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Encyclopedia > Digastric muscle
Digastric muscle
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Latin Digastricus
Gray's subject #111
Origin: medial aspect of the mastoid process and the digastric groove
Insertion:
Blood:
Nerve: anterior belly is innervated by the mandibular division of the trigeminal (CN V3) via the mylohyoid nerve; the posterior belly by the facial nerve (CN VII)
Action: Opens the jaw when the masseter and the temporarlis are relaxed.
Antagonist: {{{Antagonist}}}
MeSH {{{MeshNumber}}}


The digastric muscle (named digastric as it has two bellies) is a small muscle located under the jaw. The two bellies are separated by an intermediate tendon, which runs through a sling on the side of the hyoid bone. Image File history File links Gray386. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones, though a small portion of the human population have an extra bone, occurring in the form of an extra rib. ... The mastoid process (or mastoid bone) is a conical bump of the posterior portion of the temporal bone that is situated behind the ear in humans and many other vertebrates and serves as a site of neck muscle attachment (the Sternocleidomastoid, Splenius capitis, and Longissimus capitis). ... A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones, though a small portion of the human population have an extra bone, occurring in the form of an extra rib. ... List of human nerves External links List of nerves This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness. ... The trigeminal nerve is the fifth (V) cranial nerve, and carries sensory information from most of the face, as well as motor supply to the muscles of mastication (the muscles enabling chewing), tensor tympani (in the middle ear), and other muscles in the floor of the mouth, such as the... The mylohyoid nerve is derived from the inferior alveolar just before it enters the mandibular foramen. ... The facial nerve is seventh of twelve paired cranial nerves. ... In human anatomy, the masseter is one of the muscles of mastication. ... An antagonist is a kind of muscle that act in opposition to the movement generated by the agonists and are responsible for returning a limb to its initial position. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... A top-down view of skeletal muscle Muscle is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. ... The jaw is either of the two opposable structures forming, or near the entrance to, the mouth. ... A tendon (or sinew) is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue that connects muscle to bone. ... The hyoid bone (Os Hyoideum; Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, not articulated to any other bone; it is supported by the muscles of the neck and in turn supports the root of the tongue. ...


The posterior belly arises on the inferior surface of the skull, from the medial surface of the mastoid process of the temporal bone and a deep groove between the mastoid process and the styloid process called the digastric groove. The anterior belly is attached to the front of the mandible. The mastoid process (or mastoid bone) is a conical bump of the posterior portion of the temporal bone that is situated behind the ear in humans and many other vertebrates and serves as a site of neck muscle attachment (the Sternocleidomastoid, Splenius capitis, and Longissimus capitis). ... The temporal bones (os temporales) are situated at the sides and base of the skull. ... The mandible (inferior maxillary bone) (together with the maxilla) is the largest and strongest bone of the face. ...


The two bellies of the digastric muscle have different embryological origin, and are supplied by different cranial nerves. The posterior belly is supplied by a branch of the facial nerve, and the anterior body supplied by the trigeminal via the mylohyoid nerve. Embryology is the branch of developmental biology that studies embryos and their development. ... Cranial nerves are nerves which start directly from the brainstem instead of the spinal cord. ... The facial nerve is seventh of twelve paired cranial nerves. ... The trigeminal nerve is the fifth (V) cranial nerve, and carries sensory information from most of the face, as well as motor supply to the muscles of mastication (the muscles enabling chewing), tensor tympani (in the middle ear) and other muscles in the floor of the mouth, such as the... The mylohyoid nerve is derived from the inferior alveolar just before it enters the mandibular foramen. ...


When the digastric muscle contracts, it acts to elevate the hyoid bone. If the hyoid is being held in place (by the infrahyoid muscles), it will tend to depress the mandible (open the mouth). The hyoid bone (Os Hyoideum; Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, not articulated to any other bone; it is supported by the muscles of the neck and in turn supports the root of the tongue. ... The term infrahyoid refers to the region below (inferior) to the hyoid bone in the neck. ... The mandible (inferior maxillary bone) (together with the maxilla) is the largest and strongest bone of the face. ...


The Digastricus (Digastric muscle) consists of two fleshy bellies united by an intermediate rounded tendon.


It lies below the body of the mandible, and extends, in a curved form, from the mastoid process to the symphysis menti. The mandible (inferior maxillary bone) (together with the maxilla) is the largest and strongest bone of the face. ... The external surface of the mandible is marked in the median line by a faint ridge, indicating the Symphysis menti or line of junction of the two pieces of which the bone is composed at an early period of life. ...


The posterior belly, longer than the anterior, arises from the mastoid notch of the temporal bone and passes downward and forward.


The anterior belly arises from a depression on the inner side of the lower border of the mandible, close to the symphysis, and passes downward and backward.


The two bellies end in an intermediate tendon which perforates the Stylohyoideus muscle, and is held in connection with the side of the body and the greater cornu of the hyoid bone by a fibrous loop, which is sometimes lined by a mucous sheath.


A broad aponeurotic layer is given off from the tendon of the Digastricus on either side, to be attached to the body and greater cornu of the hyoid bone; this is termed the suprahyoid aponeurosis. The hyoid bone (Os Hyoideum; Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, not articulated to any other bone; it is supported by the muscles of the neck and in turn supports the root of the tongue. ...


Variations

Variations are numerous. The posterior belly may arise partly or entirely from the styloid process, or be connected by a slip to the middle or inferior constrictor; the anterior belly may be double or extra slips from this belly may pass to the jaw or Mylohyoideus or decussate with a similar slip on opposite side; anterior belly may be absent and posterior belly inserted into the middle of the jaw or hyoid bone. The tendon may pass in front, more rarely behind the Stylohoideus. The Mentohyoideus muscle passes from the body of hyoid bone to chin.


Triangles

The Digastricus divides the anterior triangle of the neck into three smaller triangle

  • (1) the submaxillary triangle, bounded above by the lower border of the body of the mandible, and a line drawn from its angle to the Sternocleidomastoideus, below by the posterior belly of the Digastricus and the Stylohyoideus, in front by the anterior belly of the Diagastricus;
  • (2) the carotid triangle, bounded above by the posterior belly of the Digastricus and Stylohyoideus, behind by the Sternocleidomastoideus, below by the Omohyoideus;
  • (3) the suprahyoid or submental triangle, bounded laterally by the anterior belly of the Digastricus, medially by the middle line of the neck from the hyoid bone to the symphysis menti, and inferiorly by the body of the hyoid bone.

In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid muscles are muscles in the neck that act to flex and rotate the head. ...

External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.
GPnotebook is a British medical database for general practitioners (GPs. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...

Muscles of the Head -- Neck -- Trunk -- Upper limb -- Lower limb -- LIST OF ALL MUSCLES
SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL: platysma | (Gray's s110)

LATERAL CERVICAL: sternocleidomastoid | (Gray's s111) A top-down view of skeletal muscle Muscle is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. ... This is a list of muscles of the human anatomy. ... The platysma is a superficial muscle that stretches from the clavicle to the mandible overlapping the sternocleidomastoid. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ... In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid muscles are muscles in the neck that act to flex and rotate the head. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


SUPRAHYOID: digastric | stylohyoid | mylohyoid | geniohyoid - INFRAHYOID: sternohyoid | sternothyroid | thyrohyoid | omohyoid | (Gray's s112) The term suprahyoid refers to the region above (superior) to the hyoid bone in the neck. ... The Stylohyoid muscle is a slender muscle, lying in front of, and above the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. ... The Mylohyoid muscle, flat and triangular, is situated immediately above the anterior belly of the Digastricus, and forms, with its fellow of the opposite side, a muscular floor for the cavity of the mouth. ... The Geniohyoideus (Geniohyoid muscle) is a narrow muscle, situated above the medial border of the Mylohyoideus. ... The term infrahyoid refers to the region below(inferior) to the hyoid bone in the neck. ... The Sternohyoid muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The Sternothyroid muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The Thyrohyoid muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The omohyoid muscle is a muscle at the front of the neck that consists of two bellies separated by an intermediate tendon. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


VERTEBRAL -- ANTERIOR: longus colli | longus capitis | rectus capitis anterior | rectus capitis lateralis (Gray's s113) The Longus colli muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The Longus capitis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Rectus capitis lateralis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


LATERAL: scalenus anterior | scalenus medius | scalenus posterior | (Gray's s114) The scalene muscles are a group of three pairs of muscles in the lateral neck, namely the anterior scalene, middle scalene, and posterior scalene. ... The scalene muscles are a group of three pairs of muscles in the lateral neck, namely the anterior scalene, middle scalene, and posterior scalene. ... The scalene muscles are a group of three pairs of muscles in the lateral neck, namely the anterior scalene, middle scalene, and posterior scalene. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Barrow Quarterly Article 18-2-1 (5691 words)
Upward retraction of the digastric muscle exposes the distal portion of the cervical segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA).
Below the digastric muscle at the level of the common carotid artery bifurcation, the ICA is crossed by the hypoglossal nerve, the ansa cervicalis, and the lingual and facial veins (Fig.
Medial to the digastric muscle, the ICA is crossed by the stylohyoid muscle and the occipital and posterior auricular arteries.
Stylohyoid muscle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (334 words)
The Stylohyoid muscle is a slender muscle, lying in front of, and above the posterior belly of the digastric muscle.
It is perforated, near its insertion, by the tendon of the digastric muscle.
The Stylohyoideus (Stylohyoid muscle) is a slender muscle, lying in front of, and above the posterior belly of the Digastricus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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