FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Diner" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Diner
Look up diner in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Manhattan's Diners.
A restaurant type diner, Bedford, Nova Scotia
A restaurant type diner, Bedford, Nova Scotia

A diner is a prefabricated restaurant building characteristic of North America, especially on Long Island; in New York City; in New Jersey, and other areas of the Northeastern United States, although examples can be found throughout the US and in Canada. Some people apply the term not only to the prefabricated structures, but also to restaurants that serve cuisine similar to traditional diner cuisine even if they are located in more traditional types of buildings. Diners are characterized by a wide range of foods, mostly American, a casual atmosphere, a counter, and late operating hours. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Image File history File links Dinner in Freehold NJ File links The following pages link to this file: New Jersey Restaurant Freehold Borough, New Jersey Americana Diner ... Image File history File links Dinner in Freehold NJ File links The following pages link to this file: New Jersey Restaurant Freehold Borough, New Jersey Americana Diner ... Freehold is a Borough located in Monmouth County, New Jersey. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Bedford (2001 pop. ... A Diner can mean: a type of North American restaurant: Diner, a commemorative coin of Andorra, issued in 5 diner coins (not legal tender), or a 1982 movie called Diner. ... Prefabrication is the practice of manufacturing the parts of an assembly in one location, ready for them to be assembled in another place. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States. ... Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ...

Contents

History

Small diner in Brooklyn
Small diner in Brooklyn

It is generally agreed that the first diner was a horse-drawn wagon equipped to serve hot food to employees of the Providence Journal, in Providence, Rhode Island in 1872. Walter Scott who ran the lunch wagon had previously supplemented his income by selling sandwiches and coffee to his fellow pressmen at the Journal from baskets he prepared at home. Commercial production of lunch wagons began in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1887. The first manufactured lunch wagons with seating appeared throughout the Northeastern US in the late 19th century, serving busy downtown locations without the need to buy expensive real estate. It is generally accepted that the name "diner" as opposed to "lunch wagon" was not widely used before 1925. As the number of seats increased, wagons gave way to pre-fabricated buildings made by many of the same manufacturers who had made the wagons. Like the lunch wagon, a diner allowed one to set up a food service business quickly using pre-assembled constructs and equipment. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Providence Journal is a daily newspaper serving the metropolitan area of Providence, Rhode Island. ... Providence may mean: Divine Providence Providence College in Rhode Island, USA Providence, television series Providence, a 1977 film Providence, a 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves Providence, 1970s-era Providence may also refer to: Providence, Rhode Island (in Providence County) Providence, Alabama Providence, Kentucky Providence, New York It is also the... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the city of Worcester in England. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Central business district. ...


Until the Great Depression, most diner manufacturers and their customers were located in the Northeast. Diner manufacturing suffered with other industries in the Depression, though not as much as others, as people still had to eat, and the diner offered a less expensive way of getting into the restaurant business as well as less expensive food than more formal establishments. After World War II, as the economy returned to civilian production and the suburbs boomed, diners were an attractive small business opportunity. During this period, diners spread beyond their original urban and small town market to highway strips in the suburbs, even reaching the Midwest, with manufacturers such as Valentine. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... A small business may be defined as a business with a small number of employees. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


In many areas, diners were superseded in the 1970s by fast food restaurants, but in parts of New Jersey, New York, New England, and Pennsylvania the independently-owned diner remains relatively common. During this period, newly-constructed diners lost their narrow, stainless steel, streamlined appearance, and grew into much bigger buildings, though often still made of several pre-fabricated modules and assembled on site and still manufactured by the old line diner builders. A wide variety of architectural styles were now used for these later diners, including Cape Cod and Colonial. The old-style single module diners featuring a long counter and a few small booths sometimes now grew additional dining rooms, lavish wallpaper, fountains, crystal chandeliers and Greek statuary. The definition of the term diner began to blur as older pre-fab diners received more conventional stick-built additions, sometimes leaving the original structure nearly unrecognizable as it was surrounded by new construction or a renovated facade. Businesses that called themselves diners but which were built onsite and not prefabricated began to appear. These larger establishments were sometimes known as diner-restaurants. Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... A Cape Cod is a style of housing that originated in the New England area. ... Mary Cassatts painting of two ladies drinking tea in a room with red-blue striped wallpapers. ... Chandelier in the Vice Presidents Ceremonial Office in the White House A chandelier is a ceiling-mounted fixture with two or more arms bearing lights. ... A stick-built home is one constructed entirely or largely on-site; that is, built on the site which it is intended to occupy upon its completion rather than in a factory or similar facility. ... For other uses, see facade (disambiguation). ...


Architecture

Inside a diner

Like a mobile home, the original style diner is narrow and elongated and allows roadway transportation. In the case of the diner, this is a carry-over from the first "true" diners ever built, which were never intended to remain stationary. The original diners (as opposed to "dining wagons") were actual dining cars on railways. When a dining car was no longer fit for service, it was often employed as a cheap restaurant at a (stationary) location near a trainstation or along the side of the railroad at some other location.[2] Download high resolution version (533x640, 69 KB)At a diner Downloaded from : [[1]] Credits : Dennis Mojado File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (533x640, 69 KB)At a diner Downloaded from : [[1]] Credits : Dennis Mojado File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A modern double-wide manufactured home. ...

The Summit Diner in Summit New Jersey, is a prototypical "rail car" style diner.
The Summit Diner in Summit New Jersey, is a prototypical "rail car" style diner.

Later, tradition--along with equipment designed to build railcars--kept this size and shape. In this original floorplan, a service counter dominates the interior, with a preparation area against the back wall and floor-mounted stools for the customers in front. Larger models may have a row of booths against the front wall and at the ends. The decor varied over time. Diners of the 1920s1940s feature Art Deco elements or copy the appearance of rail dining cars (though very few are, in fact, refurbished rail cars). They featured porcelain enamel exteriors, some with the name written on the front, others with bands of enamel, others in flutes. Many had a "barrel vault" roofline. Tile floors were common. Diners of the 1950s tended to use stainless steel panels, porcelain enamel, glass blocks, terrazzo floors, Formica and neon sign trim. The 1920s they were sexy referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 630 foot (192 m) high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ... Neon signs are often used to advertise for hotels, bars and entertainment venues. ...


Diners built recently generally have a different type of architecture; they are laid out more like restaurants, retaining some aspects of traditional diner architecture (stainless steel and Art Deco elements, usually) while discarding others (the small size, and emphasis on the counter)


Cultural significance

Interior of the 1938 sterling manufactured diner in Wellsboro, Pennsylvania - note curved ceiling
Interior of the 1938 sterling manufactured diner in Wellsboro, Pennsylvania - note curved ceiling

Diners attract a wide spectrum of the local populations, and are generally small businesses. They are often seen as quintessentially American, reflecting the perceived cultural diversity and egalitarian nature of the country at large. Nighthawks (1942) is a well known American painting depicting a diner and its occupants. Wellsboro is a borough in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Williamsport. ... A small business may be defined as a business with a small number of employees. ... Egalitarianism (derived from the French word égal, meaning equal or level) is a political doctrine that holds that all people should be treated as equals from birth. ... This article is about the painting by Edward Hopper. ...


In television and cinema (e.g. The Blob, The Iron Giant and Diner), diners and soda fountains symbolize the period of prosperity and optimism in White America in the 1950s. They are shown as the place where teenagers meet after school and as an essential part of a date. The television show Alice used a "diner" as the setting for the program. The diner's cultural influence continues today. Many non-prefab restaurants (including franchises like Denny's) have copied the look of 1950s diners for nostalgic appeal, while Waffle House uses an interior layout derived from the diner. For other meanings of this term, see Blob. ... The Iron Giant is a 1999 animated science fiction film, directed by Brad Bird, produced by Warner Bros. ... Diner (1982) is a film written and directed by Barry Levinson which along with Avalon, Tin Men, and Liberty Heights constitutes his series of Baltimore films. ... Soda fountain is a North American term referring to the carbonated drink dispensers found in fast food restaurants and convenience stores in the US and Canada. ... “Young Men” redirects here. ... Suitor redirects here. ... Alice is a top-rated American television sitcom series which ran from August 31, 1976 to July 2, 1985 on CBS. The series was based on the 1974 film, Alice Doesnt Live Here Anymore. ... Dennys is the largest full-service family restaurant chain in the United States. ... One may feel nostalgic for the familiar routine of school, conveniently forgetting the painful experiences such as bullying. ... Waffle House is a restaurant chain with 1500 stores found in twenty-five states in the United States. ...


Diners provide, in rather the same way that fast food chains do, a nationwide, recognizable, fairly uniform place to eat and assemble. The types of food served are likely to be consistent, especially within a region (exceptions being districts with large immigrant populations, in which diners and coffee shops will often cater their menus to those local cuisines), as are the prices charged. At the same time, diners have much more individuality than fast food chains; the structures, menus, and even owners and staff, while having a certain degree of similarity to each other, vary much more widely than the more rigidly standardized chain and franchise restaurants. Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... Coffee Shop is a song by the Red Hot Chili Peppers from their 1995 album, One Hot Minute. ...


Diners frequently stay open 24 hours a day, especially in cities, making them an essential part of urban culture, alongside bars and nightclubs. Many diners were historically placed near factories which operated 24 hours a day, with night shift workers providing a key part of the customer base. A night shift is either a group of workers who work during the night, or the period in which they work. ...


Cuisine and ethnicity

Diners almost invariably serve American food such as hamburgers, french fries, club sandwiches, Happy Waitresses and so on. Much of the food is grilled, as early diners were based around a grill. There is often an emphasis on breakfast foods such as eggs (including omelettes), waffles, pancakes, and French toast. Some diners serve these "breakfast foods" day round. Many diners have transparent display cases in or behind the counter for the desserts. It is common with new diners to have the desserts displayed in rotating pie cases. This article is about the food item. ... French fried potatoes, commonly known as French fries or fries (North America) or chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Commonwealth) are pieces of potato that have been chopped into batons and deep fried. ... A typical club sandwich A club sandwich, also called a clubhouse sandwich, is a type of sandwich most frequently served as a double-decker, requiring three (rather than two) slices of bread. ... A Happy Waitress is sandwich usually served at diners. ... It has been suggested that Gas grill parts be merged into this article or section. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... An omelette Ham, cheese, and vegetable omelette served with fresh fruit. ... A French-style waffle. ... Two American-style pancakes A pancake is a batter cake fried in a pan or on a griddle with oil or butter. ... For the band, see French Toast (band) French toast serving French toast (often known as eggy bread in the UK, pain perdu in French) is a popular breakfast food in North America, Europe and Hong Kong. ... Not to be confused with Desert. ...


Like their British counterparts the typical American greasy spoon serves mainly fried or grilled food, for example: fried eggs, bacon, burgers, hot dogs, hash browns, waffles, pancakes, omelettes, deep fried chicken and sausages. These are often accompanied by baked beans, french fries, cole slaw, or toast. Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... For other uses, see Bacon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the food item. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Hash browns or hashed browns is a simple potato preparation in which potato pieces are pan-fried after being diced, riced, or julienned. ... This article is about the food item. ... Two pancakes with maple syrup. ... An omelette Ham, cheese, and vegetable omelette served with fresh fruit. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... Baked beans and scrambled egg on toast. ... French fried potatoes, commonly known as French fries or fries (North America) or chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Commonwealth) are pieces of potato that have been chopped into batons and deep fried. ... Coleslaw (or Cole Slaw) is a salad of finely-shredded raw cabbage and sometimes shredded carrots, dressed with a mayonnaise, milk, or vinegar_based dressing. ... This article is about the food. ...


Some dishes at greasy spoons are regional. In Michigan and the Ohio Valley at Coney Island-style restaurants, coney dogs are served. In Indiana, fried pork tenderloin sandwiches are typically on the menu. The Northeast has more of a focus on seafood, with fried clams and fried shrimp commonly found in Maine. In the mid-Atlantic states, cheesesteak sandwiches and scrapple are fixtures in most diners. In the southwest, tamales. In the southern US, typical dishes include grits, biscuits and gravy, and country fried steak. This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses see Coney Island (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Categories: Pages needing attention | Animal stubs ... Superfamilies Alpheoidea Atyoidea Bresilioidea Campylonotoidea Crangonoidea Galatheacaridoidea Nematocarcinoidea Oplophoroidea Palaemonoidea Pandaloidea Pasiphaeoidea Procaridoidea Processoidea Psalidopodoidea Stylodactyloidea True shrimp are swimming, decapod crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Cheesesteak with Cheez Whiz The cheesesteak, known outside the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area as the Philadelphia cheesesteak, Philly cheesesteak, or steak and cheese is a sandwich principally of thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese on a long roll. ... A plate of scrapple Scrapple is a savory mush in which cornmeal and flour, often buckwheat flour, are simmered with pork scraps and trimmings, then formed into a loaf. ... For the city in Ghana, see Tamale, Ghana A tamale or tamal (from Nahuatl tamalli) is a traditional Mexican foodstuff that begins with corn (maize) flour mixed with water and lard. ... This article is about the corn-based Southern U.S. food. ... A typical order of biscuits and gravy, with a side of homefries. ... Chicken fried steak or country fried steak is a food preparation associated with soul food and Southern U.S. cuisine, particularly Texas. ...


Coffee is ubiquitous, but often stereotyped as being hours old and strong from cooking down on a warmer. Alcoholic drinks are not usually sold. Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ...


In American greasy spoons, common desserts are pie, particularly apple pie and cherry pie, often on view in a transparent case. This article is about the baked good, for other uses see Pie (disambiguation). ...


The food is usually quite inexpensive, and a decent meal (sandwich, side dish, drink) can be had for about an hour's wages at minimum wage. The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ...


Several ethnic influences are strongly present in the diner industry. A disproportionate number of diners, especially in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut are owned or operated by Greek Americans, and there are also a large number with a strong Eastern European influence, chiefly Polish, Ukrainian, and Eastern European Jewish[citation needed]. Italian Americans also have a notable presence[citation needed]. These influences can be seen in certain common additions to diner menus, such as Greek moussaka, Slavic blintzes, and Jewish matzah ball soup[citation needed]. Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... Musakka/Moussakas Moussaka ([musaka]; Greek: ; Romanian: ; Turkish: ; South Slavic: мусака/​musaka; Armenian: ; Arabic: musaqqaa) is a traditional eggplant (aubergine)-based dish in the Balkans and the Middle East, but most closely associated with Greece and Turkey. ... Home-made Russian-style blini with sour cream, roe and chopped onion. ... Matzah balls, also known as knaydlach (pl. ...


Stereotypical image

In America, greasy spoons have a somewhat better reputation than in Britain, with menus associated with comfort food and Southern cooking — foods which are considered desirable but unhealthy due to high fat content (made higher by the fattier, less expensive cuts of meat often served). Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... The term comfort food refers to a style of familiar, simple food or drink that is usually home-cooked, or consumed in informal restaurants. ... The Southern United States has a distinct cuisine that draws heavily on influences of the various groups that have inhabited the area. ... For other uses, see FAT. Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. ...


Restaurants have often been located in low-to-middle class neighborhoods, or sometimes nestled in downtown areas catering primarily to the breakfast and lunch crowds, or on highways catering to travelers and cross-country truck drivers. In many respects however, the extent to which diners have become an American institution is reflected in their prevalence throughout cities and suburbs around the country.


References

  • Witzel, Michael Karl (1998). The American Diner. MBI Publishing Company. ISBN 0-7603-0110-7. 
  • Hibbard, Christopher. Interview with George Schelling (2nd Generation Co-owner, Master Diners, Pequannock, New Jersey). 5 Aug. 1998

is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

See also

Coffee Shop is a song by the Red Hot Chili Peppers from their 1995 album, One Hot Minute. ... Diner Lingo was/is used as a waiter/cook shorthand in diners and diner-style restaurants. ... The Regency Cafe in Pimlico, London, is a well-preserved 1940s greasy spoon cafe. ... A roadside attraction is a feature along the side of a road, that is frequently advertised with billboards to attract tourists. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Diner
Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Diner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (609 words)
Diners were superseded in the 1970s by fast food restaurants such as McDonalds, Burger King, Wendy's, and Kentucky Fried Chicken.
Like a mobile home, a diner is narrow and elongated to allow roadway transport (in the case of a diner, to the restaurant's ultimate location).
Diners in a certain part of western New York State, northeastern Ohio, and northwestern Pennsylvania are commonly spelled Dinor rather than the traditional Diner.
diner - definition of diner in Encyclopedia (139 words)
Diners are an important pop-culture memory for many.
Diner is an American word for a kind of restaurant.
The diner has become a focal point of nostalgic Americana, a symbol of the presumed wholesome innocence of the 1930s-1950s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m