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Encyclopedia > Diomedea
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Great albatross

Southern Royal Albatross
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Procellariiformes
Family: Diomedeidae
Genus: Diomedea
Linnaeus, 1758
Species

D. exulans (Linnaeus, 1758)
D. antipodensis (Robertson & Warham, 1992)
D. amsterdamensis (Roux et al, 1983)
D. dabbenea (Mathews, 1929)
D. sanfordi (Murphy, 1917)
D. epomophora (Lesson, 1785) Image File history File links Souther Royal Albatross (Diomedea epomorpha) Author: Thomas Mattern Institution: Department of Zoology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Image date: 23. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Jump to: navigation, search Phyla Porifera (sponges) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria Placozoa Subregnum Bilateria  Acoelomorpha  Orthonectida  Rhombozoa  Myxozoa  Superphylum Deuterostomia     Chordata (vertebrates, etc. ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascideiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Jump to: navigation, search Orders Many - see section below. ... Families Procellariidae Diomedeidae Hydrobatidae Pelecanoididae Procellariiformes (from the Latin procella, a storm) is an order of birds formerly called Tubinares and still called tubenoses in English. ... Genera Diomedea Thallasarche Phoebastria Phoebetria The albatrosses (from Portuguese Alcatraz, a pelican) are seabirds in the family Diomedeidae, which is closely allied to the petrels. ... Carolus Linnaeus ~Carl Linnaeus~, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné (   listen?), and in English usually under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of taxonomy. ... Jump to: navigation, search In biology, the most commonly used definition of species was first coined by Ernst Mayr. ... Carolus Linnaeus ~Carl Linnaeus~, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné (   listen?), and in English usually under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of taxonomy. ... 1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1992 was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1917 was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... René Primevère Lesson (March 20, 1794 - April 28, 1849) was a French surgeon and naturalist. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

The great albatrosses are seabirds in the genus Diomedea in the albatross family. The genus Diomedea formerly included all albatrosses except the sooty albatrosses, but in 1996 the genus was split with the mollymawks and the North Pacific albatrosses both being elevated to separate genera. the great albatrosses themselves form two species complexes, the wandering and Amsterdam albatrosses and the royal albatrosses. The spliting of the great albatrosses into six species has not been accepted by all authorities. Seabirds are birds that spend much of their lives, outside the breeding season at least, at sea. ... In biology, a genus (plural genera) is a grouping in the classification of living organisms having one or more related and morphologically similar species. ... Jump to: navigation, search Genera Diomedea Thalassarche Phoebastria Phoebetria Albatrosses are seabirds in the family Diomedeidae, which is closely allied to the procellarids, storm-petrels and diving-petrels in the order Procellariiformes (the tubenoses). ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Species (Hilsenberg, 1822) (Forster, 1785) The sooty albatrosses or sooties are small albatrosses from the genus Phoebetria. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Jump to: navigation, search Species (Gmelin, 1789) (Rothschild, 1903) (Rothschild, 1893) (Gould, 1841) (Murphy, 1930) (Rothschild, 1893) (Mathews, 1893) (Forster, 1785) (Temminck, 1828) The mollymawks are a group of medium sized albatrosses that form the genus Thalassarche. ... Jump to: navigation, search In biology, the most commonly used definition of species was first coined by Ernst Mayr. ...


Great albatrosses are the largest of the albatrosses and are amongst the largest of flying birds. They have the largest wingspans of any birds; one recorded wingspan was 345 cm from tip to tip, although the avarage is around 3m. The great albatrosses are predominatly white in plumage as adults, with birds becoming whiter as they age. The exception is the recently discovered Amsterdam Albatross, which retains the dark brown plumage of juvenile birds into adulthood. Flight is the mode of locomotion used by most of the world’s bird species. ... Jump to: navigation, search Orders Many - see section below. ... Closeup on a single white feather A feather is one of the epidermal growths that forms the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on a bird. ... Binomial name Diomedea amsterdamensis Roux et al. ...


Like most albatrosses the great albatrosses raneg across the Southern Ocean, and nest (for the most part) on isolated oceanic islands. The wandering albatrosses nest on islands around the Southern Ocean, from the Atlantic Ocean (South Georgia and Tristan da Cuhna), to the Indian Ocean and New Zealand's sub-Antarctic islands. The royal albatrosses nest only on new Zealand's sub-Antarctic islands, with one unusual colony on New Zealand's Otago Peninsula South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands is an overseas territory of the United Kingdom, also claimed by Argentina. ... Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ... NASA satellite photo of Otago Peninsula and Otago Harbour. ...

Jump to: navigation, search Great albatrosses (Diomedea) Southern Royal Albatross Northern Royal Albatross Wandering Albatross Antipodean Albatross Tristan Albatross Amsterdam Albatross ... Binomial name Diomedea exulans Linnaeus, 1758 The best known Albatross is the Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans), which occurs in all parts of the Southern Oceans. ... Binomial name Diomedea amsterdamensis Roux et al. ...

References

  • Brooke, M. (2004). Albatrosses And Petrels Across The World: Procellariidae. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK ISBN 0-19-850125-0
  • Tickell, W.L.N. (2000). Albatrosses Sussex:Pica press, ISBN 1-873403-94-1

  Results from FactBites:
 
Annotated List of the Seabirds of the World - Albatrosses (582 words)
Diomedea antipodensis Antipodean Albatross (new candidate for consideration)
Diomedea impavida Campbell Albatross (new candidate for consideration)
Diomedea eremita Chatham Albatross (new candidate for consideration)
Black-footed Albatross (469 words)
Diomedea nigripes has the bill much thicker, or less compressed than the other two species; its ridge very broad and convex at the base, its basal outline being semicircular and two inches in extent, so that its sides behind overlap and obliterate the sutural space behind the nostrils.
Diomedea chlororhyncos has the bill much compressed, its ridge convex in its whole length, but with its basal outline, although semicircular, only half an inch in extent, so that between its margins and those of the sides of the bill there is behind the eye a space nearly a quarter of an inch in breadth.
Diomedea fusca has the bill as much compressed as that of D. chlororhyncos; but its ridge, in place of being convex, is carinate, and instead of having its base semicircular, as in the other two species, has it running up on the forehead into a very acute angle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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