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Encyclopedia > Dingo
Dingo

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Canidae
Genus: Canis
Species: C. lupus
Subspecies: C. l. dingo
Trinomial name
Canis lupus dingo
(Meyer, 1793)
Dingo range
Dingo range
Breed classification
ANKC: Group 4 (Hounds)
ARBA: Spitz and Primitive Group
Breed standards (external link)
ANKC

The dingo (plural dingoes) or warrigal, Canis lupus dingo, is a type of wild dog, probably descended from the Southern-East Asian Wolf (Canis Lupus Pallipes). [2] It is commonly described as an Australian wild dog, but is not restricted to Australia, nor did it originate there. Modern dingoes are found throughout Southeast Asia, mostly in small pockets of remaining natural forest, and in mainland Australia, particularly in the north. They have features in common with both wolves and modern dogs, and are regarded as more or less unchanged descendants of an early ancestor of modern dogs. The name dingo comes from the language of the Eora Aboriginal people, who were the original inhabitants of the Sydney area. As well as being the name for a type of wild dog found in Australia (see Dingo), Dingo is used to refer to: Daimler Dingo, a British armoured scout car ATF Dingo, a German armoured car The Dingoes, an Australian rock act Dingo (band), a Finnish rock act Dingo (film... Image File history File links Dingo3. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn3. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Genera Alopex Atelocynus Canis Cerdocyon Chrysocyon Cuon Cynotherium † Dusicyon † Dasycyon † Fennecus (Part of Vulpes) Lycalopex (Part of Pseudalopex) Lycaon Nyctereutes Otocyon Pseudalopex Speothos Urocyon Vulpes The Canidae (′kanə′dÄ“, IPA: ) family is a part of the order Carnivora within the mammals (Class Mammalia). ... Species Canis adustus Canis aureus Canis dirus (extinct) Canis latrans Canis lupus Canis mesomelas Canis simensis   † also includes dogs. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Trinomial nomenclature is a taxonomic naming system that extends the standard system of binomial nomenclature by adding a third taxon. ... Friedrich Albrecht Anton Meyer (1768-1795) was a German doctor and naturalist. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4500x2234, 103 KB) The pinky colour indicate areas of crossbreeding uncertainty. ... The Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) is the peak body in Australia responsible for promoting excellence in breeding, showing, trialling, obedience, and other canine-related activities and the ownership of temperamentally and physically sound purebred dogs by responsible individuals across Australia. ... The American Rare Breed Association or ARBA is a national kennel club of the United States. ... Wild Dog may refer to one of the following: African Wild Dog — an African mammal Wild Dog (comics) — a DC Comics character Wild Dog (Time Crisis) — a villain in the Time Crisis series of videogames Category: ... The Southern-East Asian Wolf (Canis lupus pallipes), also known as the Turkish or Iranian wolf, is a subspecies of Grey Wolf which ranges from Northern Israel, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Afghanistan and Iran. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Portrait of Bennelong, senior man of the Eora / Dharawal tribe The traditional owners of the inner Sydney City region of Australia are the Cadigal people. ... For a more complete list of Aboriginal tribes and other collective designations, see List of Indigenous Australian group names There are several hundred Indigenous Australian communities in Australia, which are often (but not particularly accurately) referred to as tribes. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...

Contents

Characteristics

The dingo is legendary as Australia's wild dog, though it also occurs in Southeast Asia. The Australian animals may be descendants of Asian dingoes that were introduced to the continent some 2,000 to 3,000 years ago.


These golden-orange canids may live alone (especially young males) or in packs of up to 15 animals. They roam great distances and communicate with wolf-like howls.


Dingo hunting is opportunistic. Animals hunt alone or in packs. They pursue small game such as rabbits, rodents, birds, and lizards in addition to larger prey such as kangaroos, sheep and deer. These dogs will eat fruits and plants as well. They also scavenge from humans, particularly in their Asian range.


Dingoes breed only once a year. Females typically give birth to about five pups, which are not independent until six to eight months of age. In packs, a dominant breeding female will kill the offspring of other females.


Australia is home to so many of these animals that they are generally considered cute, but pests. A famous "dingo fence" has been erected to protect grazing lands for the continent's herds of sheep. It is likely that more dingoes live in Australia today than when Europeans first arrived. Location of the Dingo Fence (purple) Dingo Fence at Igy Corner, SW of Coober Pedy The Dingo Fence or Dog Fence is a barrier that was built in Australia during the 1880s and finished in 1885, to keep dingos out of the relatively fertile south-east part of the continent...


Though dingoes are numerous, their pure genetic strain is gradually being compromised. They can and do interbreed with domestic dogs to produce hybrid animals. Studies suggest that more than a third of southeastern Australia's dingoes are hybrids.


At between 10 and 24 kilograms (22-53 pounds), dingoes are a little smaller than wolves of the northern hemisphere (in keeping with Bergmann's Rule) and have a lean, athletic build. They stand between 44 and 63 cm (17-25inches) high at the shoulder, and the head-body length varies between 86 and 122 cm (34-48inches). Fur colour varies but is usually ginger: some have a reddish tinge, others are more sandy yellow, and some are even black; the underside is lighter. Alpine dingoes are found in high elevation areas of the Australian Alps, and grow a second thicker coat during late autumn for warmth which usually sheds by mid to late spring. Most dingoes have white markings on the chest, feet, and the tip of the tail; some have a blackish muzzle. They can live for up to 14 years in captivity, but have a more usual lifespan of 3-7 years.[3][4] The large size of a polar bear allows it to radiate less heat in a cold climate. ... Looking across everlastings on Mt Hotham to Mt Feathertop; during winter these mountains are blanketed in snow The Australian Alps The Australian Alps are the highest mountain ranges of mainland Australia. ...


Unlike the domestic dog, dingoes breed only once a year,[3] generally do not bark,[5] and have erect ears. They have a more independent temperament than domestic dogs, and the skull is distinctive, with a narrower muzzle, larger auditory bullae, larger canine teeth, and a domed head. They are extremely agile and are known to climb trees.


Wild dingoes prey on a variety of animals, mostly small or medium-sized animals, but also larger herbivores if need be. They are opportunistic carnivores, taking prey ranging in size from lizards and small rodents up to sheep and kangaroos. Carnivorism redirects here. ... Species Macropus rufus Macropus giganteus Macropus fuliginosus Macropus antilopinus A kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae (macropods, meaning large foot). In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, the Red Kangaroo, the Antilopine Kangaroo, and the Eastern and Western Grey Kangaroo...


Dingoes do not generally form packs; they more often travel in pairs or small family groups. However, they are capable of forming larger packs to hunt cooperatively. While dingo groups use defined home territories, these territories can overlap with those of other groups.


Domestication is possible only if the dingoes are taken into captivity as young pups.


Origin

Dingo resting at the Australia Zoo
Dingo resting at the Australia Zoo

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x790, 391 KB) Dingo, Australia Zoo, QLD DE:Beschreibung Dingo, Australia Zoo, Queensland, Australien Fotograf: Jörn Brauns Datum: 23. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x790, 391 KB) Dingo, Australia Zoo, QLD DE:Beschreibung Dingo, Australia Zoo, Queensland, Australien Fotograf: Jörn Brauns Datum: 23. ... Sign near entrace to the zoo Crocodile show in the Crocoseum at Australia Zoo Aviary at the Australia Zoo Harriet, the second oldest tortoise ever authenticated, lived at Australia Zoo Australia Zoo is located in the Australian state of Queensland on the Sunshine Coast near Beerwah/Glass House Mountains. ...

Earliest evidence

The earliest known dingo skulls have been found in Vietnam and are about 5,500 years old. Dingo remains from 5,000 to 2,500 years old have been found in other parts of South-east Asia, and the earliest fossil record of dingoes in Australia is 3,500 years old. Dingo-like bones have also been found in Israel dating 14,000 years old.[6] Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ...


The ultimate origin of the dingo is uncertain, but it is possibly related to the wolves of south-west Asia, and probably arose in that area at about the same time as humans began to develop agriculture.


Modern dogs are believed to be the result of artificial selection of various traits from a single domestication of the grey wolf about 15,000 years ago[7]: the modern dingo appears to be a relatively pure-bred descendant of one of the earliest domestications. Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ...


14,000 year-old dingo-like bones found in Israel, and 9,000 year-old bones in the Americas are evidence of the commensal relationships that developed between wolves and people—as people migrated eastward, semi-domesticated dogs came with them. The Carolina Dog, often dubbed "American Dingo", shows anatomical and behavioral similarities with the dingo, and potential genetic links are being investigated at the University of South Carolina.[8] World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... The Carolina Dog is a type of wild dog discovered in the late 1970s. ... The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC, SC, or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ...


Introduction to Australia

Dingo at Perth Zoo
Dingo at Perth Zoo

Dingoes did not arrive in Australia as companions of the Aborigines around 60,000 years ago[9] but were probably brought by Austronesian traders much later. A study of dingo mitochondrial DNA published in 2004 places their arrival at around 3000 BC, and suggests that only one small group may be the ancestors of all modern Australian dingoes[10]. Fossil specimens from Wombah midden, dated to 3230 BP (before present), Madura cave on the Nullarbor Plain to 3450 BP and at Fromm's Landing a age of 3170 is given, these are based on C-14 dating [11]. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 1192 KB) Dingo at Perth Zoo, taken in September 2005 using an Olympus c8080w. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 1192 KB) Dingo at Perth Zoo, taken in September 2005 using an Olympus c8080w. ... The Perth Zoo opened in Perth, Australia in 1898 with two lions, a tiger and six staff members. ... Australian Aborigines are the main indigenous people of Australia. ... Mitochondrial DNA (some captions in German) Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the DNA located in organelles called mitochondria. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A midden, also known as kitchen middens, is a dump for domestic waste. ... Before Present (BP) years are the units of time (counted backwards to the past) used to report raw radiocarbon ages and dates referenced to the BP scale origin in the year AD 1950 (identical to 1950 CE). ...


The dingo spread rapidly across Australia, probably with human assistance, and is thought to have occupied the entire continent within a short time. The full extent of the ecological change brought about by the introduction of the dingo remains unknown, but the dingo has been suspected to be the cause of a series of extinctions, notably of marsupial carnivores, including the Australia's mainland population of the Thylacine, though this particular extinction is in doubt.[12] It is thought that the co-operative pack behaviour of dingoes gave them an important competitive advantage over the more solitary marsupial carnivores, particularly during Australia's frequent droughts (when game becomes scarce). Families †Thylacinidae Dasyuridae Myrmecobiidae The order Dasyuromorphia (meaning hairy tail[1]) is made up of most carnivorous marsupials, including quolls, dunnarts, the Numbat, the Tasmanian Devil, and the recently extinct Thylacine. ... Binomial name (Harris, 1808) The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) was the largest known carnivorous marsupial of modern times. ...


Dingoes do not make very good pets as they are difficult to domesticate. Domesticated animals, plants, and other organisms are those whose collective behavior, life cycle, or physiology has been altered as a result of their breeding and living conditions being under human control for multiple generations. ...


Relationship with humans

Shows areas of pure dingoes (light brown) and hybrids (green), and location of the Dingo fence (purple)
Shows areas of pure dingoes (light brown) and hybrids (green), and location of the Dingo fence (purple)

Aboriginal people across the continent adopted the dingo as a companion animal, using it to assist with hunting and for warmth on cold nights. (The terms "two-dog night" and "three-dog night" are believed to come from Aboriginal idiom, describing the overnight temperature.) Image File history File links Download high resolution version (965x867, 46 KB) Summary Map of the w:Dingo fence in Australia (purple), also shows areas of pure dingos and hybrid wild dogs, made by me in Corel Painter IX from information in several maps. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (965x867, 46 KB) Summary Map of the w:Dingo fence in Australia (purple), also shows areas of pure dingos and hybrid wild dogs, made by me in Corel Painter IX from information in several maps. ... Location of the Dingo Fence (purple) Dingo Fence at Igy Corner, SW of Coober Pedy The Dingo Fence or Dog Fence is a barrier that was built in Australia during the 1880s and finished in 1885, to keep dingos out of the relatively fertile south-east part of the continent... Australian Aborigines are the main indigenous people of Australia. ... This article is about animals kept for companionship. ... Three Dog Night is an American rock and roll band, best known for their work from 1968-1975 but still making live appearances as of 2007. ...


When European settlers first arrived in Australia, dingoes were tolerated, even welcomed at times. That changed rapidly when sheep became an important part of the European economy. Dingoes were trapped, shot on sight, and poisoned—often regardless of whether they were truly wild or belonged to Aboriginal people. In the 1880s, construction of the great Dingo Fence began. The Dingo Fence was designed to keep dingoes out of the relatively fertile south-east part of the continent (where they had largely been exterminated) and protect the sheep flocks of southern Queensland. It would eventually stretch 8500 kilometres; from near Toowoomba through thousands of miles of arid country to the Great Australian Bight and would be (at that time) the longest man-made structure in the world. It was only partly successful: dingoes can still be found in parts of the southern states to this day, and although the fence helped reduce losses of sheep to predators, this was counterbalanced by increased pasture competition from rabbits and kangaroos. The history of Australia began when people first migrated to the Australian continent from the north, at least 40,000-45,000 years ago. ... Species See text. ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... Location of the Dingo Fence (purple) Dingo Fence at Igy Corner, SW of Coober Pedy The Dingo Fence or Dog Fence is a barrier that was built in Australia during the 1880s and finished in 1885, to keep dingos out of the relatively fertile south-east part of the continent... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... Toowoomba (also known as the The Garden City) is a city in South East Queensland, Australia. ... The Great Australian Bight is a large bight, or open bay, encompassing an area of the Southern Ocean located off the central and western portions of the southern coastline of mainland Australia. ... In their natural environment and in captivity, rabbits are a benign, even useful species. ... Species Macropus rufus Macropus giganteus Macropus fuliginosus Macropus antilopinus A kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae (macropods, meaning large foot). In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, the Red Kangaroo, the Antilopine Kangaroo, and the Eastern and Western Grey Kangaroo...

At a wildlife rescue center
At a wildlife rescue center

Dingoes have received bad publicity in recent years as a result of the highly publicised Azaria Chamberlain disappearance and also because of dingo attacks on Fraser Island in Queensland. In 2001 around 200 dingoes lived on the island, and 20 people were attacked in the preceding six years.[13] In April 2001 a nine-year-old child was killed in one such attack near Waddy Point on Fraser Island.[13] This led to a cull of the animals which were actually protected by law. The owners of the island, the Ngulungbara people, fought the cull through a legal injunction.[14] In all, 65 dingoes were eventually killed. In 2004 more legal battles began after a dingo entered a bedroom in Kingfisher Bay resort where two young children were present.[15] More recently in September 2006 a dingo was shot dead by Parks and Wildlife rangers after it attacked a four-year-old child who had been playing in shallow water near Eurong on the island.[16] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 497 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1327 × 1600 pixels, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 497 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1327 × 1600 pixels, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Nine-week-old Australian baby Azaria Chamberlain disappeared on the night of 17 August 1980 on a camping trip with her family. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... To cull is to remove from a group of animals those individuals who show signs of weakness. ...


The laws concerning keeping dingoes as pets are inconsistent from one state to another in Australia.[17] It is recommended that if dingoes are to be pets, they be adopted at a young age in order to help them bond with humans. However, dingoes are wild dogs and have strong hunting instincts. They may kill birds and small animals, and get into fights with other similarly sized mammals. When hunting larger animals, dingoes hassle or annoy their prey until the prey is off balance or tired, and the dingoes can attack.[18] They are accustomed to fighting for rank within the pack, and may do the same thing when playing or interacting with other domestic dogs, resulting in dog fights and the appearance of the dingo as the aggressive animal. Like other hunting dogs, dingoes need to be heavily worked in order to be happy and they need space to run.


Relationship with invasive species

In Australia, dingoes compete with the same food supply as introduced feral cats and foxes, and also prey upon them (as well as on feral pigs). A study at James Cook University has concluded that the reintroduction of dingoes would help control the populations of these pests, lessening the pressure on native biodiversity.[19] The author of the study, Professor Chris Johnson, notes his first-hand observations of native rufous bettongs being able to thrive when dingoes are present. The rate of decline of ground-living mammals decreases from 50% or more, to just 10% or less, where dingoes are present to control fox and cat populations. James Cook University (JCU) is a university based in Townsville, Queensland, Australia and was founded in 1970 as the first tertiary education institution in North Queensland (although the first may have been the local TAFE college instead). ... Binomial name Aepyprymnus rufescens (Gray, 1837) The Rufous Rat-kangaroo (Aepyprymnus rufescens), also known as the Rufous Bettong, is a small species of the family Potoroidae found in Australia. ...


Potential extinction

In Captivity
In Captivity

As a result of interbreeding with dogs introduced by European settlers, the purebred dingo gene pool is in decline. By the early 1990s, about a third of all wild dingoes in the south-east of the continent were dingo/domestic dog crosses, and although the process of interbreeding is less advanced in more remote areas, the extinction of the subspecies in the wild is considered inevitable.[20] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixels, file size: 1. ...


Although protection within Federal National Parks, World Heritage areas, Aboriginal reserves, and the Australian Capital Territory is available for dingoes, they are at the same time classified as a pest in other areas. Since a lack of country-wide protection means they may be trapped or poisoned in many areas, in conjunction with the hybridisation with domestic dogs the taxon was upgraded from 'Lower Risk/Least Concern' to 'Vulnerable' by the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources) in 2004.[1] Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ...


See also

Trinomial name Canis lupus pallipes (Reginald Innes Pocock, 1941) Present distribution of Indian wolf in light blue The Indian Wolf (Canis lupus pallipes), also known as the Indian Gray Wolf or the Peninsular Gray Wolf, is the small subspecies of the Grey Wolf. ... The Carolina Dog is a type of wild dog discovered in the late 1970s. ... The Korean Jindo Dog (Hangul: 진돗개; Hanja: 珍島개) is a breed of a hunting dog known to have originated on Jindo Island in Korea. ... The New Guinea Singing Dog (NGSD, New Guinea Highland Dog, or Singer) is a relative of the Australian Dingo that is native to New Guinea. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Corbett (2004). Canis lupus ssp. dingo. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 11 May 2006. Database entry includes justification for why this subspecies is vulnerable
  2. ^ The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution, Cambridge University Press 1992
  3. ^ a b Dingo, Canis lupus familiaris dingo BBC Online Retrieved 6 September 2006.
  4. ^ Dingo Canis dingo theBIGzoo. Retrieved 6 September 2006.
  5. ^ Divisions over dingo cull BBC Online World Service, 22 May, 2001. Retrieved 6 September 2006.
  6. ^ http://www.workingdogweb.com/Dingo.htm
  7. ^ King, Anthony (1 July 2006) "Domestication set dog genes free". New Scientist issue 2558, p.18.
  8. ^ The Carolina Dog Project, University of South Carolina, url accessed on 2006-07-23
  9. ^ ,Flood, Josephine (2004) Archaeology of the Dreamtime, J.B Publishing, Marleston p, 29 ISBN 1 876 62250 4
  10. ^ Savolainen, P. et al. 2004. A detailed picture of the origin of the Australian dingo, obtained from the study of mitochondrial DNA. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 101:12387-12390 PMID
  11. ^ Flood, Josephine (2004) Archaeology of the Dreamtime, J.B Publishing, Marleston p, 228 ISBN 1 876 62250 4
  12. ^ Paddle, Robert (2002). The Last Tasmanian Tiger: The History and Extinction of the Thylacine. Australian Catholic University, North Sydney. ISBN. 
  13. ^ a b Dingoes kill boy at tourist spot BBC News Online, 30 April, 2001. Retrieved 6 September 2006.
  14. ^ Aborigines fight dingo cull BBC News Online, 3 May, 2001. Retrieved 6 September 2006.
  15. ^ Traditional owners move to block dingo cull The Sydney Morning Herald, 12 November 2004. Retrieved 6 September 2006.
  16. ^ Fraser Is dingo killed following attack on girl 5 September 2006. Retrieved 6 September 2006.
  17. ^ Australian Dingo, Aussie-info.com
  18. ^ Dingo, Animal Planet
  19. ^ ECOS magazine 133 Oct-Nov 2006. Call for more dingoes to restore native species. Tracey Millen. [1] (Refers to the book Australia's Mammal Extinctions: a 50,000 year history. Christopher N. Johnson. ISBN-978-0521686600).
  20. ^ http://www.drellenrudolph.com/featureanimals/dingo.html

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Dingo Information and Pictures, Australian Native Dogs (974 words)
The dingo has some unusual traits - a great tree climber and at times a bit aloof, but these are interesting traits and are in the same category as the dingoes nearest cousin the New Guinea Singing Dog and the Finnish Spitz, but displaying the same characteristics.
With the European's introduction of domestic sheep and rabbit, the Dingo population flourished.
The Federal Government classifies the Dingo as wildlife and it may not be exported except from and to registered and approved wildlife parks and zoos.
Dingo - MSN Encarta (246 words)
The dingo probably competed with and took over the ecological niche of the smaller thylacine, a carnivorous marsupial, and may have contributed to its disappearance from Australia.
Dingoes are carnivores, but they eat almost anything: insects, rodents, carrion, and vegetable matter.
Dingoes are sometimes captured young by Aboriginal Australians and kept as hunting companions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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