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Encyclopedia > Diapsid
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Diapsids

A lizard
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordate
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Superclass: Tetrapoda
(unranked) Amniota
Class: Sauropsida
(unranked) Eureptilia
Subclass: Diapsida
Osborn, 1903
Groups

See Text Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1966x1270, 448 KB) Summary Brown lizard. ... Families Many, see text. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Binomial name Aptenodytes forsteri Gray, 1844 For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Vertebrata is a subphylum of chordates, specifically, those with backbones or spinal columns. ... Classes Synapsida Sauropsida Amphibia A tetrapod (Greek tetrapoda, four-legged) is a vertebrate animal having four feet, legs or leglike appendages. ... Extant subgroups Synapsida     Mammalia (mammals) Sauropsida    Anapsida        Testudines (turtles)    Diapsida        Lepidosauria           Squamata (lizards and snakes)           Sphenodontida (tuatara)        Archosauria           Crocodilia (crocodiles and alligators)           Aves (birds) The amniotes are a group of vertebrates, comprising the mammals, birds, and various other groups collectively referred to as reptiles. ... Superclasses Anapsida Eurapsida Diapsida Reptilia was an old kingdom or phylum classification that has since been divided into 4 classes. ... Groups Captorhinidae Romeriida Protorothyrididae Diapsida Eureptilia is one of the two major clades of the Sauropsida, the other being Anaspida or Parareptilia. ... Henry Fairfield Osborn (August 8, 1857 — November 6, 1935) was an American paleontologist and geologist. ...

Diapsids ("two arches") are a group of tetrapod animals that developed two holes (temporal fenestra) in each side of their skulls, about 300 million years ago during the late Carboniferous period. Living diapsids are extremely diverse, and include all birds, crocodiles, lizards, snakes, tuataras, and possibly even turtles. While some lost either one hole (lizards), or both holes (snakes), they are still classified as diapsids based on their ancestry. There are 14,600 species of diapsid existing in environments around the world today, including most flying and poisonous vertebrates. Groups See text. ... A hippopotamus skull A skull, or cranium, is a bony structure of Craniates which serves as the general framework for a head. ... Mega-annum, usually abbreviated as Ma, is a unit of time equal to one million years. ... The Carboniferous is a major division of the geologic timescale that extends from the end of the Devonian period, about 359. ... Orders Many - see section below. ... Genera Crocodylus Osteolaemus Tomistoma See full taxonomy. ... Families Many, see text. ... Superfamilies and Families Henophidia Aniliidae Anomochilidae Boidae Bolyeriidae Cylindrophiidae Loxocemidae Pythonidae Tropidophiidae Uropeltidae Xenopeltidae Typhlopoidea Anomalepididae Leptotyphlopidae Typhlopidae Xenophidia Acrochordidae Atractaspididae Colubridae Elapidae Hydrophiidae Viperidae Snakes (from Old English snaca, and ultimately from PIE base *snag- or *sneg-, to crawl), also known as ophidians, are cold blooded legless reptiles closely... Species Sphenodon punctatus Sphenodon guntheri For the experimental music band, see Tuatara (band) The tuataras are two species of reptile found in New Zealand. ... Suborders Cryptodira Pleurodira See text for families. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... In biology, a species is the basic unit of biodiversity. ... Flight is the process of flying: either movement through the air by aerodynamically generating lift or aerostatically using buoyancy, or movement beyond earths atmosphere by spacecraft. ... The skull and crossbones symbol traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ... Vertebrata is a subphylum of chordates, specifically, those with backbones or spinal columns. ...


The ancestral openings are above and below the eye, and allow the jaw to open wider, and the attachment of larger, stronger jaw muscles. A more obscure ancestral characteristic is a relatively long lower arm bone (radius), compared to the upper arm bone (humerus). Extinct groups include the dinosaurs, pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, and many more obscure lineages. The classification of most of the early groups is fluid and subject to change. The jaw is either of the two opposable structures forming, or near the entrance to, the mouth. ... The radius and ulna of the left forearm, posterior surface. ... The humerus is a long bone in the arm or fore-legs (animals) that runs from the shoulder to the elbow. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... Suborders Rhamphorhynchoidea Pterodactyloidea Pterosaurs ([TEH-row-sore], winged lizards, often referred to as pterodactyls [TEH-row-DAK-tils]) were flying reptiles of the clade Pterosauria. ... Families Cryptoclididae Elasmosauridae Plesiosauridae Pliosauridae Plesiosaurs (IPA ) (Greek: plesios, near to + sauros, lizard) were large, carnivorous aquatic reptiles. ... Subfamilies Mosasaurinae Plioplatecarpinae Tylosaurinae Mosasaurs (from Latin Mosa, the Meuse river where the fossils were first discovered + Greek sauros, lizard) were serpentine marine reptiles, more closely related to snakes than to monitor lizards (Lee 1997). ...


Diapsid Groups

Subclass DIAPSIDA

Groups Utatsusaurus Parvinatator Eoichthyosauria Grippidae/Grippidia Ichthyosauria Ichthyopterygia (fish flippers) was a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840 to designate the Jurassic Ichthyosaurs that were known at the time, but the term is now used more often for both true Ichthyosauria and their more primitive early and middle... Groups Coelurosauravidae Claudiosaurus Younginiformes Ichthyopterygia Sauria: Lepidosauromorpha Archosauromorpha Neodiapsida is a clade or major branch of the reptilian family tree, that includes all Diapsids apart from some early primitive types known as Araeoscelidia. ... Orders Sphenodontia Squamata Eosuchia Conservation status: Fossil The Lepidosauria are a subclass of reptiles comprising the orders : Squamata Sphenodontia or Rhynchocephalia Eosuchia Conservation status: Fossil Lepidosaurians are the most successful of modern reptiles. ... Groups ?Placodontia Pachypleurosauridae Nothosauridae    Plesiosauria Sauropterygia (lizard flippers) is a group of very successful aquatic reptiles that flourished during the Age of the Dinosaurs before they became extinct. ... Orders Sphenodontia Squamata Eosuchia Conservation status: Fossil The Lepidosauria are a subclass of reptiles comprising the orders : Squamata Sphenodontia or Rhynchocephalia Eosuchia Conservation status: Fossil Lepidosaurians are the most successful of modern reptiles. ... Groups Order Rhynchosauria Order Trilophosauria Order Prolacertiformes Plesion     Archosauriformes Division        Archosauria Archosauromorpha (Greek for ruling reptiles form) are a diverse group or Infraclass of diapsid reptiles that first appeared during the late Permian, but only became common during the Triassic. ... Families See text Turtles are reptiles of the order Testudinata, most of whose body is shielded by a special bony shell developed from their ribs. ... Families See text Prolacertiformes (sometimes called Protorosaurs) were a bizarre order of diapsid reptiles that lived during the Permian and Triassic Periods. ... Groups Pterosauria Crocodylia (crocodiles) Dinosauria    Aves (birds) Archosaurs (Greek for ruling reptiles) are a group of diapsid reptiles that first appeared during the late Permian (roughly 250 million years ago). ... sub-taxa Family Phytosauridae Family Prestosuchidae Family Ornithosuchidae Family Stagonolepididae Family Rauisuchidae Family Poposauridae Superorder Crocodylomorpha    Sphenosuchia    Order Crocodylia Reference Benton, M. J. 2004, Vertebrate Paleontology Crurotarsi (cross-ankles) is a node-based taxon created by Paul Sereno in 1991 to supplant the old term Pseudosuchia. ... Suborders Rhamphorhynchoidea Pterodactyloidea Pterosaurs (TEH-row-sore, winged lizards) were flying reptiles of the clade Pterosauria. ... Orders Saurischia    Sauropodomorpha    Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs are giant reptiles that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for most of their 165-million year existence. ... For other meanings of bird, see bird (disambiguation). ...

External links

  • Diapsida. Michel Lauren and Jacques A. Gauthier. Tree of Life Web Project. June 22, 2000.
  • Diapsida Cladogram

  Results from FactBites:
 
Diapsid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (191 words)
Diapsids ("two arches") are a group of tetrapod animals that developed two holes (temporal fenestra) in each side of their skulls, about 300 million years ago during the late Carboniferous period.
Living diapsids are extremely diverse, and include all birds, crocodiles, lizards, snakes, tuataras, and possibly even turtles.
There are 14,600 species of diapsid existing in environments around the world today, including most flying and poisonous vertebrates.
Origin of Dinosaurs and Mammals - Erickson (2440 words)
Synapsid and diapsid reptiles were only very distantly related, having diverged from the basal reptile stock during the Pennsylvanian period 100 million years before the Triassic.
Diapsids were rather obscure during the 80 million years of synapsid supremacy.
In general, the solid-skulled synapsid reptiles had massive and thick-boned skeletons whereas the skeletons of the open-skulled diapsids, and the dinosaurs in particular, were slender and lightly constructed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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