried to honour his death. Later during the Trojan War, Thersites was brutally slain by Achilles after having mocked him when the latter cried over Penthesilia's dead body. Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... This is an article about the Greek myth. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Επτά επί Θήβας The Seven Against Thebes is a mythic narrative that finds its classic statement in the play by Aeschylus (467 BCE) concerning the battle between the Seven led by Polynices and the army of Thebes headed by Eteocles and his supporters, traditional Theban... Thebes (in Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva, Katharevousa: — ThÄ“bai or Thíve) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... Calydon (Greek Καλυδών) was an ancient Greek city in Aetolia, situated on the west bank of the river Evenus. ... In Greek mythology, Oeneus, or Oineus was a Calydonian king, son of Porthaon, husband of Althaea and father of Deianira, Meleager and Melanippe. ... In Greek mythology, Thersites, son of Agrius, was a rank-and-file soldier of the Greek army during the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Andraemon, or Andraimôn, was the husband of Dryope. ... The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (1821–1859) (Musée Fabre) In Greek mythology, Achilles (also Akhilleus or Achilleus) (Ancient Greek: ) was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homers Iliad, which takes for its theme, not the War... In Greek mythology, Penthesilea (also spelled Penthesilia) was an Amazonian queen, daughter of Ares and Otrera, sister of Hippolyte. ...


Diomedes is also known for being one of the suitors of Helen, and therefore bound by the Oath of Tyndareus to defend and protect the one who would become her husband. Thus Diomedes and all the suitors eventually participated in the Mycenaean expedition against Troy. Helen was the wife of Menelaus and reputed to be the most beautiful woman in the world, and her abduction by Paris brought about the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Tyndareus (or Tyndareos) was a Spartan king, son of Oebalus (or Perieres) and Gorgophone (or Bateia), husband of Leda and father of Helen, Polydeuces (Pollux), Castor, Clytemnestra, Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ...


Trojan War

According to Homer, Diomedes enters the war with a fleet of 80 ships, second only to the contributions of Agamemnon (100 ships) and Nestor (90). According to some interpretations, Diomedes is represented in the epic as the most valiant soldier of the war, who never commits hubris. He's often referred to by Homer as the youngest amongst the Achaean warrior-Kings, and yet the most powerful fighter, only bested by Achilles. On other occasions Ajax is also characterized as the second best warrior of the Achaean force. However during Patroclus' funeral games, Diomedes beat Ajax to win the first place in the armed sparring tournament. Apart from his outstanding fighting abilities and courage, Diomedes is in several crucial occasions shown to possess great wisdom, which is acknowledged and respected by his much older comrades, including Agamemnon and Nestor. Instances of Diomedes' maturity and intelligence as they can be seen in parts of the epic: Homer (Greek: , ) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... The so-called Mask of Agamemnon. Discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae. ... The word may have one of the following meanings. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Aias (Greek: ), or Ajax, king of Salamis, a legendary hero of ancient Greece. ... A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... The so-called Mask of Agamemnon. Discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae. ... The word may have one of the following meanings. ... The epic is a broadly defined genre of poetry, and one of the major forms of narrative literature. ...

  • In Book IV Agamemnon taunts Diomedes by calling him a much inferior fighter than his father. One of his enraged comrades enforces Diomedes to stand up to Agamemnon by responding that he has bested his father and avenged his death by conquering "Seven-gated" Thebes. Diomedes responded that it was part of Agamemnon's tasks as a leader to urge forward the Achaean soldiers, and that men of valour should have no problem withstanding such kind of insults.
  • but they all held their peace, till at last Diomed of the loud battle-cry made answer saying, "Son of Atreus, I will chide your folly, as is my right in council. Be not then aggrieved that I should do so..." Achaean council - Book IX
  • "The sons of the Achaeans shouted applause at the words of Diomed, and presently Nestor rose to speak. "Son of Tydeus," said he, "in war your prowess is beyond question, and in council you excel all who are of your own years; no one of the Achaeans can make light of what you say nor gainsay it, but you have not yet come to the end of the whole matter. You are still young- you might be the youngest of my own children- still you have spoken wisely and have counselled the chief of the Achaeans not without discretion;" Achaean council - Book IX

Instances of Diomedes' valour and expertise in battle according to quotations:

  • "As he (Diomedes) spoke he sprang from his chariot, and his armour rang so fiercely about his body that even a brave man might well have been scared to hear it." - Book IV
  • "Diomed looked angrily at him and answered: "Talk not of flight, for I shall not listen to you: I am of a race that knows neither flight nor fear, and my limbs are as yet unwearied. I am in no mind to mount, but will go against them even as I am;" Battle with Aeneas and Pandarus - Book V
  • "But the son of Tydeus caught up a mighty stone, so huge and great that as men now are it would take two to lift it; nevertheless he bore it aloft with ease unaided," Battle with Aeneas - Book V
  • ""Father Jove, grant that the lot fall on Ajax, or on the son of Tydeus, or upon the king of rich Mycene himself." Duel of Hector - Book VII
  • "The old man instantly began cutting the traces with his sword, but Hector's fleet horses bore down upon him through the rout with their bold charioteer, even Hector himself, and the old man would have perished there and then had not Diomed been quick to mark" Saving Nestor - Book VII
  • "They all held their peace, but Diomed of the loud war-cry spoke saying, "Nestor, gladly will I visit the host of the Trojans over against us, but if another will go with me I shall do so in greater confidence and comfort. When two men are together, one of them may see some opportunity which the other has not caught sight of; if a man is alone he is less full of resource, and his wit is weaker." Achaean plans - Book X

Book V of the Iliad is centered on the battlefield valour of Diomedes, who during the absence of Achilles, becomes the mightiest soldier of the Achaean army by spreading havoc among the Trojan ranks. Diomedes enters the battle, slays a handful of Trojan soldiers, including some of Priam's sons, causing thus fear to many others. He's spotted and attacked by two of the elite Trojan soldiers, the demi-God Aeneas (son of Aphrodite) and the archer Pandarus. Pandarus shoots an arrow and injures Diomedes, but his battle abilities are not much affected. Diomedes kills Pandarus with his spear and throws a great rock on Aeneas, who gets seriously injured. Aphrodite enters the battle in an attempt to save the life of her son, whom she grabs and manages to escape with. Diomedes attacks and injures Aphrodite, who starts crying, drops Aeneas and heads to Mount Olympus to complain to Zeus. Meanwhile Apollo grabs the unconscious body of Aeneas and tries to walk away. Diomedes attacks him three times and is repelled by a flashing light. On his fourth attack, Diomedes is halted by Apollo's warnings, and he remembers the instructions of Athena, which allowed him to attack Aphrodite, but no other Olympian. Later in the same melee, Diomedes fights with Hector and encounters Ares, the war-god, fighting on the Trojans' side. Thinking still of Athena's instructions, Diomedes calls for his soldiers to fall back slowly. However, Athena encourages Diomedes to re-enter the battle field, and after she mounts a chariot by his side, he attacks and drives a spear into Ares' body. Bellowing in pain, the wounded god ascends to Olympus in a column of smoke, forcing the Trojans to fall back. King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... In Homers Iliad, Pandarus or Pandaros is the son of Lycaon and a famous archer. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a beardless youth), was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... Hector brought back to Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Ares (Greek: ) is the son of Zeus (ruler of the gods) and Hera. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ...


In the Iliad, Diomedes and Odysseus steal King Rhesus's team of fine horses during a night raid on the Trojan camp. This demonstrates the two kings' courage and guile, but more importantly fulfills one of the prophecies required for the fall of Troy: that Troy will not fall while the horses of Rhesus feed upon its plains. Another version of the myth suggested Troy would never fall unless the Palladium was stolen (also achieved by the former pair). Head of Odysseus from a Greek 2nd century BC marble group representing Odysseus blinding Polyphemus, found at the villa of Tiberius at Sperlonga Odysseus or Ulysses (Greek Odysseys; Latin: Ulixes or, less commonly, Ulysses), pronounced , is the main hero in Homers epic poem, the Odyssey, and plays a key... Rhesus (Rhêsos) was a Thracian king who fought on the side of Trojans in the Iliad. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Palladion. ...



There is also an account on a mission in which Diomedes and Odysseus set out to retrieve the cursed and abandoned Philoctetes, whose Heraclean bow was necessarry for the conquest of Ilium. In another version, Odysseus is sent on that mission with Achilles' blood-thirsty son, Neoptolemus. In Greek mythology, Philoctetes (also Philoktêtês or Philocthetes, Φιλοκτήτης) was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) For other uses, see Heracles (disambiguation). ... The term Illion, Ilium has several meanings, including in legends, in anatomy, and in the arts: Ilion or Ilium is an alternative name for the legendary city of Troy. ... Neoptolemus killing Priam In Greek mythology, Neoptolemus, also Neoptólemos or Pyrrhus, was the son of the warrior Achilles and the princess Deidamea. ...


Aftermath

Diomedes is one of the Achaean heroes who earns a safe return by the Gods, or almost. Despite Diomedes' noble treatment of her son Aeneas, Aphrodite never managed to forget about the Argive spear that had once pierced her flesh in the fields of Troy. As soon as Diomedes arrives to his Kingdom of Argos he's taken by surprise, as his wife Aegiale had been persuaded by Aphrodite to marry another man and put him to the throne. Diomedes finds that he has no wish to punish a woman nor any further reason to remain on Achaean land. Thus he sets off with his armies to Italy, where he founds the cities of Brundisium and Arpus Hippium. In Virgil's Aeneid, Diomedes has a second encounter with his old enemy Aeneas, whose life he would have taken during the Trojan War if not for the intervention of first Aphrodite and second Apollo. The natives of Latium visit the palace of Diomedes (then already a King) in an attempt to persuade him to lead their armies against the forces of Aeneas. Diomedes turns down the offer, claiming that he has already killed too many Trojans in his life, and that his purpose in Italy is to live in peace. In Greek mythology, Aegiale was the wife of Diomedes. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... Brindisi is an ancient city in the Italian region of Puglia, the capital of the province of Brindisi. ... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a beardless youth), was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ...


Death

Neither Homer nor Virgil gives the reader any foreshadowing of Diomedes's death except for a passage in the Iliad in which Dione, Aphrodite's mother, comforts the goddess of love (after she has been injured by Diomedes), telling her daughter that "the man who fights the gods does not live long." In the post-Homeric myths, Athena granted Diomedes the immortality that was once meant for his father Tydeus. Thus Diomedes became a god who was worshiped under various names in Italy. This article is about living for infinite period of time. ...


In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Diomedes in the Eighth Circle of Hell, where he is condemned together with Odysseus to be imprisoned for eternity in a sheet of flame. The specific sin which Dante has in mind as to Diomedes appears to be the theft of the Palladium. The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia, later christened Divina by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature ever. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... Head of Odysseus from a Greek 2nd century BC marble group representing Odysseus blinding Polyphemus, found at the villa of Tiberius at Sperlonga Odysseus or Ulysses (Greek Odysseys; Latin: Ulixes or, less commonly, Ulysses), pronounced , is the main hero in Homers epic poem, the Odyssey, and plays a key...


The Troilus and Cressida legend

Diomedes plays an important role in the medieval legend of Troilus and Cressida, in which he becomes the girl's new lover when she is sent to the Greek camp to join her traitorous father. In Shakespeare's play of that title, Diomedes is often seen fighting Troilus over her. The History of Troilus and Cressida is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written around 1602, shortly after the completion of Hamlet. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Diomedes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Diomedes: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (2075 words)
In Homer's Iliad Diomedes is regarded alongside Ajax as the second-best warriors of all the Achaeans.
Diomedes is also known for being one of the suitors of Helen, and therefore bound by the Oath of Tyndareus to defend and protect the one who would become her husband.
Diomedes plays an important role in the medieval legend of Troilus and Cressida, in which he becomes the girl's new lover when she is sent to the Greek camp to join her traitorous father.
Heroes in the Trojan War (8993 words)
Autolycus, Sisyphus, Penelope, Telemachus, Achilles, Diomedes, Telamonian Ajax, Lesser Ajax, Agamemnon, Athena, Poseidon, Circe, Teiresias.
Diomedes was the son of Tydeus, one of the seven leaders against Thebes, and Deïpyle (Deipyle), daughter of Adrastus, king of Argos.
In fact, Diomedes was given immortality by Athena, which she had not given to his father Tydeus during the war of the Seven Against Thebes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m