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Encyclopedia > Digamma
Greek alphabet
Α α Alpha Β β Beta
Γ γ Gamma Δ δ Delta
Ε ε Epsilon Ζ ζ Zeta
Η η Eta Θ θ Theta
Ι ι Iota Κ κ Kappa
Λ λ Lambda Μ μ Mu
Ν ν Nu Ξ ξ Xi
Ο ο Omicron Π π Pi
Ρ ρ Rho Σ σ Ϲ ϲ Sigma
Τ τ Tau Υ υ Upsilon
Φ φ Phi Χ χ Chi
Ψ ψ Psi Ω ω Omega
obsolete letters
Ϝ ϝ Digamma Ϻ ϻ San
Ϙ ϙ Ϟ ϟ Qoppa Ϡ ϡ Sampi
Ϛ ϛ Stigma Ϸ ϸ Sho
This article is about the Greek letter. For the mathematical function, see digamma function.

Digamma (upper case Ϝ, lower case ϝ) is an archaic letter of the Greek alphabet, used primarily as a Greek numeral. Image File history File links Greek_alphabet_digamma2. ... Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... Alpha (uppercase Α, lowercase α) is the first letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Beta (upper case Î’, lower case β) is the second letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Gamma (uppercase Γ, lowercase γ) is the third letter of the Greek alphabet. ... For other uses, see Delta. ... For the 2005 hurricane, see Hurricane Epsilon. ... Zeta (upper case Ζ, lower case ζ) is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet. ... For other uses, see Eta. ... Theta (upper case Θ, lower case θ or ) is the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet. ... For programming language, see Iota and Jot. ... Kappa can stand for: Κ or κ, the 10th letter of the Greek alphabet: see Kappa (letter). ... Lambda (upper case Λ, lower case λ) is the 11th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... For other uses, see Mu. ... For other uses, see Nu. ... Xi (upper case Ξ, lower case ξ) is the 14th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Omicron (upper case Ο, lower case ο, literally small o) is the 15th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... For other uses, see Pi (disambiguation) Pi (upper case Π, lower case Ï€) is the 16th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Rho (upper case Ρ, lower case ρ) is the 17th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... For other uses, see Sigma (disambiguation). ... Tau (upper case Τ, lower case Ï„) is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Upsilon (upper case , lower case ) is the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Phi (upper case Φ, lower case φ or ) is the 21st letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Chi (upper case Χ, lower case χ) is the 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... San (uppercase , lowercase ) was a letter of the Greek alphabet, appearing between Pi and Qoppa in alphabetical order, corresponding in position although not in name to the Phoenician tsade. ... Qoppa Qoppa is an obsolete letter of the Greek alphabet and has a numeric value of 90. ... Sampi (Upper case Ϡ, lower case ϡ) is an obsolete letter of the Greek alphabet and has a numeric value of 900. ... Stigma is a ligature of the Greek letters sigma and tau, sometimes used nowadays to represent the Greek numeral 6. ... Sho (uppercase , lowercase ) was a letter added to the Greek alphabet in order to write the Bactrian language. ... In mathematics, the digamma function is defined as the logarithmic derivative of the gamma function: It is the first of the polygamma functions. ... Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... Greek numerals are a system of representing numbers using letters of the Greek alphabet. ...


The letter had the phonetic value of a Voiced labial-velar approximant /w/. Its original name is unknown, but was probably Ϝαυ (wau). It was later called 'digamma' (double gamma) because of its shape. It is attested in archaic and dialectal ancient Greek inscriptions, and is occasionally used as a symbol in later Greek mathematical texts. The voiced labiovelar (actually labialized velar) approximant is a type of consonantal sound, used in certain spoken languages. ... Gamma (upper case Γ, lower case γ) is the 3rd letter of the Greek alphabet. ... The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA // – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... Inscriptions are words or letters written, engraved, painted, or otherwise traced on a surface and can appear in contexts both small and monumental. ...


It is also used as the Greek numeral 6. In ancient usage, the numeral had the same form as the letter digamma. However, in medieval and modern usage, the numeral has normally been written in the graphic form of a stigma (Ϛ, ϛ), which historically is completely distinct from digamma; it is a medieval ligature of sigma and tau. To complete the confusion, in modern times, the sequence στ or ΣΤ is sometimes used instead of the stigma symbol. Greek numerals are a system of representing numbers using letters of the Greek alphabet. ... Stigma is a ligature of the Greek letters sigma and tau, sometimes used nowadays to represent the Greek numeral 6. ... In writing and typography, a ligature occurs where two or more letterforms are written or printed as a unit. ... Sigma (upper case Σ, lower case σ, alternative ς) is the 18th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Tau (upper case Τ, lower case τ) is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet. ...


Digamma, like Y, derives from the Phoenician letter Waw, and in its turn gave rise to the Roman letter F. Upsilon (upper case , lower case ) is the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... The Phoenician alphabet dates from around 1400 BC and is related to the Proto-Canaanite alphabet. ...   Vav or waw is the sixth letter of many Semitic alphabets, including Phoenician, Hebrew, Aramaic, and Arabic in abjadi order; it is the twenty-seventh in modern Arabic order. ... ... Are you looking for the article on the F Sharp programming language? You may have made your way to this page due to technical limitations in Wikipedia. ...


The sound /w/ in Greek

The sound /w/ existed in Mycenean Greek, as attested in Linear B and archaic Greek inscriptions using digamma. It is also confirmed by the Hittite name of Troy, Wilusa, corresponding to the Greek name *Wilios. The sound was lost at various times in various dialects, mostly before the classical period. Linear B script sample Linear B is a script that was used for writing Mycenaean, an early form of Greek. ... The Hittite language is the dead language once spoken by the Hittites, a people who once created an empire centered on ancient Hattusa (modern Boğazköy) in north-central Anatolia (modern Turkey). ... Walls of the excavated city of Troy Troy (Ancient Greek Τροία Troia, also Ίλιον; Latin: Troia, Ilium) is a legendary city, center of the Trojan War, described in the Trojan War cycle, especially in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. ...


In Ionic, [w] had probably disappeared before Homer's epics were written down (7th century BC), but its former presence can be detected in many cases because its omission left the meter defective. An example is the word ἄναξ (king) found in the Iliad, which would originally have been [wanaks]. Also οἶνος (wine) was used in the meter where a word starting with a consonant would be expected. Further evidence coupled with cognate-analysis shows that οἶνος was earlier [woinos] (cf. Latin vinum and English "wine"). For some time, word-initial /w-/ remained foreign to Greek phonology, and was dropped in loanwords, compare the name of Italy (Italia from Oscan Viteliu) or of the Veneti (Greek Enetoi). By the 2nd century BC, the phoneme was once again registered, compare for example the spelling of ουατεις for vates. Some dialects never dropped digamma at all, and there are some surviving traces in Tsakonian even today. Ionic Greek was a sub-dialect of the Attic-Ionic dialectal group of Ancient Greek (see Greek dialects). ... The Homère Caetani bust at the Louvre, a 2nd century Roman copy of a 2nd century BC Greek original. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 7th century BC started on January 1, 700 BC and ended on December 31, 601 BC. // Overview Events Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria who created the the first systematically collected library at Nineveh A 16th century depiction of the Hanging Gardens of... Meter (British English spelling: metre) describes the linguistic sound patterns of a verse. ... The Iliad (Ancient Greek Ιλιάς, Ilias) is, along with the Odyssey, one of the two major Greek epic poems traditionally attributed to Homer, a supposedly blind Ionian poet. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Oscan, the language of the Osci, is in the Sabellic branch of the Italic language family, which is a branch of Indo-European and includes Umbrian, Latin and Faliscan. ... Veneti may mean: The Adriatic Veneti, Enetoi in Greek, a bygone people of north-eastern Italy who spoke an Italic language. ... (3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) // Events 175 BCE - Antiochus IV Epiphanes, took possession of the Syrian throne, at the murder of his brother Seleucus IV Philopator, which rightly belonged to his nephew Demetrius I Soter. ... Vates - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Tsakonian (also Tsakonic) (Standard Greek Τσακωνική Διάλεκτος — Tsakonic language — is a dialect of, or language closely related to, Standard Modern Greek, spoken in the Tsakonian region of the Peloponnese, Greece. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Digamma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (407 words)
Digamma (upper case Ϝ, lower case ϝ) is an archaic letter of the Greek alphabet, used primarily as a Greek numeral.
It is attested in archaic and dialectal ancient Greek inscriptions, and is occasionally used as a symbol in later Greek mathematical texts.
Digamma, like Y, derives from the Phoenician letter Waw, and in its turn gave rise to the Roman letter F.
Digamma - definition of Digamma in Encyclopedia (228 words)
Digamma, or Wau, (upper case Ϝ, lower case ϝ) is an obsolete letter of the Greek alphabet.
When used as a numeral, digamma is written using the stigma (Ϛ, ϛ;), a ligature of sigma and tau.
In Ionic it had probably disappeared before Homer's epics were written down (7th century BC), but the former presence of a digamma can be detected in many cases because its omission left the meter defective.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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