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Encyclopedia > Dimetrodon
Dimetrodon
Fossil range: Early Permian
Restoration of Dimetrodon
Restoration of Dimetrodon
Conservation status
Prehistoric
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Synapsida
Order: Pelycosauria
Family: Sphenacodontidae
Genus: Dimetrodon
Cope, 1878
Species
  • D. milleri
  • D. natalis
  • D. limbatus
  • D. booneorum
  • D. gigashomogenes
  • D. grandis
  • D. loomisi
  • D. angelensis
  • D. teutonis
Dimetrodon grandis skeleton at the
National Museum of Natural History

Dimetrodon (/daɪˈmɛ.tɹəʊˌdɒn/) ("two measures of teeth"), was a predatory synapsid ('mammal-like reptile') genus that flourished during the Permian Period, living between 280 and 265 million years ago. It was more closely related to mammals than to true reptiles (Sauropsida), like dinosaurs, lizards and birds. The Permian is a geologic period that extends from about 299. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x885, 43 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dimetrodon Wikipedia:WikiProject Dinosaurs/Image review User:ArthurWeasley:Permian ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Orders & Suborders Order Pelycosauria * Suborder Caseasauria Suborder Eupelycosauria * Order Therapsida * Suborder Biarmosuchia Suborder Dinocephalia Suborder Anomodontia Suborder Gorgonopsia Suborder Therocephalia Suborder Cynodontia * For complete phylogeny, see text. ... Groups Caseasauria Eothyrididae Caseidae Eupelycosauria Varanopseidae Ophiacodontidae Edaphosauridae Sphenacodontia Sphenacodontidae Therapsida The pelycosaurs (from Greek pelyx, bowl + sauros, lizard) were smallish to large (up to 3 meters or more) primitive Late Paleozoic synapsids. ... Genera Haptodus Secodontosaurus Sphenacodon Ctenospondylus Dimetrodon The Sphenacodontidae are a family of small to large, advanced, carnivorous, Late Pennsylvanian to middle Permian pelycosaurs. ... Edward Drinker Cope Edward Drinker Cope (July 28, 1840–April 12, 1897) was an American paleontologist and comparative anatomist, as well as a noted herpetologist and ichthyologist. ... Fossil skeleton of Dimetrodon grandis, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC; digital photo by User:Postdlf, 2/20/05 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Fossil skeleton of Dimetrodon grandis, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC; digital photo by User:Postdlf, 2/20/05 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Inside the National Museum of Natural History, underneath the rotunda. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Orders & Suborders Order Pelycosauria * Suborder Caseasauria Suborder Eupelycosauria * Order Therapsida * Suborder Biarmosuchia Suborder Dinocephalia Suborder Anomodontia Suborder Gorgonopsia Suborder Therocephalia Suborder Cynodontia * For complete phylogeny, see text. ... Mammal-like reptiles is a term used to describe the prehistoric animals that appear to be the reptilian ancestors of mammals. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... The Permian is a geologic period that extends from about 299. ... A geologic period is a subdivision of geologic time that divides an era into smaller timeframes. ... Mega-annum, usually abbreviated as Ma, is a unit of time equal to one million years. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in female mammary glands and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex region in... Superclasses Anapsida Eurapsida Diapsida Reptilia was an old kingdom or phylum classification that has since been divided into 4 classes. ... Orders Saurischia    Sauropodomorpha    Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs are giant reptiles that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for most of their 165-million year existence. ... For other uses, see Lizard (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ...


Dimetrodon was not a dinosaur, despite being popularly grouped with them. Rather, it is classified as a pelycosaur. It is surprisingly well-known to the general public and makes an appearance in the James Mason film Journey to the Center of the Earth, as well as in Yor, the Hunter from the Future. Fossils of Dimetrodon have been found in North America and Europe. The climate of Europe and North America in the Early Permian, was probably arid to continental, so Dimetrodon was probably adaptable. [citation needed] Groups see text The pelycosaurs (from Greek pelyx meaning bowl and sauros meaning lizard) were primitive Late Paleozoic synapsid amniotes. ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... Journey to the Center of the Earth is a 1959 adventure movie. ... Yor, Hunter from the Future is a film released in 1983. ... In general terms, the climate of a locale or region is said to be arid when it is characterized by a severe lack of available water, to the extent of hindering or even preventing the growth and development of plant and animal life. ... Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ...

Contents

Description

Dimetrodon was an apex predator, among the largest of its day. It grew to up to 3 meters (9.8 feet) in length. The name Dimetrodon means 'two-measures of teeth', so named because it had a large skull with two different types of teeth (shearing teeth and sharp canine teeth), unlike reptiles. Dentition showing this differentiation of teeth is called heterodonty. It walked on four side-sprawling legs and had a large tail. Dimetrodon may have moved in a manner similar to present-day lizards. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The anatomical term heterodont (from Greek, meaning different teeth) refers to animals which possess more than a single tooth morphology. ... For other uses, see Lizard (disambiguation). ...


Sail

The most distinctive characteristic of Dimetrodon was the spectacular sail on its back (another pelycosaur, Edaphosaurus, also has this trait). The sail was probably used to regulate body temperature; the surface area would allow it to warm up or cool off more efficiently. This adaptation was important because it would give the animal more time to hunt prey. The sail may also have been used in mating rituals and to warn off other predators. The sail was supported by neural spines, each one sprouting from an individual vertebra. Bramwell and Fellgett (1973) calculate that a 200 kg Dimetrodon would heat up from 26° C to 32° C in 205 minutes without a sail and in only 80 minutes with a sail.[1] Edaphosaurus was much like the Dimetrodon but ate plants and screeched in a high pitched tone that often sounded like Boris, dont touch me there! ... A diagram of a thoracic vertebra. ... A diagram of a thoracic vertebra. ...


Relationship with modern mammals

As a synapsid, Dimetrodon was distantly related to humans and all other modern mammals. Synapsids were the first tetrapods to evolve differentiated (or heterodont) teeth. Whereas reptiles hardly chew their food, simply gulping it down, synapsids like Dimetrodon developed teeth to help shear meat into smaller pieces for easier ingestion. These 'two-measure teeth' eventually gave rise to the various kinds of teeth present in modern mammals. For more information on human ancestry, see timeline of human evolution. This article is about modern humans. ... Orders & Suborders Order Pelycosauria * Suborder Caseasauria Suborder Eupelycosauria * Order Therapsida * Suborder Biarmosuchia Suborder Dinocephalia Suborder Anomodontia Suborder Gorgonopsia Suborder Therocephalia Suborder Cynodontia * For complete phylogeny, see text. ... Groups See text. ... Types of teeth Molars are used for grinding up foods Carnassials are used for slicing food. ... Reptilia redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In popular culture

A composite of Edaphosaurus and Dimetrodon fossils[2] went on display in 1907 in the American Museum of Natural History, New York, presented by the curator of vertebrate paleontology Henry Fairfield Osborn and illustrated in the pages of Scientific American (May 1907) as "Naosaurus", by the great scientific illustrator Charles R. Knight. Edaphosaurus was much like the Dimetrodon but ate plants and screeched in a high pitched tone that often sounded like Boris, dont touch me there! ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Henry Fairfield Osborn (August 8, 1857 — November 6, 1935) was an American paleontologist and geologist. ... Scientific American is a popular-science magazine, published (first weekly and later monthly) since August 28, 1845, making it the oldest continuously published magazine in the United States. ... Allosaurus by Charles R. Knight. ...


In the Super Sentai series and their counterparts in Power Rangers the Dimetrodon was a mecha/Zord in Bakuryuu Sentai Abaranger/Power Rangers: Dino Thunder. The official logo of the Super Sentai Series introduced in 2000 during the run of Mirai Sentai Timeranger The Super Sentai Series ) is the name given to the long running Japanese superhero team genre of shows produced by Toei Company Ltd. ... The Saban-era logo for Power Rangers The Disney/Jetix-era logo for Power Rangers Power Rangers is a long-running American childrens television series adapted from the Japanese tokusatsu Super Sentai Series, though it is not simply an English dub of the original. ... Bakuryuu Sentai Abaranger , translated as Blastasaur 1 Squadron Abaranger 2) was Toei Company Limiteds twenty-seventh production of the Super Sentai television series. ... Power Rangers: Dino Thunder are the twelfth generation of Power Rangers. ...


In the television documentary Walking With Monsters (called Before the Dinosaurs in the U.S.), baby Dimetrodon were shown hatching with sails, fully independent. In fact, no Dimetrodon eggs have yet been found and it's entirely possible that the sail, which would be hard to store in an egg, was either absent or not rigid upon hatching. The program also stated that Dimetrodon consumed 90% of a carcass, while lions today eat 70% and that Dimetrodon would only eat intestines after shaking out the waste inside, since "dung is one thing a Dimetrodon can't stomach." Hatchlings also had to sprint towards trees after hatching in order to escape cannibalistic adults. These behaviours seem to be based on the Komodo Dragon and attributing them to Dimetrodon is entirely speculative. Dimetrodon was also shown as having an egg-laying style similar to the modern crocodile, burying eggs in mounds of sand, adding or removing sand when needed. Walking with Monsters (also distributed as Before the Dinosaurs: Walking With Monsters) is a three-part British documentary film series about life in the Paleozoic, bringing to life extinct arthropods, fish, amphibians, synapsids, and reptiles. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Ouwens, 1912 Komodo dragon distribution The Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis), also known as the Komodo Monitor[1], Komodo Island Monitor[1], Ora (to the natives of Komodo[2]), or simply Komodo, is the largest living species of lizard, growing to an average length of 2-3 metres (approximately... Genera Mecistops Crocodylus Osteolaemus See full taxonomy. ...


Dimetrodons will also be featured in the video game Zoo Tycoon 2: Extinct Animals, with a dark green body and red sail colour scheme.


In Strong Bad episode "Trading Cards", Strong Bad is seen fanning himself with a dimetrodon in the series of "Strong Bad bench presses dinosaurs" trading cards. Strong Bad is a primary character in the fictional world of Flash animation cartoon series Homestar Runner. ...


Gallery

See also

Edaphosaurus was much like the Dimetrodon but ate plants and screeched in a high pitched tone that often sounded like Boris, dont touch me there! ... Species ? ? Haptodus was a small sphenacodont, a lineage that includes therapsids. ... Species Sphenacodon britannicus Sphenacodon ferox Sphenacodon ferocior Sphenacodon was a pelycosaur that was 10 feet in length. ...

References

  1. ^ Bramwell, C. D.; Fellgett, P.P. (1973). "Thermal regulation in sail lizards". Nature 242: 203-205. Retrieved on 2007-03-29. 
  2. ^ Both came from Permian strata in Texas.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dimetrodon (Dimetrodon angelensis) (523 words)
The Dimetrodon was a flesh eater, a carnivore
Although, the Dimetrodon may not be a runner, it is thought to be a fast walker and because of it's sail like fin, it may appeared larger to other animals.
Other paleontologists thought the Dimetrodons would mate in the spring and the eggs would hatch in mid summer.The female lays her eggs in rotten wood, a hole in the ground, or elsewhere on land.
Palaeos Vertebrates 390.400 Synapsida: Sphenacodontia (1351 words)
Dimetrodon was the dominant predator in its environment for some twenty-five million years, during which time it evolved through about a dozen species, become steadily larger as time progressed (an example of "Cope's Law").
Dimetrodon legs, although strong, were short, so it may have hunted through ambushing its prey, the sail on the back also no doubt serving to help camoflague the creature when it hid among stands of bamboo-like Calamite plants.
Dimetrodon is such a well-known creature it's even featured in most popular books on dinosaurs (even though it is not a dinosaur, and not even related).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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