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Encyclopedia > Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness
Moray, Ross and Caithness 
Arms of Moray, Ross and Caithness
Province Scotland
Diocesan bishop Bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness
Cathedral St. Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness
Subdivisions
Parishes
Membership — 
Diocesan website

The Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness is one of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church. It covers Caithness and Sutherland (the old Diocese of Caithness), mainland Ross and Cromarty (the old Diocese of Ross), and mainland Inverness-shire, Nairnshire, Moray and Banffshire (the old Diocese of Moray). The diocesan centre is St. Andrew's Cathedral in Inverness. An ecclesiastical province is a unit of religious government existing in certain Christian churches. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... A bishop in charge of a diocese. ... The Cathedral of St Andrew in Inverness, Scotland, is the mother church of the Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness within the Scottish Episcopal Church. ... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Anglican, Catholic and some Lutheran churches, which serves as the central church of a diocese, and thus as a bishops seat. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Caithness (Gallaibh in Gaelic)[1] is a committee area of Highland Council, Scotland; a lieutenancy area; and a registration county, Caithness was formerly a district within the Highland region from 1975 to 1996 and a local government county with its own county council from 1890 to 1975. ... Sutherland (Cataibh in Gaelic) is a committee area of the Highland Council, Scotland, a registration county, and a lieutenancy area. ... Ross and Cromarty: administrative county (1889-1975) Image:RossCromDistrict. ... Inverness-shire (Siorrachd Inbhir Nis in Gaelic) is one of the traditional counties of Scotland. ... Nairnshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Narann in Gaelic) is a small traditional county of Scotland, centred around Nairn, the traditional county town. ... Moray, or the anglified Morayshire or Elginshire (Mhoireibh in Gaelic) was a county of Scotland, bordering the former Nairnshire to the west, Inverness-shire to the south, and Banffshire to the east. ... Banffshire (Siorrachd Bhanbh in Gaelic) is a small traditional county in the north of Scotland. ... Inverness (Inbhir Nis in Scottish Gaelic) is the only city in the Highland council area and the Highlands of Scotland. ...


The three old dioceses united in the modern diocese were all founded during the 12th century. Moray was founded by Bishop Gregory in 1114, Ross by Bishop Macbeth in 1131 and Caithness by Bishop Andrew in 1146. Being more removed from the centre of political power during the Scottish Reformation, each of the dioceses managed to continue an unbroken line of bishops. However, its remoteness also caused problems for the appointment of new bishops under the period of the penal laws. For part of the 17th century, both Ross and Caithness were without a bishop, and, at the beginning of the 18th century, the Diocese of Orkney was united with Caithness. In 1707, Alexander Rose, Bishop of Edinburgh and the first Primus, united Moray with his diocese for reason of practical oversight. John Fullarton, Rose's successor in both roles, continued to oversee Moray until 1725, when it was felt more practical to combine it with the Diocese of Aberdeen, led by James Gadderar. However, in 1727, the new Primus, Andrew Lumsden, appointed William Dunbar as sole Bishop of Moray and Ross, combining the vacant northern see with Moray. In 1777, William Falconar, also Primus, united Orkney, Moray, Ross and Caithness under his rule. In 1819, David Low was appointed Bishop of Ross by itself, but, from 1838 he administered the entire former union and the see officially returned to the union in 1851. In 1857, Orkney was separated to unite with the Diocese of Aberdeen. The current Bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness is the Right Reverend John Crook. The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Two bishops assist at the Exhumation of Saint Hubert, who was a bishop too, at the église Saint-Pierre in Liège. ... The Bishop of Edinburgh is the Ordinary of the Scottish Episcopal Diocese of Edinburgh. ... The Primus, styled The Most Revd the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, is the presiding bishop of the Scottish Episcopal Church. ... The Diocese of Aberdeen (Scotland). ... The Diocese of Aberdeen (Scotland). ... The Cathedral of St Andrew in Inverness, Scotland, is the mother church of the Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness within the Scottish Episcopal Church. ... The Right Reverend (Rt. ...

Dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church

Aberdeen and Orkney | St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane | Argyll and the Isles | Brechin | Edinburgh | Glasgow and Galloway | Moray, Ross and Caithness Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ...


See also: Scottish Episcopal Church | Primus The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Primus, styled The Most Revd the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, is the presiding bishop of the Scottish Episcopal Church. ...


 
 

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