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Encyclopedia > Dinghy
Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress
Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress

A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. Dinghies are usually rowboats or have a small outboard motor while others may use a small sailing rig. They are necessary for any off-ship excursions from larger boats, outside of docking at suitably-sized ports or marinas. When not in the above context, a "dinghy" commonly refers to any similar boat originally developed for that use, but now used in its own right for dinghy sailing or rowing. Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress. ... Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... A boat is a craft or vessel designed to float on, and provide transport over, water. ... The GB coxless pair of Toby Garbett & Rick Dunn at Henley Royal Regatta 2004. ... Bolinders two cylinder Trim outboard engine. ... A dock is an area of water between two piers or alongside a pier, forming a chamber used for building or repairing one ship. ... Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ... A small marina at Brixham, Devon, England. ... 2 GP14s, a Topper and a Graduate Dinghy sailing is the activity of sailing small boats by using (1) the sails and (2) underwater foils (centreboard and rudder). ... Rowing in the Amstel River by a student rowing club. ...


A small vehicle towed behind a motorhome is colloquially referred to as a dinghy. Recreational Vehicle (RV) is a broad term used to describe a large enclosed piece of equipment with wheels designed to be moved from place to place for people to temporarily live in and be protected from the elements while away from their permanent domicile. ...

Contents

Types

Dinghies range in length from 2 to 6 meters. Larger auxiliary vessels are generally called tenders, pinnaces or lifeboats. The best size of dinghy for most yachts is about 3.5 to 4 meters, because this can carry a complete family or a family's provisions for a month; however, yacht size usually is the limiting factor. Folding and take-down multi-piece dinghies are also implemented where space is limited. Some newer dinghies have much greater buoyancy and have great carrying capacity relative to length of the boat (see self-rescue dinghies, bottom of this section). Tender may mean: In finance: A process by which one can seek prices and terms for a particular project (such as a construction job) to be carried out under a contract. ... A pinnace is a light boat, propelled by sails or oars, formerly used as a tender for guiding merchant and war vessels. ... A lifeboat is a rigid (or inflatable) boat designed to rescue people in trouble at sea. ... A modern yacht A yacht (From Dutch Jacht meaning hunt) was originally defined as a light, fast sailing vessel used to convey important persons. ...


Modern dinghies are typically made of glass-fiber reinforced polyester (GRP) because it requires the least care and does not rot. Water penetrating the outer coat can cause blistering and damage to lamination but can be prevented with a barrier coat of epoxy resin. Other materials include Aluminum, marine plywood and, with the advent of sturdy, UV resistant urethane varnishes, wood. These wooden dinghies, which are built using the carvel or clinker methods, are considered to be more aesthetically pleasing and easier to handle than the prefabricated craft, despite being heavier. Favored woods, in order of rot resistance, are locust, mahogany, fir and spruce. Bronze is the best material for hardware, followed by stainless steel. Working boats usually use galvanized steel, replacing the hardware every few years. The composite Rutan VariEze, a home-build light aircraft Glass-reinforced plastic (GRP), is a composite material or fiber-reinforced plastic made of a plastic reinforced by fine fibers made of glass. ... Epoxy or polyepoxide is a thermosetting epoxide polymer that cures (polymerizes and crosslinks) when mixed with a catalyzing agent or hardener. Most common epoxy resins are produced from a reaction between epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A. The first commercial attempts to prepare resins from epichlorohydrin occurred in 1927 in the United... Aluminum is a soft and lightweight metal with a dull silvery appearance, due to a thin layer of oxidation that forms quickly when it is exposed to air. ... Toy constructed from plywood. ... Ultraviolet (UV) light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light, but longer than soft X-rays. ... In boat building, carvel is a method of constructing wooden boats by fixing planks to a frame so that the planks butt up against each other, gaining support from the frame and forming a smooth hull. ... Clinker is a boat building technique used for constructing hulls of boats and ships by fixing wooden planks and in the early nineteenth century, iron plates to each other so that the planks overlap along their edges. ... Binomial name Robinia pseudoacacia L. Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a tree in the subfamily Faboideae of the pea family Fabaceae. ... The name mahogany was first used for wood of Swietenia mahagoni, later also for the wood of the closely related Swietenia macrophylla. ... FIR may stand for: finite impulse response (a property of some digital filters) far infrared, i. ... Species About 35; see text. ... Assorted ancient bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... The 630 foot high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ... Galvanization, named after the Italian scientist Luigi Galvani, was originally the administration of electric shocks (in the 19th century also termed Faradism, after Michael Faraday). ... The old Steel cable of a colliery winding tower Steel is sometimes described as a sea of electrons. ...

  • Whaleboats are the classic premium rowboats, with a sharp bow, fine stern lines and a canoe transom. Despite a slight tip and less cargo capacity than prams, they row, motor and sail the best because of their fine lines. Prior to the introduction of fiberglass as a construction material, dories were more popular because their ease of assembly and, thereby, lower cost.
  • Whitehall Rowboats were the water taxis of the late 1800's until the invention of the small gasoline outboard. Considered one of the most refined rowboats for harbor and lake use, Whitehall Rowboats are a descendant of the Captain's Gig which was used for a similar purpose on a navel vessel.
  • Dories are sharp-ended boats made of wood, fiberglass or aluminum. They cut the water well, but their initial stability is low, making them feel tipsy in flat water. Consequently, a loaded dory becomes more stable as more of the beam of the boat is submerged. Dories are not generally used as service boats to yachts. A dory can be landed or launched through surf where a Whitehall may flounder.
  • Prams are similar to dories but are wider with transoms at both bow and stern. They are difficult to tip and carry a lot of cargo but are slow because of their lack of directional stability. Good photos of small prams can be seen at: [1] and [2]. The Norwegian article. A boat-builder's product description.
  • Some inflatable boats, such as the Zodiac-type inflatable, have a rigid deck and transom which allows an engine to be used for propulsion. They row poorly because of their blunt bows and large wetted surface, but the fact that they are inflated makes them exceptionally buoyant.
  • Recently, rigid multifunction self-rescue dinghies such as the rotation-molded Portland Pudgy multifunction dinghy[3] and the Clam [4], have been introduced, challenging the idea that sitting in an inflatable liferaft and waiting for rescue is the best solution to the problem of abandoning ship. These boats are meant to serve as everyday tenders and as pro-active self-rescue dinghies. The Portland Pudgy is also becoming popular as a recreational sailing dinghy and motorboat. Because they are designed for self-rescue they are exceptionally buoyant and have great carrying capacity relative to length.

A modern copy of a traditional whaleboat on display at Mystic Seaport. ... Transom (probably a corruption of Latin transtrum, a thwart, in a boat; equivalents are French traverse, croisillon, German Losholz) is the architectural term given to the horizontal lintel or beam which is framed across a window, dividing it into stages or heights. ... Whitehall Rowboats are considered one of the most refined rowboats of the 1800s. ... A Captains Gig is a boat used on naval ships as the Captains taxi. ... A dory is a small, shallow-draft boat of approximately 5 to 7 m (15 to 22 feet) in length. ... Transom (probably a corruption of Latin transtrum, a thwart, in a boat; equivalents are French traverse, croisillon, German Losholz) is the architectural term given to the horizontal lintel or beam which is framed across a window, dividing it into stages or heights. ... Bow may mean: Bow (knot): A type of knot Bow (music): A device used to play string instruments Bow (ship): The foremost point of the hull of a ship or boat Bow (weapon): An archery weapon that uses elasticity to propel arrows Bow (human): Bowing is the act of lowering... Aft of the Soleil Royal, by Jean Bérain the Elder. ... Two inflatable boats at Horsea Island, England An inflatable boat is a light-weight but high performance and high capacity boat constructed with flexible tubes at the gunwale. ...

Space Issues

Inflatable dinghy
Inflatable dinghy

On yachts shorter than 10 meters, there is not enough room for a reasonably sized dinghy and yet there is a genuine need for one. Because anchorage is much less expensive than a dock or slip space, owners of small yachts compromise by carrying a small rigid dinghy or deflated inflatable, or by towing a larger dinghy. Dinghies are sometimes used as lifeboats, but, unless carefully planned, such a use may be unsafe since the boat must be reserved for people. Any extra equipment can be stored in containers or bags that are tied to the dinghy. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 2347 KB) Frank van Mierlo 05:18, 18 June 2006 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 2347 KB) Frank van Mierlo 05:18, 18 June 2006 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


Rigid dinghies for small yachts are very small (2 meters) dinghies, usually with a pram (blunt) bow to get more beam (width) in a shorter length. Larger dinghies are towed and should have reserve buoyancy, an automatic bailer, and a cover to prevent them from being lost at sea. Most masters prefer a tow cable long enough to put the dinghy on the back side of the swell to prevent the dinghy from ramming the transom of the yacht.


Inflatables are inconvenient to tow and take extra time to inflate but are very compact and fit easily into place while at sea. Alternately, owners have experimented with a two-piece rigid dinghy that is towed while in harbor and disassembled into two nesting pieces while off-shore. As long as the joining method is sturdy, these have produced good results.


An alternative to the traditional inflatable dinghy is to add inflatable tubes to a hard dinghy.


Essential hardware

A dinghy should have a strong ring on the bow, bolted through the keel in such a way that it will not damage the yacht's deck when the dinghy is inverted on deck. The ring is used for securing the painter (the line that anchors the boat to a dock), towing, and anchoring. Additionally, the dinghy should also have two other rings (one on each side of the stern transom) which, with the bow ring, are used for lifting and securing the dinghy for stowage.


The only other essential pieces of hardware are the oarlocks which are used as a fulcrum to allow for effective rowing of the dinghy. The boat can struggle along with a single set of sculling oarlocks (oarlocks that allow a single person to manipulate two oars) on the gunwale but conventionally will have a sweep-oar arrangement in which each passenger in the boat is responsible for one oar. The oarlocks should either have ropes and storage pockets or permanent mounts.


The dinghy is generally inverted amidships on yachts to avoid unbalancing the boat, to keep the dinghy secure from waves, and to keep water out. When the dinghy is inverted amidships, many yacht owners prefer for it to have handholds built into the bottom. These make launching easier and provide more handholds on deck.


Most yachts launch their dinghies by hand or with a simple lifting tackle rigged from the main mast. Another arrangement, davits over the transom, is convenient and elegant, but sailing in a heavy following sea could cause the loss of a dinghy. If a dinghy is towed, an extra line with a loop in the end (known as a lazy painter) can be attached to a thwart, cleat, or mast step so that if the towing line breaks, there is a line to grab with a boat hook. This extra line makes retrieval easier at sea, especially if the boat is partially swamped.


A name and identifying numbers are stenciled somewhere on the craft to prevent theft. Typically it is found on the bow or, for inflatables, the inside of the transom. Most often, the name is different from that of the main yacht. Otherwise, a potential thief will be able to see when the occupants of a particular yacht are ashore, making the yacht a prime target for robbery.


Propulsion

Conventional dinghies are powered by rowing with one set of oarlocks for each thwart (seat). In some models, sliding thwarts allow far more powerful rowing while in others, a removable thwart can permit standing rowing. A single sculling oar with an oarlock on the rear transom can be a compact emergency oar- it's moved in a figure-eight motion. OAR is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: An abbreviation of the term Original Aspect Ratio. ...


Another popular option is an outboard motor. A horsepower per meter of length is faster than oars. Two horsepower per meter can reach hull speed. Ten horsepower per meter will put a flat-bottomed dinghy on plane. Conventionally, the gas tank is placed under the rear thwart. Engines always swing up so the dinghy can be grounded without damage. Since the transom usually needs to be cut down for the engine to fit properly, an engine well should be used to prevent low waves from splashing over the transom and flooding the boat.


The typical sailing rig for a dinghy is a gunter with a two-piece folding mast stepped through a thwart and resting on the keel. It is raised by pulling a rope. A single-sailed gaff rig is preferred over a marconi (with a triangular mainsail and jib) because a gaff rig is simpler and has a lower center of force. The bottom of the main sail is usually untended (no boom) in order to avoid hitting the passengers with a spar. Recently, power kites have become available. They are more compact, help maneuver and are easier to install, but require more attention. In sailing, a gunter is a wire that leads from one end of a gaff to the other. ... A power kite or traction kite is a large kite designed to provide significant pull. ...


Traditional working dinghies have a lee board that can be hooked over the side. This does not split the cargo space. A sailing rudder is usually tied to a simple pair of pintles (hinge pins) on the transom with the bottom pintle being longer so that the rudder can be mounted one pintle at a time. The rope keeps the rudder from floating off in a wave. Both rudders and lee boards have swiveling tips so the dinghy can be landed. Rudders are often arranged so the tiller folds against the rudder to make a compact package.


Racing dinghies usually have a daggerboard or centerboard to better sail upwind. The trunk is in the middle of what would otherwise be cargo area.


Other equipment

Additional equipment that is generally considered necessary on a dinghy includes the following:

  • life-jackets for every potential occupant
  • a hand-bailer
  • a bailing sponge for light inundation
  • a large flashlight
  • a mouth-blown horn (not a loud-hailer, but a breath-blown fog-horn)
  • signal whistle
  • signal mirror
  • flares

This equipment should be in a bag made of water-resistant materials and tied to a thwart or stowed inside a locker.


Anderson-style self-bailers are also useful for engine-driven and sailing dinghies. These slot-shaped seacocks project into the stream below the hull and open when submerged and moving rapidly. The downside of this solution is that if the boat is beached in sand, it can clog the self-bailers until the boat is inverted and the sand removed. Additionally, these devices do not replace a hand-bailer as they are only useful if the vessel is moving at a moderate speed.


A small anchor can be used to allow the crew of the dinghy to fish or rest. Traditionally, a dinghy anchor is either a mushroom shape or a small folding grapple hook with floating rope that will avoid being cut by snags on the bottom. The mushroom is used in locations where the bottom is excessively muddy while the grapple works better in currents. Some persons prefer a small danforth or plow, the same as they would use on a larger boat, but these have sharp edges, and need to be pulled-on to set.


A dinghy should not be able to scratch the mother-boat's paint, therefore a fender made from a length of heavy rope tied loosely to the outside of the bulwarks. This also provides a handhold for launching, or for men overboard to climb into the boat. Many modern dinghies have a molded ridge of plastic to replace the rope. A fitted acrylic canvas cover can shed seas or act as a shade or storage cover. Traditionally it toggles to the fender-rope or is suspended from the gunter (small folding mast) but can also be tied to a few points and secured with snaps or velcro. Velcro: hooks (left) and loops (right). ...


Customarily there is a large locker under a thwart with a bronze padlock that is left open at sea. As a rule, the locker is arranged so the boat's painter (rope to the front ring) can be locked around a mooring by placing a loop over a dowel or hook in the locker, and locking the locker.


See also

Dinghy sailing 2 GP14s, a Topper and a Graduate Dinghy sailing is the activity of sailing small boats by using (1) the sails and (2) underwater foils (centreboard and rudder). ...


External links

Types of sailing vessels and rigs
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Dinghy at AllExperts (2019 words)
Dinghies are usually rowboats or have a small outboard motor while others may use a small sailing rig.
The best size of dinghy for most yachts is about 3.5 to 4 m, because this can carry a complete family or a family's provisions for a month; however, yacht size usually is the limiting factor.
A dinghy should not be able to scratch the mother-boat's paint, therefore a fender made from a length of heavy rope tied loosely to the outside of the bulwarks.
Dinghy sailing at AllExperts (1385 words)
The Mirror Dinghy was predominantly built using stitch and glue, while the Heron is an example of a boat built using plywood on a timber frame.
In many dinghy clubs in the UK the adult members are sometimes outnumbered by junior members, and the balance of activities can change from mainly racing to increasingly providing training courses.
The examples of such dinghies are the Flying Dutchman, the Fiveohfive (505), the Fireball, the Osprey, the Javelin and the 470.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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