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Encyclopedia > Dinesh D'Souza
Dinesh D'Souza

Born April 25, 1961 (1961-04-25) (age 46)
Bombay, India
Residence Fairbanks Ranch, California
Nationality Flag of the United States United States
Known for Political Commentary
Education Dartmouth College
Princeton University
Occupation Political Writer
Political party Republican
Religious stance Roman Catholic
Spouse Dixie Brubaker
Children Danielle
Website http://www.dineshdsouza.com

Dinesh D'Souza (born April 25, 1961 in Bombay, India) is an author currently serving as the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. D'Souza is the author of numerous New York Times best selling books and one of the most prolific and prominent conservative writers and speakers in the United States. A Roman Catholic, D'Souza is also known for his writings and debates defending Christianity. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 733 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2835 × 2319 pixel, file size: 1. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , “Bombay” redirects here. ... Fairbanks Ranch is a census-designated place (CDP) in San Diego County, California, United States. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Look up republican in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , “Bombay” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Hoover Tower at the Hoover Institution The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace is a public policy think tank and library founded by Herbert Hoover at Stanford University, his alma mater. ... Stanford redirects here. ... The New York Times Best Seller List is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ... Conservative may refer to: Conservatism, political philosophy A member of a Conservative Party Conservative extension, premise of deductive logic Conservativity theorem, mathematical proof of conservative extension Conservative Judaism britney spears Category: ...

Contents

Biography and Personal Life

D'Souza was born in Bombay, India to parents who came from the state of Goa in Western India. He arrived in the United States in 1978, originally through a Rotary International program. He attended high school in Patagonia, Arizona and then attended Dartmouth College, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1983.[1][2] For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... A map of West India. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Rotary International is an organization of service clubs known as Rotary Clubs located all over the world. ... Patagonia is a town located in Santa Cruz County, Arizona. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in the undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1981, D'Souza published the names of officers of the Gay Student Alliance in an article for The Dartmouth Review, including the names of those who were still closeted.[3] The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ...


Following his graduation from Dartmouth, D'Souza moved to Princeton, New Jersey, where he worked for Concerned Alumni of Princeton, a conservative organization strongly critical of coeducation, affirmative action, and campus access to birth control.[citation needed] While at Princeton, D'Souza became the editor of a conservative monthly called "the Prospect." The paper and its writers ignited much controversy during D'Souza's editorship. The school's vice president of public affairs at the time alleged that the paper had become "outwardly destructive and irresponsible." The paper also criticized the university's minority admission policies.[4] Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... The Concerned Alumni of Princeton (CAP) was a group of politically conservative former Princeton University students that existed between 1972 and 1986. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... This box:      Affirmative actionrefers to policies intended to promote access to education or employment aimed at a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically, minorities or women). ... For other uses, see Birth control (disambiguation). ...


After his time in Princeton, D'Souza moved to Washington, D.C., where he served for two years as an editor of Policy Review, an influential conservative journal now published by the Hoover Institution. Several of D'Souza's Policy Review articles generated national attention.[citation needed] In "The Bishops as Pawns", D'Souza wrote that U.S. Catholic bishops were being manipulated by American liberals in agreeing to oppose the U.S. military buildup and use of power abroad and actually knew very little about these subjects to which they were lending their religious credibility, writing: For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Policy Review is one of Americas leading conservative journals. ... Diocesan College, or Bishops as it is commonly known, is a private school situated in the leafy suburb of Rondebosch in Cape Town, South Africa, at the foot of Table Mountain. ... This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ...

Interviews with these bishops suggest that they know little or nothing about the ideas and proposals to which they are putting their signature and lending their religious authority. The bishops are unfamiliar with existing defense and economic programs, unable to identify even in general terms the Soviet military capability, ignorant of roughly how much of the budget currently goes to defense, unclear about how much should be reallocated to social programs, and innocent of the most basic concepts underlying the intelligent layman's discussion of these questions.[5]

In 1987 D'Souza left the magazine to serve as a policy advisor in Ronald Reagan's White House until 1988. He then joined the American Enterprise Institute, where he was the institute's John M. Olin fellow, before later joining the Hoover Institution.[citation needed] Reagan redirects here. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The American Enterprise Institutes Logo The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a neoconservative think tank, founded in 1943. ...


In 1992, D'Souza married Dixie Brubaker, whom he first met during his time in Washington, D.C. They have one daughter, Danielle, and reside in Fairbanks Ranch, California. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Fairbanks Ranch is a census-designated place (CDP) in San Diego County, California, United States. ...


Prior to his marriage in 1992, D'Souza had relationships with two well-known female conservatives, Laura Ingraham, a nationally-syndicated radio commentator to whom he was engaged but never married, and best-selling conservative author and commentator Ann Coulter.[6] Laura Anne Ingraham (born June 19, 1964 in Glastonbury, Connecticut) is an American conservative talk radio host and author. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ...


During his career, D'Souza picked up the nickname "Distort D'Newza" from his more vocal critics. Although not flattering, he actually finds the nickname amusing. "I think I'm the one who thought of it!" He told SPY magazine in 1989. "I can't remember the exact orgins of Distort D'Newza, but I was very proud of it when it came out."[7]


Ideology

Human nature

D'Souza is a noted conservative, and defines conservatism in the American sense as "conserving the principles of the American Revolution".[citation needed] In Letters to a Young Conservative, written as an introduction to conservative ideas for youth, D'Souza argues that it is a blend of classical liberalism and ancient virtue, in particular, "the belief that there are moral standards in the universe and that living up to them is the best way to have a full and happy life." He also argues against what he calls the modern liberal belief that "human nature is intrinsically good," and thus that "the great conflicts in the world…arise out of terrible misunderstandings that can be corrected through ongoing conversation and through the mediation of the United Nations."[citation needed] Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military,[4] small government and promotion of states rights. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Classical liberalism (also known as traditional liberalism[1] and laissez-faire liberalism[2]) is a doctrine stressing the importance of human rationality, individual property rights, natural rights, the protection of civil liberties, constitutional limitations of government, free markets, and individual freedom from restraint as exemplified in the writings of Adam... Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


Social policy and affirmative action

D'Souza challenges beliefs and projects such as affirmative action, and social welfare. In his book Illiberal Education he argued that many universities practiced intolerance of conservative views. [citation needed] This box:      Affirmative actionrefers to policies intended to promote access to education or employment aimed at a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically, minorities or women). ... Social welfare redirects here. ...


D'Souza has often stated his belief that idealizing the rebellion against slavery is a source of disability among some African Americans. He speculates that slaves, to preserve a sense of dignity, in the circumstances of slavery, would by nature tend to be defiant. This defiance would become the central heroic reference for African-American slaves, restoring a degree of pride and dignity to all. But, he continues, the price of this would be the habitually ingrained attitude of defiance that is ultimately self-destructive. These self-destructive habits still have a legacy today, D'Souza contends, and serve to explain, in a large part, the degree to which many slave descendants suffer from social and self-esteem issues.[citation needed] Slave redirects here. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


D'Souza has attributed many modern social problems to what he calls the "cultural left". In his recent book The Enemy at Home: The Cultural Left and Its Responsibility for 9/11, he wrote that:

The cultural left in this country is responsible for causing 9/11 ... the cultural left and its allies in Congress, the media, Hollywood, the non-profit sector and the universities are the primary cause of the volcano of anger toward America that is erupting from the Islamic world. [8] A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...

Greatness of America and Multiculturalism

D'Souza's book "What's So Great About America?" (ISBN 0-142-00301-8) (Penguin, 2003), defends his adopted country against the criticisms that have been directed at it in the last couple of decades. In particular, he argues against the criticisms leveled by the Islamic world, domestic multiculturalists, those seeking slavery reparations, and especially America's left wing. Instead, he contends, Americans themselves are too critical and take for granted the "blessings" bestowed on them by living within the borders of the United States.[9] The Islamic world is the world-wide community of those who identify with Islam, known as Muslims, and who number approximately one-and-a-half billion people. ... Multiculturalism or cultural pluralism is a policy, ideal, or reality that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures in the world, especially as they relate to one another in immigrant receiving nations. ... ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms that refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially but not exclusively in the American sense of the word...


He also takes this a step further and challenges the notion that all world cultures are equal. "If one begins with the multicultural premise that all cultures are equal, then the world as it is makes very little sense," he says. "Some cultures have completely outperformed others in providing the things that all people seek -- health, food, housing, security and the amenities of life." [10]


Critic of feminism

D'Souza also criticised aspects of feminism in Letters to a Young Conservative, writing that: Feminists redirects here. ...

The feminist error was to embrace the value of the workplace as greater than the value of the home. Feminism has endorsed the public sphere as inherently more constitutive of women’s worth than the private sphere. Feminists have established as their criterion of success and self-worth an equal representation with men at the top of the career ladder. The consequence of this feminist scale of values is a terrible and unjust devaluation of women who work at home.

[citation needed]

Media appearances

D'Souza has appeared a few times on CNN, [11] [12] including on Glenn Beck (TV program). Other media appearances include ABC's Nightline, CBS's Face the Nation, FOX News Channel's Hannity & Colmes, MSNBC's Hardball with Chris Matthews, Comedy Central's The Colbert Report, and CNBC's Dennis Miller.[citation needed] The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Glenn Beck is a nightly cable news show on Headline Prime, the primetime programming block for Headline News. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Nightline is a late-night hard and soft news program broadcast by ABC in the United States, and has a franchised formula to other networks and stations elsewhere in the world. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Face The Nation logo, used until 2002. ... “Fox News” redirects here. ... Hannity & Colmes is an American talk show program on the Fox News Channel featuring host Alan Colmes, presenting a liberal angle, and host Sean Hannity, presenting a conservative angle. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... This article is about the journalist. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ... Dennis Miller (born November 3, 1953) is an American Emmy Award-winning comedian, political commentator, television personality, and talk radio host. ...


He will be debating Tufts University professor Daniel Dennett on November 30th at Tufts on the existence of a deity. Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... Daniel Clement Dennett (born March 28, 1942 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a prominent American philosopher whose research centers on philosophy of mind, philosophy of science and philosophy of biology, particularly as those fields relate to evolutionary biology and cognitive science. ...


The Enemy at Home

In early 2007, D'Souza published "The Enemy at Home: The Cultural Left and its Responsibility for 9/11," in which he argues that the American left was in large part responsible for the Muslim anger that led to the September 11 attacks.[13]


This thesis has been widely disputed by, among others, prominent conservatives such as Michelle Malkin and Hugh Hewitt, who contend that D'Souza openly sympathizes with Al Qaeda in The Enemy At Home, and who contend that his thesis that Muslim radicals would not hate the United States if not for cultural liberalism is a myth.[citation needed] Michelle Malkin (née Maglalang) (born October 20, 1970) is a socially and politically conservative American columnist, blogger, author and political commentator. ... Hugh Hewitt (born February 22, 1956) is a conservative American radio talk show host, author, and blogger. ... Map of major attacks attributed to al-Qaeda Al-Qaeda (also al-Qaida or al-Qaida or al-Qaidah) (Arabic: ‎ , translation: The Base) is an international alliance of terrorist organizations founded in 1988[4] by Osama bin Laden and other veteran Afghan Arabs after the Soviet War in...


The book was almost universally criticized in major American newspapers and magazines and called, among other things, "the worst nonfiction book about terrorism published by a major house since 9/11"[14] and "a national disgrace."[15].


D'Souza's book caused a controversy in the conservative movement, invoking a barrage of attacks back and forth between D'Souza and his conservative critics who widely mocked the thesis of his book, that the cultural left was responsible for 9/11. In response to his critics, he posted a 6,500-word essay [16] on National Review Online, and NRO subsequently published a litany of responses from conservative authors who accused D'Souza of character assassination, elitism and pseudointellectualism.[17] National Review Online is the online presence of the prominent conservative political magazine National Review. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Bibliography

Books

Books authored by Dinesh D'Souza include:

  • 1984: Falwell, Before the Millennium: A Critical Biography, Regnery Publishing (ISBN 0-89526-607-5)
  • 1986: The Catholic Classics (ISBN 0-87973-545-7)
  • 1987: My Dear Alex: Letters From The KGB (with Gregory Fossedal), Regnery Publishing (ISBN 0-89526-576-1)
  • 1991: Illiberal Education (ISBN 0-684-86384-7)
  • 1995: The End of Racism (ISBN 0-684-82524-4)
  • 1997: Ronald Reagan: How An Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary Leader (ISBN 0-684-84823-6)
  • 2000: The Virtue of Prosperity (ISBN 0-684-86815-6)
  • 2002: What's So Great About America, Regnery Publishing (ISBN 0-89526-153-7)
  • 2002: Letters to a Young Conservative (ISBN 0-465-01734-7)
  • 2007: The Enemy At Home: The Cultural Left and Its Responsibility for 9/11 (ISBN 0-385-51012-8)
  • 2007: What's So Great About Christianity, Regnery Publishing (ISBN 1-596-98517-8)

Unfit for Command, published by Regnery Publishing. ...

Articles

Articles written by Dinesh D’Souza include:

  • Moon's Planet: The Politics and Theology of the Unification Church
  • Ten Great Things About America
  • How Ronald Reagan Won The Cold War
  • Technology And Moral Progress
  • We the Slaveowners: In Jefferson's America, Were Some Men Not Created Equal?
  • The Self Esteem Hoax
  • Two Cheers For Colonialism
  • Reagan Versus The Intellectuals
  • The Crimes of Christopher Columbus [7]
  • 10 things to celebrate: Why I'm an anti-anti-American [8]
  • God Knows Why Faith is Thriving [9]

References

  1. ^ About Dinesh D’Souza. Dinesh D'Souza. Retrieved on 2007-11-12.
  2. ^ Dinesh D'Souza. NNDB. Soylent Communications. Retrieved on 2007-11-12.
  3. ^ Peter Cannellos (2007-04-19). Conservatives Sour on Rebel Media. Boston Globe.
  4. ^ "Critical Monthly Rouses Princeton", New York Times, 1984-04-29, pp. 52. Retrieved on 2007-10-01. (English) 
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ Spy Magazine, July, 1989 "The Boys Who Would Be Buckley"
  8. ^ salon.com/news, January 20, 2007
  9. ^ Thomas Sowell (2002-06-07). What's So Great About America?. Capitalism Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  10. ^ Thomas Sowell (2002-06-07). What's So Great About America?. Capitalism Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  11. ^ http://archives.cnn.com/2000/US/05/30/campus.balkanization/index.html
  12. ^ http://mediamatters.org/items/200406080008
  13. ^ salon.com/news, January 20, 2007
  14. ^ [3]
  15. ^ [4]
  16. ^ [5] The Closing of the Conservative Mind, Dinesh D'Souza, National Review Online, March 12, 2007
  17. ^ [6]

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... National Review Online is the online presence of the prominent conservative political magazine National Review. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dsouza (13230 words)
D'Souza's description of the events at Stanford is now widely acknowledged by both his critics and his allies as false, but that did not reduce its impact on readers who accepted his report as the truth.
D'Souza further claims that "Stanford provides ideological coherence to the multicultural curriculum by urging that texts be uniformly subjected to a 'race and gender' analysis, viewed from the perspective of oppressed women and persons of color."(70) In reality, Stanford urges nothing of the sort.
D'Souza's main theory is that affirmative action policies in college admissions as well as the higher education establishment's pursuit of a cirriculum that reflects some concept of multiculturalism, merely promotes ignorance and racism.
CampusProgress.org | Know Your Right-Wing Speakers: Dinesh D'Souza (1009 words)
Dinesh D’Souza, known to conscientious commentators everywhere as “Distort D’Newsa,” has been – for far too long – one of the Right’s rising stars.
D’Souza’s rise is the perfect illustration of the success that right-wing foundations have had in cultivating a generation of conservative thinkers and leaders by throwing money at them, supporting their academic work, and hooking them up with internships, government jobs, and the right conservative network.
D’Souza is currently a CNN analyst and a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, as well as at another conservative think tank, the Hoover Institute.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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