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Encyclopedia > Dickinson W. Richards

Dr. Dickinson Woodruff Richards Jr (October 30, 1895 - February 23, 1973) was an American physician and physiologist. He was a co-reciepient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1956 with André F. Cournand and Werner Forssmann for the development of cardiac catheterization and characterisation of a number of cardiac diseases. October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... The word physician should not be confused with physicist, which means a scientist in the area of physics. ... Physiology (in Greek physis = nature and logos = word) is the study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of living organisms. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... 1956 is a leap year starting on Sunday. ... Werner Forssmann, a former physician from Eberswald, Germany, used a catheter as it had never been used before. ... Catheter disassembled In medicine, a catheter is a tube that a health professional may insert into part of the body. ... Coronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease (CAD) and atherosclerotic heart disease, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the arteries that supply the myocardium (the muscle of the heart). ...


Richards was born in Orange, New Jersey, he was educated at the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut, and entered Yale University in 1913. At Yale he studied English and Greek, graduating with an A.B degree in 1917. He also joined the United States Army in 1917, when he had completed his studies he became an artillery instructor and he served 1918 - 1919 as an artillery officer in France. Orange is a township located in Essex County, New Jersey. ... The Hotchkiss School is a private, coeducational preparatory school in Lakeville, Connecticut, USA. It was founded in 1891 by Maria Bissell Hotchkiss with the encouragement of President Timothy Dwight V of Yale. ... State nickname: The Constitution State Other U.S. States Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Governor M. Jodi Rell Official languages English Area 14,371 km² (48th)  - Land 12,559 km²  - Water 1,809 km² (12. ... This article is about the institution of higher learning in the United States. ... 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Historically, artillery refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The French Republic or France (French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. ...


When he returned to the United States, Richards attended Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, graduating with an M.A. in 1922 and his M.D. degree in 1923. He was on the staff of the Presbyterian Hospital, New York until 1927, when he went to England to work at the National Institute for Medical Research, London, under Sir Henry Dale, control of circulation in the liver. The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Columbia University is a large private research university in New York City comprising, through its affiliates, five undergraduate colleges and sixteen graduate and professional schools. ... 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ... 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Events January 7 - First transatlantic telephone call - New York City to London January 9 - Military rebellion crushed in Lisbon January 14 - Paul Doumer elected president of France January 19 - Britain sends troops to China February 12 - First British troops lad on Shanghai February 14 - Earthquake in Yugoslavia - 700 dead February... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Sir Henry Hallett Dale (June 9, 1875 - July 23, 1968) was an English scientist. ... The liver is an organ in vertebrates including humans. ...


In 1928 Richards returned to the Presbyterian Hospital and began his research on pulmonary and circulatory physiology, working under Professor Lawrence Joseph Henderson of Harvard. He began collaborations with André Cournand at Bellevue Hostital, New York, working on pulmonary function. Initially their research focussed on methods to sutdy pulmonary function in patients with pulmonary disease. 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Their next area of research was the development of a technique for catheterization of the heart. Using this technique they were able to study and characterise traumatic shock, the physiology of heart failure, they could measure of the actions of cardiac drugs, and various forms of dysfunction in chronic cardiac and pulmonary diseases and their treatment, and develop techniques for the diagnosis of congenital heart diseases. For this work he, André Cournand and Werner Forssmann, were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for 1956. Congestive heart failure (CHF) (also called Congestive Cardiac Failure and heart failure) is the inability of the heart to pump a sufficient amount of blood throughout the body, or requiring elevated filling pressures in order to pump effectively. ... Congenital heart disease is heart disease in the newborn, and includes congenital heart defects, congenital arrythmias, and cardiomyopathies. ...


In 1945 Richards moved his lab to Bellevue Hospital, New York, in 1947 he was made the Lambert Professor of Medicine at Columbia University. During his Career he also served as an advisor to Merck, Sharp and Dohme Company, he edited the Merck Manual. Richards retired from his positions at Bellevue and Columbia in 1961. 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Do you mean: Merck KGaA, the German pharmaceutical company; Merck & Co. ... The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy (often referred to simply as The Merck Manual) is one of the worlds most widely used medical textbooks. ...


Richards received many other honors, including the John Phillips Memorial Award of the American College of Physicians in 1960, the Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur in 1963, the Trudeau Medal in 1968, and the Kober Medal of the Association of American Physicians in 1970. The American College of Physicians (ACP) is the largest medical specialty society in the United States of America with over 115,000 members. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Events January-February January 11 - The Whisky A Go-Go night club in Los Angeles, the first disco in the USA, is opened. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


He passed away in Lakeville, Connecticut.


Reference

  • Fishman, Alfred P. Richards, Dickinson Woodruff. American National Biography Online Feb. 2000.
  • Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1942-1962, Dickinson W. Richards (http://nobelprize.org/medicine/laureates/1956/richards-bio.html), Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1964

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cournand, Andre Frederic. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (153 words)
He was associated with the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia Univ. after 1935, and became a full professor in 1951.
He shared with Werner Forssmann and Dickinson W. Richards the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for work in developing cardiac catheterization.
This technique, whereby a catheter is inserted through a vein into the heart, facilitates study of both the diseased and healthy heart and often aids in determining the advisability of heart surgery.
Dickinson W. Richards - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (481 words)
He was a co-reciepient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1956 with André Cournand and Werner Forssmann for the development of cardiac catheterization and characterisation of a number of cardiac diseases.
Richards was born in Orange, New Jersey, he was educated at the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut, and entered Yale University in 1913.
Richards received many other honors, including the John Phillips Memorial Award of the American College of Physicians in 1960, the Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur in 1963, the Trudeau Medal in 1968, and the Kober Medal of the Association of American Physicians in 1970.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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