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Encyclopedia > Dick Irvin

James Dickinson 'Dick' Irvin (July 19, 1892 - May, 1957) was a Canadian ice hockey player and coach in the National Hockey League. July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... May is the fifth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Canada is a sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... A player of a game is a participant therein. ... In sports, a coach is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ...


Born in Hamilton, Ontario, he was one of the greatest players of his day, balancing a torrid slapshot and tough style, with gentlemanly play. He started out by playing for the Portland Rosebuds of the PCHA and was the 4th leading scoring rookie tallying 35 goals. Following a brief stint in the Canadian Army, he turned pro and played for the Regina Capitals of the WCHL until 1926 when he entered the NHL. He was signed by the newly formed Chicago Blackhawks and made inaugural captain, and did not disappoint as he had an impressive campaign, finishing second in the league in scoring. His second season turned to tragedy as he fractured his skull, which ultimately led to retirement a year later. Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Area: 1,117. ... The Portland Rosebuds were an ice hockey team based in Portland, Oregon which played in the Pacific Coast Hockey Association from 1914 to 1918. ... WCHL may refer to one of several ice hockey leagues: one of two leagues called Western Canada Hockey League, one of which existed from 1921 to 1926 and the other existed from 1932 to 1933; the current Western Hockey League which was known as Western Canada Hockey League from 1968... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a National Hockey League team based in Chicago, Illinois. ...


What Irvin lost as a player from his abbreviated playing career in the NHL, he more than made up for it as a coach. In his first season coaching, the team he retired from - the Chicago Blackhawks, he led them to 24 wins 15 losses and 9 ties. Upon seeing his success as a coach, Toronto Maple Leafs owner, Conn Smythe convinced Irvin to coach the Leafs. In his first season coaching the Leafs, he achieved immediate success by delivering a Stanley Cup Championship in his first year. However this success was short lived as Irvin was unable to deliver another Stanley Cup for the Leafs during his time as coach despite taking them to the Stanley cup final six more times. NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a National Hockey League team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Toronto Maple Leafs are a National Hockey League team based in Toronto, Ontario. ... Conn Stafford Smythe (Born: February 1, 1895 in Toronto, Ontario-November 18, 1980 in Caledon, Ontario) was a Canadian builder in the National Hockey League. ... The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ... The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ...


Irvin finally found his greatest success after joining the Montreal Canadiens in 1941, leading them to 3 Stanley Cups in 6 finals. Helped with star players Elmer Lach, Doug Harvey, goalie Bill Durnan, and a young Maurice Richard, the Canadiens were just beginning to blossom as an NHL dynasty. However, it would be under the leadership of Toe Blake that the Canadiens would achieve their finest success. It was at this time Irvin would return to the Chicago Blackhawks, however a youthful, inexperienced lineup yielded limited results, and Irvin would retire after the season. The Montréal Canadiens (officially le Club de Hockey Canadien, and known as le Bleu-Blanc-Rouge, The Habs, le Tricolore, les Glorieux, la Sainte-Flanelle, les Habitants, le Canadien, the Flying Frenchmen) are the oldest established National Hockey League and a member of the Leagues Original Six. ... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ... Elmer Lach January 22, 1918 in Nokomis, Saskatchewan was a Canadian professional ice hockey goalie who played for the Montreal Canadiens in the National Hockey League. ... For the article on the baseball umpire, see: Doug Harvey (umpire) Douglas Norman Harvey (December 19, 1924 - December 26, 1989) was a star player in the National Hockey League. ... Bill Durnan ( January 22, 1916 in Toronto, Ontario - October 31, 1972) was a Canadian professional ice hockey goalie who played for the Montreal Canadiens in the National Hockey League. ... Maurice Richard in his Canadiens uniform Joseph Henri Maurice Richard, also nicknamed Rocket Richard (born August 4, 1921 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, died May 27, 2000 in Montreal, Quebec) was a professional ice hockey player, and played for the Montreal Canadiens from 1942 to 1960. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... Hector Toe Blake (August 21, 1912 - May 17, 1995) was a Canadian ice hockey player and coach in the National Hockey League. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a National Hockey League team based in Chicago, Illinois. ...


His coaching career included 4 Stanley Cups with 693 regular season wins, of which only Al Arbour and Scotty Bowman have surpassed. The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ... William Scott Scotty Bowman (born September 18, 1933 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is a former National Hockey League head coach, considered among the greatest coaches in NHL history. ...


He passed away in 1957, a year before being elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame. 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Hockey Hall of Fame is in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; it is devoted to ice hockey rather than the field variety of the game. ...


His son, Dick Irvin, Jr., was a noted Canadian television sports announcer.



Preceded by:
Bill Tobin
Head Coaches of the Chicago Blackhawks
1930-1931
Succeeded by:
Bill Tobin
Preceded by:
Art Duncan
Head Coaches of the Toronto Maple Leafs
1931-1940
Succeeded by:
Hap Day
Preceded by:
Pit Lepine
Head Coaches of the Montreal Canadiens
1940-1955
Succeeded by:
Toe Blake
Preceded by:
Frank Eddolls
Head Coaches of the Chicago Blackhawks
1955-1956
Succeeded by:
Tommy Ivan


Clarence Hap Day (June 1, 1901 - February 17, 1990) was a Canadian sportsman in ice hockey who enjoyed a 33-year association with the National Hockey League as a player, referee, coach and general manager. ... Hector Toe Blake (August 21, 1912 - May 17, 1995) was a Canadian ice hockey player and coach in the National Hockey League. ...


External link

  • Hockey Hall of Fame (http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/LegendsOfHockey/jsp/LegendsMember.jsp?type=Player&mem=P196602&list=ByName#photo)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dick Irvin at AllExperts (487 words)
What Irvin lost as a player from his abbreviated playing career in the NHL, he more than made up for it as a coach.
However, this success was short-lived as Irvin was unable to deliver another Stanley Cup for the Leafs during his time as coach, despite taking them to the Stanley cup final six more times.
Irvin finally found his greatest success after joining the Montreal Canadiens in 1941, leading them to 3 Stanley Cups in 6 finals.
Dick Irvin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (529 words)
However, this success was short-lived as Irvin was unable to deliver another Cup for the Leafs during his time as coach, despite taking them to the finals six more times.
Smythe soon felt that Irvin had taken the Leafs as far as he could, and suggested to the Canadian Arena Company, owners of the then-moribund Montreal Canadiens, that they hire Irvin as coach in 1940.
Irvin, however, came under fire for encouraging "goon" tactics, especially after Montreal fans rioted in protest of Richard's suspension for the 1955 playoffs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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