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Encyclopedia > Dickensian
Charles Dickens used his rich imagination, sense of humour and detailed memories, particularly of his childhood, to enliven his fiction.
Charles Dickens used his rich imagination, sense of humour and detailed memories, particularly of his childhood, to enliven his fiction.

Charles John Huffam Dickens (February 7, 1812June 9, 1870), pen-nameBoz”, was a cherished English novelist of the Victorian era. The popularity of his novels and short stories during his lifetime and to the present is demonstrated by the fact that none of his novels has ever gone out of print. Public domain image from http://www. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... Boz was an early pen name of Charles Dickens, and the name under which he published his first work, Sketches by Boz. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, June 20, 1837) gave her name to the historic era. ...

Contents


Childhood

Dicken was born in Portsmouth, England, to John Dickens, a naval pay clerk, and his wife Elizabeth Barrow. When he was five, the family moved to Chatham, Kent. When he was ten, the family relocated to Camden Town in London. This article is about the English city of Portsmouth. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... Location within the British Isles. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... Camden Town is a place in the London Borough of Camden. ...


His early years were an idyllic time for him. He described himself then as a “very small and not-over-particularly-taken-care-of boy”. He spent his time in the out-doors, reading voraciously with a particular fondness for the picaresque novels of Tobias Smollett and Henry Fielding. He talked later in life of his extremely strong memories of childhood and his continuing photographic memory of people and events that helped bring his fiction to life. The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresco, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular style of novel that originated in Spain and flourished in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries and has continued to influence modern literature. ... Tobias Smollett Tobias George Smollett (March 19, 1721 - September 17, 1771) was a Scottish author, best known for his picaresque novels, such as Roderick Random and Peregrine Pickle. ... Henry Fielding (April 22, 1707 - October 8, 1754) was a British novelist and dramatist. ... Photographic memory or eidetic memory is the ability to recall images, sounds, or objects in memory with great accuracy and in seemingly unlimited volume. ...


His family was moderately well off and he received some education at a private school but all that changed when his father, after spending too much money entertaining and retaining his social position, was imprisoned for debt. At the age of twelve Dickens was deemed old enough to work and began working for 10 hours a day in Warren’s boot-blacking factory located near the present Charing Cross railway station. He spent his time pasting labels on the jars of thick polish and earned six shillings a week. With this money he had to pay for his lodging and help support his family who were incarcerated in the nearby Marshalsea debtors’ prison. Charing Cross railway station. ... Marshalsea was a debtors prison in Southwark, London best known for being the central location in Charles Dickens book Little Dorrit. ...


After a few years his family's financial situation improved, partly due to money inherited from his father's family. His family was able to leave the Marshalsea but his mother did not immediately remove him from the boot-blacking factory which was owned by a relation of hers. Dickens never forgave his mother for this and resentment of his situation and the conditions working-class people lived under became major themes of his works. Dickens wrote, “No advice, no counsel, no encouragement, no consolation, no support from anyone that I can call to mind, so help me God!”


In May 1827 Dickens, began work as a law clerk, a junior office position with potential to become a lawyer. He did not like the law as a profession and after a short time as a court stenographer he became a journalist, reporting parliamentary debate and travelling Britain by stagecoach to cover election campaigns. His journalism informed his first collection of pieces Sketches by Boz and he continued to contribute to and edit journals for much of his life. In his early twenties he made a name for himself with his first novel, The Pickwick Papers. 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A law clerk is a person who assists a judge in researching issues before the court and in writing opinions. ... Shorthand is a writing method that can be done at speed because an abbreviated or symbolic form of language is used. ... Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces published by Charles Dickens in 1836. ... The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ...


On April 2, 1836 he married Catherine Hogarth, with whom he had ten children. In 1842 they travelled together to the United States; the trip is described in the short travelogue American Notes and is also the basis of some of the episodes in Martin Chuzzlewit. 2 April is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article is in the process of being merged into Travel literature, and may be outdated. ... American Notes for General Circulation is a travelogue by Charles Dickens detailing his trip to North America in 1842. ... Categories: Stub | 1843 books | Charles Dickens novels ...


Dickens’ writings were extremely popular in their day and were read extensively. His popularity allowed him to buy Gad’s Hill Place, in 1856. This large house in Rochester, Kent was very special to Dickens as he had walked past it as a child and had dreamed of living in it. The area was also the scene of some of the events of Shakespeare’s Henry IV, part 1 and this literary connection pleased Dickens. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Map sources for Rochester at grid reference TQ725695 Rochester is a small, historic town in Kent, at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway about 30 miles (50 km) from London. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare. ...


Later life

Dickens was a prolific writer who was almost always working on a new installment for a story and rarely missed a deadline.
Dickens was a prolific writer who was almost always working on a new installment for a story and rarely missed a deadline.

Dickens separated from his wife in 1858. In Victorian times divorce was almost unthinkable, particularly for someone as famous as he was. He continued to maintain her in a house for the next twenty years until she died. Although they were initially happy together, Catherine did not seem to share quite the same boundless energy for life which Dickens had. Her job of looking after their ten children and the pressure of living with and keeping house for a world famous novelist certainly did not help. Catherine’s sister Georgina moved in to help her but there were rumours that Charles was romantically linked to his sister-in-law. An indication of his marital dissatisfaction was when in 1855 he went to meet his first love Maria Beadnell. Maria was by this time married as well but she seems to have fallen short of Dickens’ romantic memory of her. Charles Dickens This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years or less. ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


On the 9th June, 1865 while returning from France to see Ellen Ternan, Dickens was involved in the Staplehurst train crash in which the first six carriages of the train plunged off of a bridge that was being repaired. The only first-class carriage to remain on the track was the one Dickens was in. Dickens spent some time tending the wounded and dying before rescuers arrived; before finally leaving he remembered the unfinished manuscript for Our Mutual Friend and he returned to his carriage to retrieve it. June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Our Mutual Friend is a novel by Charles Dickens, which tells the story of the Harmon dust fortune and those who inherit it. ...


Dickens managed to avoid an appearance at the inquiry into the crash, as it would have become known that he was travelling that day with Ellen Ternan and her mother, which could have caused a scandal. Ellen, an actress, had been Dickens’ companion since the break-up of his marriage and as he had met her in 1857 she was most likely the ultimate reason for that break-up. She continued to be his companion, and probably mistress, until his death. 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Although unharmed he never really recovered from the crash, which is most evident in the fact that his normally prolific writing shrank to completing Our Mutual Friend and starting the unfinished The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Much of his time was taken up with public readings from his best-loved novels. The shows were incredibly popular and on December 2, 1867 Dickens gave his first public reading in the United States at a New York City theatre. The effort and passion he put into these readings with individual character voices is also thought to have contributed to his death. Our Mutual Friend is a novel by Charles Dickens, which tells the story of the Harmon dust fortune and those who inherit it. ... The Mystery of Edwin Drood is the final novel by Charles Dickens. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ...


Exactly five years to the day after the Staplehurst crash, on June 9, 1870, he died. Contrary to his wish to be buried in Rochester Cathedral, he was buried in the Poets’ Corner of Westminster Abbey. The inscription on his tomb reads: “He was a sympathiser to the poor, the suffering, and the oppressed; and by his death, one of England’s greatest writers is lost to the world.” June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Poets corner Poets Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey due to the number of poets, playwrights and writers now buried and commemorated there. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster (Westminster Abbey), a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English monarchs. ...


In the 1980s the historic Eastgate House in Rochester, Kent was converted into a Charles Dickens museum, and an annual Dickens Festival is held in the city. The Eastgate House was closed in 2005 by Medway Council as an economy measure, but a "Dickens World" theme park is scheduled to open in nearby Chatham in 2007. The house in Portsmouth in which Dickens was born has also been made into a museum. // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Map sources for Rochester at grid reference TQ725695 Rochester is a small, historic town in Kent, at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway about 30 miles (50 km) from London. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Medway Towns have developed into an area of urban sprawl, situated near an environmentally significant wetlands region, and formed by the union of Chatham, Gillingham and Rochester in Kent, England. ... Chatham is the name of several places. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the English city of Portsmouth. ...


Children

His ten children by Catherine Thompson Hogarth were:

January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 63 days remaining. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... Events January 23 - The flip of a coin determines whether a new city in Oregon is named after Boston, Massachusetts, or Portland, Maine, with Portland winning. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

Novels

Dickens' writing style is florid and poetic, with a strong comic touch. His satires of British aristocratic snobbery — he calls one character the “Noble Refrigerator” — are wickedly funny. Comparing orphans to stocks and shares, people to tug boats, or dinner party guests to furniture are just some of Dickens’ flights of fancy which sum up situations better than any simple description could.


The characters themselves are among some of the most memorable in English literature. Certainly their names are. The likes of Ebenezer Scrooge, Fagin, Mrs. Gamp, Micawber, Pecksniff, Miss Havisham, Wackford Squeers and many others are so well known they can easily be believed to be living a life outside the novels, but their eccentricities do not overshadow the stories. Some of these characters are grotesques; he loved the style of 18th century gothic romance, though it had already become a bit of a joke (see Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey for a parodic example). One character most vividly drawn throughout his novels is London itself. From the coaching inns on the out-skirts of the city to the lower reaches of the Thames, all aspects of the capital are described by someone who truly loved London and spent many hours walking its streets. Ebenezer Scrooge encounters Ignorance and Want in A Christmas Carol Ebenezer Scrooge is the main character in Charles Dickens story A Christmas Carol. ... Fagin is a fictional character in the Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. ... Wilkins Micawber is a fictional character from Charles Dickens novel David Copperfield. ... Miss Havisham is a pivotal character in the Charles Dickens novel, Great Expectations (1861). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The gothic novel is an English literary genre, which can be said to have been born with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... Jane Austen, in a portrait based on one drawn by her sister Cassandra House of Jane Austen (today it is a museum) Jane Austen (December 16, 1775–July 18, 1817) was a prominent English novelist whose work is considered part of the Western canon. ... Northanger Abbey book cover Northanger Abbey was the first of Austens novels to be completed for publication, though she had previously made a start on Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben Tower Bridge at night A red double-decker bus crosses Piccadilly Circus. ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames...


Most of Dickens' major novels were first written in monthly or weekly installments in journals such as Master Humphrey's Clock and Household Words, later reprinted in book form. These installments made the stories cheap and more accessible and the series of cliff-hangers every month made each new episode more widely anticipated. Part of Dickens’ great talent was to incorporate this episodic writing style but still end up with a coherent novel at the end. The monthly numbers were illustrated by, amongst others, “Phiz” (a pseudonym for Hablot Browne). Master Humphreys Clock was a weekly periodical edited and written entirely by Charles Dickens from April 4, 1840— December 4, 1841. ... Household Words was a weekly magazine edited by Charles Dickens which took its name from the line from Shakespeare Familiar in his mouth as household words—Henry V. It was published between 1850 and 1859. ... Hablot Knight Browne (June 11, 1815 - July 8, 1882), English artist, famous as Phiz, the illustrator of the best-known books by Charles Dickens, Charles Lever and Harrison Ainsworth in their original editions. ... Hablot Knight Browne (June 11, 1815 - July 8, 1882), English artist, famous as Phiz, the illustrator of the best-known books by Charles Dickens, Charles Lever and Harrison Ainsworth in their original editions. ...

A scene from Oliver Twist, from an early 20th Century edition.
A scene from Oliver Twist, from an early 20th Century edition.

Among his best-known works are Great Expectations, David Copperfield, The Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist, Nicholas Nickleby, A Tale of Two Cities, and A Christmas Carol. David Copperfield is argued by some to be his best novel — it is certainly his most autobiographical. Lesser known, Little Dorrit is a masterpiece of acerbic satire masquerading as a rags-to-riches story. Drawing of Oliver asking for more, from website with explicit permission for free use. ... Drawing of Oliver asking for more, from website with explicit permission for free use. ... Great Expectations is a Bildungsroman (a novel tracing the life of the protagonist) by Charles Dickens and first serialized in All the Year Round from December 1860 to August 1861. ... David Copperfield or The Personal History Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery which he never meant to be published on any account is a Bildungsroman by Charles Dickens, first published in 1849. ... The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ... Oliver Twist is a novel by Charles Dickens, probably one of the best-known of all his works, along with A Christmas Carol and Great Expectations. ... The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, (or Nicholas Nickleby for short) is a comic novel of Charles Dickens. ... Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a historical novel by Charles Dickens; it is moreover a moral novel strongly concerned with themes of guilt, shame and retribution. ... Ebenezer Scrooge encounters Ignorance and Want in A Christmas Carol A Christmas Carol is a short story written by Charles Dickens. ... Little Dorrit is a serial novel by Charles Dickens published originally between 1855 and 1857. ... Satire is a literary technique of writing or art which principally ridicules its subject (for example, individuals, organizations, or states) often as an intended means of provoking or preventing change. ...


Dickens' novels were, among other things, works of social commentary. He was a fierce critic of the poverty and social stratification of Victorian society. Throughout his works, Dickens retained an empathy for the common man and a skepticism for the fine folk.


Dickens was fascinated by the theatre as an escape from the world, and theatres and theatrical people appear in Nicholas Nickleby. Dickens himself had a flourishing career as a performer, reading scenes from his works. He travelled widely in Britain and America on stage tours. The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, (or Nicholas Nickleby for short) is a comic novel of Charles Dickens. ...


Much of Dickens’ writing seems sentimental today, like the death of Little Nell in The Old Curiosity Shop. Even where the leading characters are sentimental, as in Bleak House, the many other colourful characters and events, the satire and subplots, reward the reader. Another criticism of his writing is the unrealistic and unlikeliness of his plots. This is true but much of the time he was not aiming for realism but for entertainment and to recapture the picaresque and gothic novels of his youth. When he did attempt realism his novels were often unsuccessful and unpopular. The fact that his own life story of happiness, then poverty, then an unexpected inheritance, and finally international fame was unlikely shows that unlikely stories are not necessarily unrealistic. The Old Curiosity Shop Portsmouth Street London The Old Curiosity Shop is a novel by the author Charles Dickens. ... Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in 20 monthly parts from March, 1852 through September, 1853. ... Satire is a literary technique of writing or art which principally ridicules its subject (for example, individuals, organizations, or states) often as an intended means of provoking or preventing change. ... The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresco, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular style of novel that originated in Spain and flourished in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries and has continued to influence modern literature. ... Strawberry Hill, an English mansion in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel is an English literary genre, which can be said to have been born with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ...


All authors incorporate autobiographical elements in their fiction, but with Dickens this is very noticeable, particularly as he took pains to cover up what he considered his shameful, lowly past. The scenes from Bleak House of interminable court cases and legal arguments could only come from a journalist who has had to report them. Dickens’ own family was sent to prison for poverty, a common theme in many of his books, in particular the Marshalsea in Little Dorrit. Little Nell in The Old Curiosity Shop is thought to represent Dickens’ sister-in-law, Nicholas Nickleby's father and Wilkins Micawber are certainly Dickens' own father and the snobbish nature of Pip from Great Expectations is similar to the author himself. Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in 20 monthly parts from March, 1852 through September, 1853. ... Marshalsea was a debtors prison in Southwark, London best known for being the central location in Charles Dickens book Little Dorrit. ... Little Dorrit is a serial novel by Charles Dickens published originally between 1855 and 1857. ... The Old Curiosity Shop Portsmouth Street London The Old Curiosity Shop is a novel by the author Charles Dickens. ... The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, (or Nicholas Nickleby for short) is a comic novel of Charles Dickens. ... Wilkins Micawber is a fictional character from Charles Dickens novel David Copperfield. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Great Expectations is a Bildungsroman (a novel tracing the life of the protagonist) by Charles Dickens and first serialized in All the Year Round from December 1860 to August 1861. ...


Legacy

Charles Dickens was a well known personality and his novels were immensely popular during his lifetime. His first full novel The Pickwick Papers brought him immediate fame and this fame continued right through his career. He maintained a high quality in all his writings and although never departing greatly from his typical “Dickensian” style he did experiment with different themes, moods and genres. Some of these experiments were more successful than others and the public’s taste and appreciation of his various works have varied over time. He was usually keen to give his readers what they wanted and the monthly or weekly publication of his works in episodes meant that the books could change as the story proceeded at the whim of the public. A good example of this are the American episodes in Martin Chuzzlewit which were put in by Dickens in response to lower than normal sales of the earlier chapters. In Our Mutual Friend the inclusion of the character of Riah was a positive portrayal of a Jewish character after he was criticised for the depiction of Fagin in Oliver Twist. A genre is any of the traditional divisions of art forms from a single field of activity into various kinds according to criteria particular to that form. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Fagin is a fictional character in the Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. ...


His popularity has waned little since his death and he is still one of the best known and most read of English authors. At least 180 movies and TV adaptations based on Dickens’ works help confirm his success. Many of his works were adapted for the stage during his own lifetime and as early as 1913 a silent film of The Pickwick Papers was made. His characters were often so memorable that they took on a life of their own outside his books. Gamp became a slang expression for an umbrella from the character Mrs Gamp and Pickwickian, Pecksniffian and Gradgrind all entered the dictionary owing to Dickens’ perfect portrayal of these kind of people. Sam Weller was an early superstar perhaps better known than his author at first and other characters have had their lives expanded upon by subsequent authors. It is likely that A Christmas Carol is his best known story with new adaptations almost every year. This simple morality tale with humour and pathos, for many, sums up the true meaning of Christmas and eclipses all his other Christmas stories. 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Sam Weller is a fictional character in The Pickwick Papers, the first novel by Charles Dickens, and is allegedly the character that made Dickens famous. ...


At a time when Britain was the major economic and political power of the world Dickens highlighted the life of the forgotten poor and disadvantaged at the heart of empire. Through his journalism he campaigned of specific issues such as sanitation and the workhouse but his fiction was probably all the more powerful in changing opinion. He revealed the harsh lives of the poor and satirised the people who allowed abuses to continue, all in the context of a good-humoured, entertaining story which sold widely. His works seem to have inspired many more people to address problems and inequalities, even though he poked fun at these well meaning philanthropists, and his influence is often credited with having the Marshalsea and Fleet Prisons shut down. Sanitation is a term for the hygienic disposal or recycling of waste materials, particularly human excrement. ... The Poor Law was the system for the provision of social security in operation in England and the United Kingdom from the 16th century until the establishment of the Welfare State in the 20th century. ... A philanthropist is someone who devotes his or her time, money, or effort towards helping others. ... Marshalsea was a debtors prison in Southwark, London best known for being the central location in Charles Dickens book Little Dorrit. ... Fleet Prison was a notorious London prison. ...


Dickens may have hoped for the foundation of a literary dynasty through his ten children and he named some of them after past writers but it would have been difficult for them to be anywhere near as successful as their father and some of them seem to have inherited their grandfather’s lack of financial acumen. Several of his children wrote of their memories of their father or prepared his surviving correspondence for publication but his great-granddaughter, Monica Dickens, would follow in his footsteps as a writer of novels. Monica Dickens (born 10 May 1915, died 25 December 1992) was a British writer, the great-granddaughter of Charles Dickens. ...


His works, with their vivid descriptions of life at the time, mean that the whole of Victorian society is often simply described as Dickensian. Following his death in 1870 a greater degree of realism entered literature probably in reaction to Dickens’ own tendency towards the picaresque and ridiculous. Late Victorian novelists such as Samuel Butler, Thomas Hardy and George Gissing all clearly owe much to Dickens but their works are usually much grittier and less sentimental. Writers continue to be influenced by his books and although his many faults are criticised few other writers can match his blend of characterisation, gripping plots, social commentary, popular, critical and financial success, and his sense of humour. 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... For the 17th-century author of Hudibras, see Samuel Butler (1612-1680). ... Photograph of Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was a novelist and poet, generally regarded as one of the greatest figures in English literature. ... George Gissing (November 22, 1857 - December 28, 1903) was a British novelist. ...


Quotations

  • “Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail. Mind! I don’t mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country’s done for. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a door-nail.” — A Christmas Carol
  • “Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.” — David Copperfield

Trivia

  • The word boredom first appeared in print in Bleak House.
  • The expression “what the dickens” was used long before Charles was born and is a corruption of “what the devil.”

Children commonly exhibit the emotion of boredom. ... Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in 20 monthly parts from March, 1852 through September, 1853. ...

Works

Major novels

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Oliver Twist is a novel by Charles Dickens, probably one of the best-known of all his works, along with A Christmas Carol and Great Expectations. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, (or Nicholas Nickleby for short) is a comic novel of Charles Dickens. ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Old Curiosity Shop Portsmouth Street London The Old Curiosity Shop is a novel by the author Charles Dickens. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of Eighty is a historical novel by the author Charles Dickens. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Ebenezer Scrooge encounters Ignorance and Want in A Christmas Carol A Christmas Carol is a short story written by Charles Dickens. ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Chimes is a novel by Charles Dickens. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Cricket on the Heath is a novel by Charles Dickens, written in 1845, after The Chimes. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Categories: Stub | 1843 books | Charles Dickens novels ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Dombey and Son is a novel by the Victorian author Charles Dickens. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... David Copperfield or The Personal History Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery which he never meant to be published on any account is a Bildungsroman by Charles Dickens, first published in 1849. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in 20 monthly parts from March, 1852 through September, 1853. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Hard Times is a novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1854. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Little Dorrit is a serial novel by Charles Dickens published originally between 1855 and 1857. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a historical novel by Charles Dickens; it is moreover a moral novel strongly concerned with themes of guilt, shame and retribution. ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... Great Expectations is a Bildungsroman (a novel tracing the life of the protagonist) by Charles Dickens and first serialized in All the Year Round from December 1860 to August 1861. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Our Mutual Friend is a novel by Charles Dickens, which tells the story of the Harmon dust fortune and those who inherit it. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Mystery of Edwin Drood is the final novel by Charles Dickens. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Selected other books

Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces published by Charles Dickens in 1836. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... American Notes for General Circulation is a travelogue by Charles Dickens detailing his trip to North America in 1842. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A Childs History of England is a book by Charles Dickens. ... Events January 23 - The flip of a coin determines whether a new city in Oregon is named after Boston, Massachusetts, or Portland, Maine, with Portland winning. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Short stories

  • “A Christmas Tree”
  • “A Message from the Sea”
  • “Doctor Marigold”
  • “George Silverman’s Explanation”
  • “Going into Society”
  • “Holiday Romance”
  • “Hunted Down”
  • “Mrs. Lirriper’s Legacy”
  • “Mrs. Lirriper’s Lodgings”
  • Mugby Junction
  • “Perils of Certain English Prisoners”
  • “Somebody’s Luggage”
  • “Sunday Under Three Heads”
  • “The Child’s Story”
  • “The Haunted House”
  • “The Haunted Man and the Ghost’s Bargain”
  • “The Holly-Tree”
  • “The Lamplighter”
  • “The Seven Poor Travellers”
  • “The Trial for Murder”
  • “Tom Tiddler’s Ground”
  • “What Christmas Is As We Grow Older”
  • “Wreck of the Golden Mary”

Mugby Junction was a short story by Charles Dickens written in 1866. ...

External links

Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Charles Dickens
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about:

  Results from FactBites:
 
westword.com | | Theater | Dickensian Exploitation | 2003-11-20 (1005 words)
This was underlined in Carol Reed's brilliant 1968 film, when childish heads popped up suddenly from a row of chimneys, reminding us of the skinny, underaged little sweepers who often suffocated on the job.
And the irrepressibly capering energy of Oliver is Dickensian, too.
Bill Sikes remains irredeemably evil and as haunted by his murdered Nancy's eyes as he was in the novel -- though it's impossible for the stage to emulate the blood-drenched juiciness of Dickens's prose.
Charles Dickens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2956 words)
He maintained a high quality in all his writings and although never departing greatly from his typical “Dickensian” style he did experiment with different themes, moods and genres.
Several of his children wrote of their memories of their father or prepared his surviving correspondence for publication but his great-granddaughter, Monica Dickens, would follow in his footsteps as a writer of novels.
His works, with their vivid descriptions of life at the time, mean that the whole of Victorian society is often simply described as Dickensian.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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