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Encyclopedia > Dillard University
Dillard University
Motto Ex Fide, Fortis - (From Faith, Courage)
Established 1869
School type Coeducational, Comprehensive Liberal Arts
Affiliations Private, United Church of Christ, United Methodist Church, Historically Black College and Universities, and UNCF founding member
President Dr. Marvalene Hughes
Location New Orleans, LA USA
Campus Urban
Enrollment 1,124 undergraduate total enrollment (Spring 2006)
Faculty 100 Full-time; 20 Adjuncts (11:1 Student-Faculty Ratio)
Athletic teams Blue Devils
Colors Blue and White
Homepage www.dillard.edu

Dillard University is a private, liberal arts college in New Orleans, Louisiana. Its address is 2601 Gentilly Blvd, 70122. Founded in 1869 and historically African American, it is affiliated with the United Church of Christ and the United Methodist Church. 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... In the United States, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) (a type of Minority Serving Institution or MSI) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African-American community. ... Dr. Marvalene Hughes has been the president of Dillard University since 2005. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... NOLA redirects here. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ...


The present campus near Gentilly Boulevard and the London Avenue Canal was established in the 1930s. The London Avenue Canal in New Orleans, Louisiana does not connect Lake Pontchartrain to the Mississippi River. ... The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ...

Contents

History

Early Years, 1869-1930

The history of Dillard University dates back to 1869 and its founding predecessor institutions--Straight University and Union Normal School. Responding to the post-Civil War need to educate newly freed African Americans in New Orleans, Louisiana and the surrounding region, the American Missionary Association of the Congregational Church founded Straight University on June 12, and Union Normal School was established by the Freedman's Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church on July 8. In addition to Straight University, the AMA helped found several other Historically Black Colleges and Universities, such as Clark Atlanta University, Fisk University, Hampton University, Howard University (with Freedmen's Bureau), Huston-Tillotson University, LeMoyne-Owen College, Talladega College, and Tougaloo College. Straight University and Union Normal School later became Straight College and New Orleans University, respectively. Both schools offered elementary level education, but quickly enlarged curriculum to include secondary, collegiate, and professional level instruction. Categories: University stubs | Universities and colleges in Louisiana | Dillard University ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... The American Missionary Association was a Protestant-based abolitionist group founded on September 3, 1846. ... The Freedmans Aid Society was originally founded as the Fugitives Aid Society; to assist Fugitive slaves and to lobby and protest against slavery in the United States. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ...


New Orleans University operated a secondary school--Gilbert Academy. By the 1890s, the university offered professional medical training. It included a school of pharmacy, the Flint Medical College, and the Sarah Goodridge Hospital and Nurse Training School. After the medical college was ended in 1911, the Flint Goodridge Hospital emerged and continued nurse training.


Straight College also offered professional training, including a law department from 1874 to 1886, and its graduates participated in local and national Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction era civil rights struggles. For example, 1876 Straight University Law School graduate, Louis André Martinet, published The Crusader--a civil rights daily, co-founded the Comité des Citoyens (Citizens' Committee), and played a significant role in the Plessy v. Ferguson landmark Supreme Court case.[1] Other notable alumni includes, P.B.S. Pinchback (first African American governor of a U.S. state), Alice Dunbar Nelson (Harlem Renaissance foremother), and Dr. James W. Ames (founded first Detroit hospital to admit blacks). For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Plessy redirects here. ... Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback (May 10, 1837 - December 21, 1921) was the first African-American to become governor of a U.S. State. ... Alice Dunbar-Nelson (July 19, 1875 - September 18, 1935) was an African American poet, journalist and political activist. ...


"A Great Negro University in New Orleans": 1930-1935

By the late 1920's, local Black and White leaders felt there was a need for a larger, more notable African American institution of higher learning to emerge within New Orleans and the greater region. Due to economic hardships and rounds of negotiations between the two institutions, Straight College and New Orleans University chartered Dillard University on June 6, 1930. [2] "The New university would offer a traditional liberal arts curriculum--rather than nonprofessional, vocational training" and emphasize a close engagement with the Black community through "various education extension programs, societies, and clubs."[3]


Despite the hope of this new charter, the building of Dillard University was tempered by its context of Jim Crow America. Many local Whites took concern with the possibility of a Black president presiding over White faculty members. Similarly, the increased numbers of African American bus riders in the Gentilly area disturb some White sensibilities.


Despite this resistance, Dillard University opened its doors in the fall of 1935, and was able to attract a number of prominent scholars, such as Horace Mann Bond, psychology and education; Frederick Douglass Hall, music; Lawrence D. Reddick, history; and St. Clair Drake, sociology and anthropology. Horace Mann Bond 1904 - 1972 in Nashville, Tennessee was a noted Educator, Writer, and the Father of Julian Bond. ... Born January 2, 1911 in Suffolk Virginia St Claire Drake was one of the most influential African-American sociologists of the twentieth century. ...


Academics

Degrees and Majors

Dillard University offers Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees in over 35 majors. The diverse major, minor, and course offerings create an opportunities for a comprehensive, global education. These majors are organized within six academic divisions, and further subdivided by departments:

  • Division of Business
    • Accounting
    • Business Management
    • Economics and Finance
    • International Business and World Languages
      • International Business and French
      • International Business and Japanese
      • International Business and Spanish
    • International Finance and World Languages
      • International Finance and Japanese Studies
      • International Finance and Latin American Studies
    • Marketing/MIS
  • Division of Education & Psychology
    • Early Childhood (grades PK-3)
    • Elementary Education (grades 1-5)
    • Secondary Education (grades 6-12)
      • Biology Secondary Education
      • English Secondary Education
      • Mathematics Secondary Education
      • Social Studies Secondary Education
    • Special Education (mild/moderate: grades 1-12)
    • Educational Studies
    • Psychology
  • Division of Humanities
    • Art/Visual Art
    • English
      • Creative Writing (minor only)
    • Mass Communications
      • Public Relations Concentration
      • Television Production Concentration
      • Print Concentration
      • Recording Arts Concentration
      • Broadcasting Concentration
    • Sacred Music
    • Music Performance
      • Piano, Organ, and Band Instruments
      • Voice
    • Music Business Management
    • Business Management and Art
    • Philosophy and Religion
    • Theatre Arts
      • Performance Track
      • Theatre Technology Track
      • Theatre Management Track
    • Women's Studies (minor only)
    • World Languages
      • French & Francophone Studies
      • Japanese Studies
      • Spanish & Portuguese/Brazilian Studies (Concentration in Latin American Studies)
      • Spanish (Business Language)
      • German (concentration/minor only)
  • Division of Natural Sciences
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Computer Science
      • Management Option
      • Science and Technology Option
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
      • Pre-Engineering/Science and Technology Option
      • Pre-Engineering/Computer Engineering Option
      • Pre-Engineering/Chemical Engineering Option
    • Public Health
      • Health Systems Management Track
      • Community Health Education Track
      • Health Sciences Track
        • Pre-Physical Therapy
        • Pre-Occupational Therapy
  • Division of Nursing
    • Nursing
  • Division of Social Sciences
    • African World Studies
    • History
    • Political Science
    • Sociology
      • Sociology
      • Sociology/Criminal Justice
      • Sociology/Social Work
    • Urban Studies and Public Policy

Institute of Jazz Culture (IOJC)

Nurtured in the "Birthplace of Jazz," Dillard University recognized the unique possibilities that is provided by this context. The Institute of Jazz Culture was established in 2002 by founding director, Irvin Mayfield at the intersection of community, jazz and education. Under the current leadership of Edward Anderson, Assistant Professor of Music and Director of the IOJC, the Institute is producing curriculum and programming on the collegiate and the secondary levels. It emphasizes the development of talent and promotes professional opportunities. Preservation, promotion and celebration through documentation, education, and performance of jazz culture are the central goals. Irvin Mayfield, Jr. ...


Campus: "Gleaming White and Spacious Green"

Dillard University's campus is located on 55 acres in the suburban-like Gentilly neighborhood of the historic 7th Ward district of New Orleans. The picturesque campus is anchored by Neoclassical architecture and stately live oak trees. The double tree-lined "Avenue of the Oaks" form the focal point of the gated campus. Gentilly is a broad section of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The 7th Ward is a section of New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Academic Buildings

DUICEF (Dillard University International Center for Economic Freedom) is the university's newest building, dedicated in 2004. It houses the offices of the Division of Education & Psychology and the Division of Social Sciences, and computer and language laboratories.


Howard House, built in 1936, was originally a guest house, but currently is home to the business program. The building was named in honor of New Orleanian native Alvin Pike Howard (1889-1937), successful businessman, former professor of Tulane University and former director of Hibernia National Bank; he is a noteworthy contributor to the development of Dillard University.


Rosenwald Hall is a hall at Dillard University. Dillard's first permanent building was originally the campus library. It was built in May 1934. The building is named in honor of philanthropist Julius Rosenwald, to whom the building was dedicated in June 1948. This building houses the university's administrative offices and was under construction due to damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. It will be fully operational in the fall 2008. The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Julius Rosenwald Julius Rosenwald (born August 12, 1862 in Springfield, Illinois - January 6, 1932) was a U.S. manufacturer, business executive, and philanthropist. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Samuel DuBois Cook Fine Arts and Communications Center at Dillard University, New Orleans, was built in 1993. Building is named in honor of Dillard University's sixth president Dr. Samuel DuBois Cook. With his tenure came the start of the modernization of Dillard University's infrastructure. In the building are the Fine Arts Gallery and studios, state-of-the-art television and recording studios, the Music Department, the thriving Drama Department and a theater, and a radio station. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...


Stern Hall is a hall at Dillard University. Dillard's science building was built in 1952. It's named in honor of Edgar Bloom Stern, prominent financier and philanthropist of New Orleans. The building was renovated in 1952 and again in 1968. In the building are the Division of Nursing, Division of Natural Sciences, two computer labs, Biology, Chemistry and Physics labs as well as a learning center sponsored by the Louisiana Alliance for Minority Participation (LAMP) program. Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the practice in general. ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...


Library

Will W. Alexander Library is Dillard University's library. It was built in 1961. The library was dedicated in honor of the first acting president of Dillard University, the Rev. Will W. Alexander on October 22, 1961. The library houses an extensive collection of books, journals, microform and newspapers, as well as such historical documents as the papers of the American Missionary Association of the United Church of Christ. The library was damaged in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and reopened as a state-of-the-art facility in April 2008. Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Missionary Association was a Protestant-based abolitionist group founded on September 3, 1846. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ...


Chapel

Lawless Memorial Chapel is a Dillard University's chapel. It was built in 1955. Chapel was dedicated to the memory of Dr. Alfred Lawless Jr. and his son Theodore K. Lawless M.D. on October 23, 1955. Now named Lawless Assembly Hall, it is the only building on Dillard's campus that did not suffer flood damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Theodore K. Lawless (1892-1971) was a noted dermatologist, medical researcher, and philanthropist. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


On-Campus Housing

Camphor Hall is a hall at Dillard University, New Orleans. It was built in 1947. This female dormitory was originally a male dormitory. Building was named in honor of Louisiana native, educator and missionary, Bishop Alexander Priestly Camphor. Due to damage from Hurricane Katrina, only the first floor of Camphor-Hartzell annex is used for office space for the Division of Student Success. It is currently not in use as dormitory space. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Alexander Priestly Camphor (1865 – 1919) was an American Missionary Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, elected in 1916. ...


Hartzell Hall is a dormitory at Dillard University. It was built in 1935. Hartzell is named in honor of Joseph Crane Hartzell, a missionary bishop for the Methodist Episcopal Church. Building was originally a junior and senior female dormitory, and is currently not in use as dormitory space due to damage from Hurricane Katrina. 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Joseph Crane Hartzell 1 June 1842 – 6 September 1929 ) was an American Missionary Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church who served in the United States and in Africa. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ...


Nelson Complex consisted of three modular buildings that served as undergraduate housing for students. Named after William Nelson, the first African American president of the university. It was destroyed by fire during Hurricane Katrina This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Straight Hall is a dormitory at Dillard University. It was built in 1936 and renovated in 1957, Straight Hall was originally a female dormitory in its earliest days. The building is named in honor of Seymour Straight, president of the Board of Trustees of Straight College which opened in 1869 and later in 1930 merged with New Orleans University to form Dillard University. This dormitory is not in use due to damage following Hurricane Katrina. Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... Categories: University stubs | Universities and colleges in Louisiana | Dillard University ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Williams Hall is a female dormitory building located to the left of Kearny hall. Dedicated in honor of noted New Orleanian educator and philanthropist Fannie C. Williams(1882-1980) in June 1946. The building was renovated in 2000 and became a co-ed dormitory in 2004. Fannie C. Williams, an educator, was born in Biloxi, Mississippi. ...


Gentilly Gardens


Off-Campus Housing

Dillard University Apartment Living (DUALs)


Elysian Fields Apartments


Athletic Buildings

Dent Hall Dent Hall at Dillard University, New Orleans, is the university's gymnasium. It was named in honor of Dr. Albert W. Dent, the university's third president. It was built in 1969 at the end of his service. Dent Hall is the home of the Blue Devils and the Lady Blue Devils basketball teams (Athletics Department). In this building are The Division of Campus Life, Career Services, Student Development, Student Government Association,the Honors Program, offices, classrooms, computer labs, a dance studio, a weight center and a newly renovated swimming pool. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... This article is about the sport. ...


Henson Hall Henson Hall is Dillard University's old gymnasium, which was built in 1950 and renovated in 1990. The building is named in honor of explorer and co-discoverer of the North Pole, Matthew Alexander Henson. He was the first human of African descent to have reached the North Pole. The university's bookstore and temporary library are housed in Henson Hall due to space constraints following Hurricane Katrina. Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... Matthew Henson in Arctic furs Matthew Henson (1866 – 1955) was an American explorer who may have been the first to reach the Geographic North Pole with Robert Peary in 1909. ...


Student Center and President's House

Kearny Hall Kearny Hall is the student center at Dillard University. It was built in 1935 and renovated in 1966 and 1996. This building is named in honor of New Orleanian Warren Kearny, Trustee of Dillard University. Kearny Hall is located at the center of the campus. In the building are a lounge area, Post Office, cafeteria, food service offices, as well as the Student Government Association office. 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ...


President's House Built in 1936, the president's residence has been renovated three times; 1964, 1972 and 1997. It has been home to six of the seven presidents of Dillard University. It was gutted in post-Katrina reconstruction and will be not be renovated until all other buildings on campus are restored at the request of President Marvalene Hughes, Ph.D.


List of Dillard People

Alumni

The following notable individuals are alumni of Dillard University:


Dr. William Banks '63 - Professor of African-American Studies at the University of California at Berkeley.


Harold Battiste, Jr.'51 - Accomplished jazz saxophonist, composer and arranger; musical director for Sonny & Cher, Dr. John and many others; arranger for Sam Cooke. Harold Raymond Battiste, Jr. ...


Dr. Samuel L. Biggers, Jr. '56 - Chief of Neurosurgery, King/Drew Medical Center, Los Angeles.


Cynthia M. A. Butler-McIntyre, D.D., M.Ed. '76 - National First Vice-President of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc.


Dr. Karen Drake '79 - Perinatologist, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines, Iowa; played a key role in the delivery of the Iowa septuplets -- November 19, 1997.


Lisa Frazier-Page '82 - Staff Writer, The Washington Post


Joseph N. Gayles, Jr. Ph.D. '58 - former President of Talladega College; former Morehouse School of Medicine Vice President for Development.


Mattelia B. Grays, Ed.D. '52 - 18th International President (1970-1974) of Alpha Kappa Alpha, Inc.


Sandra A. Harris-Hooker, Ph.D. '74 - Associate Dean of Research at Morehouse School of Medicine.


Dr. Francis C. Henderson '58 - Professor of Medicine and Special Assistant to the Director of the Jackson Heart Study -- Jackson, Mississippi.


Michael Jones, Esq. '82 - Attorney and partner, Kirkland and Ellis, LLP


Dr. Warren A. Jones '71 - Distiguished Professor of Health Policy; Executive Director, Mississippi Institute for Geographic Minority Health, University of Mississippi Medical Center; the first African American elected President of the American Academy of Family Physicians; and a member of the Dillard University Board of Trustees.


Harold Lundy, Sr. '71 - fourth President of Grambling State University.


Larry Lundy '72 - President of Lundy Enterprises, LLC (a Black Enterprise Top 100 Company).


Glenda Goodly McNeal, MBA '82 - Senior Vice President, American Express Company and a member of the Dillard University Board of Trustees.


Ellis M. Marsalis, Jr. '55 - accomplished jazz pianist and music educator; father of jazz artists: Branford, Wynton and Delfeayo; retired Director of Jazz Studies, University of New Orleans. Ellis Marsalis (born 1934, New Orleans, LA) is an American musician. ...


Frank J. Mason '71 - owner, FranGlo (McDonald's franchise owner)


Garrett Morris '58 -- comedian/actor (Saturday Night Live, The Jamie Foxx Show). Garrett Morris (born February 1, 1937) is an American comedian and actor from New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


The Honorable Revius O. Ortique '47 - the first African American to serve on the Louisiana State Supreme Court (now retired); a member of the Dillard University Board of Trustees.


Brenda Marie Osbey '78 - Poet Laureate for Louisiana.


Seandell K. Phillips '96 - the first Chief Financial Officer of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.


Joyce M. Roche, Ph.D. '70 - President & CEO of Girls, Inc.; former President and Chief Operating Officer of Carson, Inc.; the first female chairperson of the Dillard University Board of Trustees. Joyce M. Roche is President and Chief Executive Officer of Girls Incorporated (a national nonprofit research, education, and advocacy organization), New York, New York, and has served in this capacity since September 2000. ...


John Ruffin, Ph.D.'65 - the first associate director for Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institutes of Health.


Ruth J. Simmons, Ph.D. '67- the first African-American President of an Ivy League University (18th President of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island) and the first African-American President of a "Seven Sisters" school (ninth President of Smith College). Ruth J. Simmons (born 1945 in Grapeland, Texas), is the 18th president of Brown University and first black president of an Ivy League institution. ...


Mitchell W. Spellman, M.D., Ph.D. '40 - Founding Dean of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science; Professor of Surgery Emeritus of Harvard Medical School; director, Academic Alliances and International Exchange Programs at Harvard Medical International.


Dr. Rodrick A. Stevenson '81 - Director of the Organ Transplant Department, Meharry Medical College.


The Honorable Carl E. Stewart '71 - Judge, U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. Carl E. Stewart is an American Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. ...


William W. Sutton, Ph.D. '53- fourth President of Mississippi Valley State University.


Dr. Dwayne Thomas '80 - CEO, Medical Center of Louisiana, New Orleans.


Rev. Johnny Ray Youngblood '70 - Pastor, Saint Paul Community Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York.


Honorary Degree Recipients

The following notable individuals are honorary alumni of Dillard University:


Benjamin E. Mays - Doctor of Humane Letters (1975)


Albert W. Dent - Doctor of Humane Letters (1977)


Vernon E. Jordan, Jr. - Doctor of Laws (1977)


Coretta Scott King - Doctor of Humane Letters (1978)


Samuel D. Proctor - Doctor of Humane Letters (1978)


David Spitz - Doctor of Laws (1978)


John Hope Franklin - Doctor of Humane Letters (1979)


Howard Thurman - Doctor of Humane Letters (1979)


Robert Frederick Collins - Doctor of Laws (1979)


Lerone Bennett, Jr. - Doctor of Laws (1980)


Martin Luther King, Sr. - Doctor of Humane Letters (1980)


Rosa Freeman Keller - Doctor of Humane Letters (1980)


William Talbot Handy, Jr. - Doctor of Laws (1981)


Terry Sanford - Doctor of Humane Letters (1982)


Joseph N. W. Gayles, Jr. - Doctor of Laws (1983)


Mitchell W. Spellman - Doctor of Laws (1983)


Shirley A. Chisholm - Doctor of Humane Letters (1985)


Charles G. Adams - Doctor of Laws (1985)


Jerry H. Coleman - Doctor of Laws (1986)


Joseph E. Lowery - Doctor of Humane Letters (1986)


John L. Wilson - Doctor of Humane Letters (1986)


George Bush - Medal of Honor (1987)


Lou Rawls - Doctor of Humane Letters (1988)


Robert E. Johnson - Doctor of Literature (1988)


John Hurst Adams - Doctor of Laws (1989)


Marian Wright Edelman - Doctor of Humane Letters (1989)


Ellis Louis Marsalis, Jr. - Doctor of Music (1989)


Rhetaugh Graves Dumas - Doctor of Laws (1990)


Gardner Calvin Taylor - Doctor of Humane Letters (1990)


Spike Lee - Doctor of Humane Letters (2004)


Shirley Franklin - (2004)


William H. Cosby, Jr., Ed.D. - (2006)


Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y. - Doctor of Humane Letters (2007)


Roberta Flack - Doctor of Humane Letters (2007)


Frank Mason -- Doctor of Humane Letters (2007)


University Presidents

The following individuals currently or previously served as President of Dillard University:


9th Marvalene Hughes, Ph.D. (2005 - Present) Dr. Marvalene Hughes has been the president of Dillard University since 2005. ...


8th Bettye Parker Smith, Ph.D.


7th Michael Lucius Lomax, Ph.D. Dr. Michael Lomax is the president and chief executive officer of the United Negro College Fund, appointed in 2004. ...


6th Samuel DuBois Cook, Ph.D.


5th Myron Wicke


4th Broadus Nathaniel Butler


3rd Albert Walter Dent


2nd William Stuart Nelson


1st Rev. Will W. Alexander


Trustees

The following corporate, civic and religious leaders currently or previously served on the Dillard University Board of Trustees:


Herschel L. Abbott, Jr., Esq.


Jay Amestoy


Victoria Holloway Barbosa, M.D., M.P.H.


Edgar A. Bright, Jr.


Bruce K. Brown


Rudolph P. Byrd, Ph.D.


The Honorable Ruth C. Carter


Samuel DuBois Cook, Ph.D.


Bishop Finis A. Crutchfield


David B. Dillard


Arnold W. Donald


Marian Wright Edelman


Charles A. Ferguson


Joel L. Fleishman


Kent S. Foster


Robert W. French


Myron Gray


Michael G. Griffin '94


Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D.


Anthony J. Hackett, Jr.


Eben Hardie, Jr.


Wesley A. Hotchkiss


Marvalene Hughes, Ph.D.


Bishop William W. Hutchinson


Michael D. Jones, Esq. '82


Warren A. Jones, M.D. '71


Arthur Johnson


Robert E. Johnson


Lester E. Kabacoff


Pres Kabacoff


Charles Keller, Jr.


Rosa Freeman Keller


Charles Kohlmeyer, Jr.


Hugh A. Latimer


Frank J. Mason


Homer C. McEwen


Glenda Goodly McNeal, MBA '82


John Mendel


William R. Mendenhall


Deadrick C. Montague


R. King Milling


Steven Odell


Bishop William B. Oden


The Honorable Revius O. Ortique '47


Joyce M. Roche, Ph.D. '70


Howard E. Spragg


Edward M. Swan, Jr.


Harold W. Thatcher


Kenneth W. Thompson


F. Thomas Trotter


Margaret F. Washington, RN


Henry M. Williams


Andrew B. Wisdom


Ambassador Andrew J. Young, Jr.


Hurricane Katrina

The campus, not far from the lower levee breach of the London Avenue Canal, suffered extensive flood damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Nelson Hall was destroyed by a fire. A levee, levée (from the feminine past participle of the French verb lever, to raise), floodbank or stopbank is a natural or artificial slope or wall, usually earthen and often parallels the course of a river. ... The London Avenue Canal in New Orleans, Louisiana does not connect Lake Pontchartrain to the Mississippi River. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


In spring 2006, the students of Dillard University took their normal classes at The New Orleans World Trade Center and The New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel.


As is tradition, Dillard held graduation on the Rosa Freeman Keller Avenue of the Oaks in July 2006. They returned to campus in September of 2006, and continue getting the campus back in order.


[4]. A bus fire also destroyed belongings of 37 students who were in the process of being evacuated. [5] [6]


External links

  • Dillard University - official website

Footnotes

In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, also known as Alabama A&M University or AAMU, is an accredited public, coeducational land grant college located in Normal, Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama. ... Alabama State Hornets logo Alabama State University, founded 1867, is a historically black university located in Montgomery, Alabama. ... Founded in 1903, Albany State University is a historically black , four year institution located in Albany, GA, a progressive city with a metropolitan statistical area population of 162,800. ... Alcorn State University, located near Lorman, Mississippi, United States, is a public land grant university. ... Allen University was founded in 1870 as Payne Institute, dedicated to providing education to freed African-American slaves. ... Arkansas Baptist College (ABC) is a historically black college (HBCU) located in Little Rock, Arkansas. ... University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, is a historically black university located in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. ... Benedict College is an historically African-American liberal arts college located in Columbia, South Carolina. ... Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina is one of two remaining African American womens colleges in the United States. ... Bethune-Cookman University or simply BCC (as it was formerly called) or BCU (as it is called as of Feb. ... Bishop College was a historically black college located first in Marshall, Texas and later Dallas, Texas. ... Bluefield State College is an historically black college located in Bluefield, West Virginia. ... Bowie State University (Bowie State), located on 338½ acres (1. ... Central State University is a historically black university located in Wilberforce, Ohio. ... Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, located in Cheyney, Pennsylvania was originally founded as the Institute for Colored Youth in 1837 by Richard Humphreys. ... Claflin University is located in Orangeburg, South Carolina. ... Clark Atlanta University (CAU) is a private institution of higher education in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Concordia College, Selma is a college of the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod located in Selma, Alabama, in the United States. ... Coppin State University, located on 46 acres (186,000 m²) in Baltimore, Maryland, is part of the University System of Maryland. ... Desudesudesudesudesu (formerly Delaware State College) is a historically black university in Dover, Delaware. ... History Edward Waters College is a private, historically black college whose future is lined with pride, growth and success. ... Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) is an institution of higher learning located in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in the United States. ... Fayetteville State University is a four-year university located in Fayetteville, North Carolina. ... {{THESE FOOLS GOT OWNED Hermosa, Herman and Jefferson Sts. ... Name Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Address Town Tallahassee, FL 32307 Established 1887 Community Type Public coeducational Classification Historically black Agricultural and mechanical Religion Secular Enrollment Faculty President Dr. Castell V. Bryant Accreditation Nickname Rattlers Mascot Rattler Colors Orange and light green Motto Head, heart, hand, field Newspaper The Famuan... Florida Memorial University is a historically black college in Miami, Florida. ... Fort Valley State University (FVSU) is a historically black college and university (HBCU) located in Fort Valley, Georgia. ... Grambling redirects here. ... Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) is an American University located in Hampton, Virginia. ... Harris-Stowe State University is a Missouri public university located in midtown St. ... The main campus of Hinds Community College is located in Raymond, Mississippi, about five miles west of Jackson, Mississippi, the state capital. ... Howard University (HU) is a private, coeducational, nonsectarian university located in Washington, D.C., United States. ... Huston-Tillotson University is a historically black university in Austin, Texas. ... The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) is a Christian, an independent, non-profit, coeducational ecumenical, graduate professional school of theology. ... Jackson State University, often abridged as Jackson State or by its initials JSU is a historically black university located in Jackson, Mississippi founded in 1877. ... Jarvis Christian College is an independent four year, historically black, college affiliated with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU) is a private, co-ed, four-year liberal arts institution of higher learning located in the heart of Charlotte, North Carolina; it is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church. ... Kentucky State logo Kentucky State University (KSU, or less commonly, KYSU, to differentiate from Kansas State University) is a four-year institution of higher learning, located in Frankfort, Kentucky, the states capital. ... Knoxville College is a historically black college in Knoxville, Tennessee, founded in 1875 by the United Presbyterian Church of North America. ... Lane College is a four-year, accredited historically black college located in Jackson, Tennessee, just east of the downtown area. ... Langston University is in Langston, Oklahoma. ... LeMoyne-Owen College is an accredited, four-year historically black college which has operated continuously in Memphis, Tennessee since 1873. ... Lewis College of Business is the first historically African American college in Michigan. ... Lincoln University of Missouri is located in Jefferson City. ... Lincoln University in Pennsylvania is a four-year University located on 350 acres in southern Chester County. ... Livingstone College is a private, historically black, four-year college in Salisbury, North Carolina. ... University of Maryland Eastern Shore, located on 620 acres (2. ... Meharry Medical College was founded in 1876 in Nashville, Tennessee to provide health sciences education. ... Miles College is a Historically Black College (HBCU) founded in 1905. ... Mississippi Valley State University is a historically black university located in Itta Bena, Mississippi. ... Morehouse College is a private, four-year, all-male, historically black liberal arts college in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Morehouse School of Medicine is a medical school in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Originally part of African-American all-male Morehouse College, it was founded in 1975 during the tenure of college president Hugh M. Gloster as a two year program in the basic sciences called The School of Medicine at... Morgan State University, formerly Centenary Biblical Institute (1867-1890), Morgan College (1890 -1975), is located in residential Baltimore, Maryland. ... Morris Brown College (MBC) is a four-year, private, coed, liberal arts institution affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal Church. ... Morris College is a four-year coeducational, liberal arts, private HBCU (Historically Black College & University) operated under the Baptist Educational and Missionary Convention in South Carolina. ... Mount Hermon Female Seminary was an historically black institution of higher education for women in Clinton, Mississippi. ... Norfolk State University (NSU) is a four-year, state-supported, coed, liberal arts institution, founded in 1935 as the Norfolk State Unit of Virginia Union University (VUU). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... North Carolina Central University (NCCU) is a historically black college located in Durham, North Carolina. ... Paine College is a private Historically Black college located in Augusta, Georgia. ... Paul Quinn College is the oldest African-American liberal arts college in Texas. ... Philander Smith College is a private, historically black college that is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... Prairie View A&M University is a historically black university located in Prairie View, Texas and is a member of the Texas A&M University System. ... Rust College is a historically black liberal arts college located in Holly Springs, Mississippi, approximately 35 miles southeast of Memphis, Tennessee. ... Saint Pauls College is a private, historically black college in Lawrenceville, Virginia, USA. Saint Paul’s College is a four-year, private, coed, liberal arts institute affiliated with the Episcopal Church. ... Savannah State University is a four-year, state-supported, historically black university located in Savannah, Georgia. ... Selma University is a private liberal arts institution in Selma, Alabama, affiliated with the Alabama State Missionary Baptist Convention. ... Shaw University is a nationally accredited historically black college (HBCU) located in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. Recently it won a 5-year grant with University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill to create a Partnership for the Elimination of Health Disparities for minorities, which adds to its research capacity. ... Shelton State Community College is a community college in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... South Carolina State University (also known as SCSU, State College among the older alumni members, or simply State), is a historically black university located in Orangeburg, South Carolina. ... For other Southern University campuses, see Southern University System. ... The Southern University at New Orleans is a University in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Southern University at Shreveport Homepage ... Southwestern Christian College (SwCC) is an historically black college in Terrell, Texas operated by the Churches of Christ, making it the sole extant institution of its kind. ... Spelman College is a four-year liberal arts womans college in Atlanta, Georgia. ... For other schools/colleges of the same name, see St. ... Stillman College (not to be confused with the fictional:Hillman College that was the alma mater of Dr. Cliff Huxtable, the lead character on The Cosby Show) is a historically black liberal arts college founded in 1876 and located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. ... Storer College postcard (1910) Storer College was an historically black college located in Harpers Ferry in Jefferson County, West Virginia. ... Straight University Buildings Straight University was founded in 1868 by the American Missionary Association. ... Talladega College is Alabamas oldest private, historically black, liberal arts college. ... Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. ... Texas College is a historically black four-year college located in Tyler, Texas that is affiliated with the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church and the United Negro College Fund. ... Texas Southern University is one of the largest historically black universities in the USA. Located in Houston, Texas, the university was established on March 3, 1947 by the Texas Legislature and it was initially named Texas State University for Negroes. ... {{Infobox University |name = Tougaloo College |image = |caption = |motto =Where History Meets the Future |tagline = |established = 1869 |type =[[Private College |affiliation =United Church of Christ |endowment =$8 million |staff = |faculty =108 |president =Dr. Beverly Wade Hogan |students = |undergrad =913 (in 2006-2007) |city = Tougaloo |state = Mississippi |country = USA |campus = suburban, 500... Tuskegee University is a private university located in Tuskegee, Alabama and is a member school of the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund. ... The University of the District of Columbia (also known as UDC) is a public university located in Washington, DC. The university was formed in 1977 through the amalgamation of the Federal City College and Washington Technical Institute - which had both been established in 1966 as the result of a study... The University of the Virgin Islands (or UVI) is a university with campuses on St. ... Virginia State University is an historically black university located in Ettrick, Virginia (near Petersburg, in the Richmond area), and was founded on March 6, 1882. ... Virginia Union University (VUU) is a historically black university located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Virginia University of Lynchburg is a private, historically black university located in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... West Virginia State University is a historically black (though now over 90 percent white) public college in Institute, West Virginia, an unincorporated suburb of Charleston, West Virginia. ... Wilberforce University is a private, coed, liberal arts historically African-American university located in Wilberforce, Ohio, that is affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church and participates in the United Negro College Fund. ... Wiley College is one of the first and oldest historically black college west of the Mississippi River and is located on the west side of Marshall, Texas. ... Winston-Salem State University is a four-year is a public, coeducational, research university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically African-American Roman Catholic University located off Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Gulf Coast Athletic Conference (GCAC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NAIA. Member institutions are located in Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi. ... Belhaven College is a college in Jackson, Mississippi that was founded by the Presbyterian Church (USA) but that is independently run by a Board of Trustees. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Louisiana State University of Shreveport (or LSUS) is a branch of the Louisiana State University System in Shreveport, Louisiana. ... The Southern University at New Orleans is a University in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... For the former Mansfield College (University of Oxford), see Spring Hill College, Birmingham. ... {{Infobox University |name = Tougaloo College |image = |caption = |motto =Where History Meets the Future |tagline = |established = 1869 |type =[[Private College |affiliation =United Church of Christ |endowment =$8 million |staff = |faculty =108 |president =Dr. Beverly Wade Hogan |students = |undergrad =913 (in 2006-2007) |city = Tougaloo |state = Mississippi |country = USA |campus = suburban, 500... The University of Mobile is an American four-year, private, Christian university in Prichard, Alabama, an industrial suburb of Mobile. ... William Carey University is a university in southern Mississippi, in the United States affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention and the Mississippi Baptist Convention. ... Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically African-American Roman Catholic University located off Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City New Orleans, Louisiana. ...

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