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Encyclopedia > Diapason

The word diapason (pronounced [ˌdaɪəˈpeɪsən]) is another name for the musical interval of the octave, especially in the context of Pythagorean intervals. In other contexts, it can mean the range of a musical instrument or voice. It also has more specific uses: The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... In music theory, an interval is the relationship between two notes or pitches, the lower and higher members of the interval. ... In music, an octave (sometimes abbreviated 8ve or 8va) is the interval between one musical note and another with half or double the frequency. ... The intervals of Pythagorean tuning are just intervals involving only powers of two and three. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ...

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The organ stop

The diapason is the principal, or foundation, stop of the pipe organ, which has pipes throughout the entire range of the instrument. Diapason pipes give the organ its characteristic sound, and the 8-foot diapason (that is, the one which sounds middle C when middle C is pressed) may be said to be the one stop that is essential on virtually all organs of all sizes. This article is part of the Pipe Organ Refactor Project. ...


Diapasons come in two varieties: open, where the end of the pipe is clear, producing a bright sound; and stopped where the end of the pipe is blocked, producing a more muffled, sweeter sound. The name diapason is also used on some electric organs for voices which imitate the pipe organ stop. The organ is a type of keyboard musical instrument, distinctive because the sound is not produced by a percussion action, as on a piano or celesta, or by means of vibrating strings, as on the harpsichord. ...


A stop of diapason tone quality is not always called diapason. "Diapason" is most commonly used in English-style organs, whereas the same type of stop is known as a "Prinzipal" or "Principal" on German-style organs and a "Montre" or "Praestant" on French-style organs. Also, stops of this tone quality at higher pitches often go by other names: for example, on English-style organs, the stops called Principal and Fifteenth sound one octave and two octaves respectively above the 8-foot Diapason; or on German-style organs, the name Octav is used to indicate the stop an octave above the 8-foot Prinzipal.


The "Tibia Clausa", which is designed much more like the organ stop known as a bourdon is the fundamental tone of the theatre organ rather than the diapason. The name Bourdun is derived from the French word for buzz and normally denotes a stopped flute/flue type of pipe in an organ, though in organ building the stop has no buzz, but rather a very dark, heavy tone, strong in fundamental, with little overtone development. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Pitch standard

Diapason is also used to refer to a physical implementation of a pitch standard, for instance a tuning fork used as a standard. In music, pitch is the perception of the frequency of a note. ...


The diapason normal

Diapason Normal is the name given to the historical pitch standard where the A above middle C is tuned to 435 Hz. This standard was set by law in 1859 in France, and became popular throughout Europe. In 1939, A = 440 Hz was codified as the international standard of concert pitch for broadcast music, and has replaced the diapason normal. In music, the term middle C refers to the note C located between the staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave form. ... The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the SI unit of frequency. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... In music, pitch is the perception of the frequency of a note. ...


See also

  • Historical pitch standards

  Results from FactBites:
 
Diapason - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (398 words)
The diapason is the principal, or foundation, stop of the pipe organ, which has pipes throughout the entire range of the instrument.
Diapason pipes give the organ its characteristic sound, and the 8-foot diapason (that is, the one which sounds middle C when middle C is pressed) may be said to be the one stop that is essential on virtually all organs of all sizes.
Diapason is also used to refer to a physical implementation of a pitch standard, for instance a tuning fork used as a standard.
diapason - definition of diapason in Encyclopedia (340 words)
The diapason is the principal stop of the pipe organ, which has pipes throughout the entire range of the instrument.
In harmony, diapason is the ratio of 2:1 between a pair of frequencies or, equivalently, of 1:2 between a pair of wavelengths.
Diapason is 10 in binary, and it is the sum of all the reciprocals of triangular numbers:
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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